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Discussion Starter #1
OK - I did a search and really couldn't find much on this (I'm reposting this from dive watch sub-forum - I guess only new iron flies over there). Has anyone here ever bought (or been given/willed) an older (pre 1980's & earlier) dive watch and had it serviced and gaskets replaced & pressure tested? Is it even really possible to be confident in using a pre- 1980's and earlier dive watch in the water that's been serviced? I know technology has improved a lot over the years and many of the older dive watches I've come across don't have very high ratings engraved on the back. I really like the look of some of those old watches (esp. some of the funky cushion cased ones) and would like to maybe get one and have it restored, but I would want to be able to use it as such and not just a 'dry only' use watch.
 

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Assuming no damage has been done over the years to the watch case (buildup of old gaskets, scrapes in the groves, etc.) there is no reason new, properly sized gaskets which were properly placed would not restore the watch to original levels of water resistance. In any event, after restoration the watch can be tested to assure the desired level of resistance can be attained.

Go for it!
 

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It can be doen but not a lot of watchmakers want to do it anymore. Or not give warranty on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info - it sounds like it might be hit or miss finding someone (& good points about the overall condition too). I guess assuming I find a good vintage diver and find someone who will do the work (& presumably not warranty it) maybe the best approach would be just figure that it's only suitable for swimming & shallow snorkeling. I wish they still made more dive watches like the funky 60's & 70's styles (a few boutique places still do, like Zixen, but not the mainstream guys anymore).
 

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Thanks for the info - it sounds like it might be hit or miss finding someone (& good points about the overall condition too). I guess assuming I find a good vintage diver and find someone who will do the work (& presumably not warranty it) maybe the best approach would be just figure that it's only suitable for swimming & shallow snorkeling. I wish they still made more dive watches like the funky 60's & 70's styles (a few boutique places still do, like Zixen, but not the mainstream guys anymore).
An omega PloProf is still pretty funky if you ask me :) And the new Seamaster 300 Master Coaxial is seriously awesome.
 
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