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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I noticed we are missing some photos of the largest (US) plane in the world. Until Airbus has 111 A380 flying then they can’t claim to be the biggest :-d

The picts left to right: Takeoff in front of Mt. Rainer at McChord AFB, WA for the AMC Rodeo (we won) / C-5 behind another C-5 in formation for strategic airdrop / C-5 in contact formation for air refueling behind a KC-135 / C-5 on Antarctica / C-5 swallows the SEAL team boat / C-5M (new GE CF-6 engine) cockpit / Flight Engineer's station / Old analog C-5 / New glass C-5 GATM modified cockpit / C-5 refueling behind a KC-135 as seen on Google Earth

I’ve spent the last 4 years flying the C-5 literally all around the world. Here are some of my favorite photos. I didn’t take most of these so I can’t take credit for them but they are cool.

I have a few 769,000 lb take offs and even a few 700,000 + lb landings (due to emergency returns).

Here is a copy of the Air Force Facts Sheet on the C-5.

MissionThe gigantic C-5 Galaxy, with its tremendous payload capability, provides the Air Mobility Command airlift in support of United States national defense. The C-5 can carry fully equipped combat-ready military units to any point in the world on short notice and then provide field support required to help sustain the fighting force. FeaturesThe C-5 is one of the largest aircraft in the world and the largest airlifter in the Air Force inventory. The C-5 can carry more than any other airlifter. It has the ability to carry 36 standard pallets and up to 81 troops simultaneously. The Galaxy also carries all of the Army's air-transportable combat equipment, including such bulky items as its 74-ton mobile scissors bridge from the United States to any theater of combat on the globe. It can also carry outsize and oversize cargo intercontinental ranges and can take off or land in relatively short distances. Ground crews are able to load and off-load the C-5 simultaneously at the front and rear cargo openings, reducing cargo transfer times. Other features of the C-5 are:
  • Able to operate on runways 6,000 feet long (1,829 meters)
  • Six landing gear totaling 28 wheels to distribute the weight.
  • Nose and aft doors that open the full width and height of the cargo compartment to permit faster and easier loading.
  • A "kneeling" landing gear system that permits lowering of the parked aircraft so the cargo floor is at truck-bed height or to facilitate vehicle loading and unloading.
  • Full width drive-on ramps at each end for loading double rows of vehicles.
  • A system that records and analyzes information and detects malfunctions in more than 800 test points.
The C-5 has the distinctive high T-tail, 25-degree wing sweep, and four TF39 turbofan engines mounted on pylons beneath the wings. These engines are rated at 43,000 pounds of thrust each, and weigh 7,900 pounds (3,555 kilograms) each. They have an air intake diameter of more than 8.5 feet (2.6 meters). Each engine pod is nearly 27 feet long (8.2 meters).

The Galaxy has 12 internal wing tanks with a total capacity of 51,150 gallons (194,370 liters) of fuel -- enough to fill 6 1/2 regular size railroad tank cars. A full fuel load weighs 332,500 pounds (150,820 kilograms). A C-5 with a cargo load of 270,000 pounds (122,472 kilograms) can fly 2,150 nautical miles, offload, and fly to a second base 500 nautical miles away from the original destination -- all without aerial refueling. With aerial refueling, the aircraft's range is limited only by crew endurance.

Background
Lockheed-Georgia Co. delivered the first operational Galaxy to the 437th Airlift Wing, Charleston Air Force Base, S.C., in June l970. C-5s are operated by active-duty, Reserve, and Air National Guard crews. They are currently stationed at Dover AFB, Del.; Travis AFB, Calif.; Lackland AFB, Texas; Stewart Air National Guard Base, N.Y.; Martinsburg ANGB, W.V.; Memphis ANGB, Tenn.; Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio and Westover Air Reserve Base, Mass.

In March 1989, the last of 50 C-5B aircraft was added to the 76 C-5As in the Air Force's airlift force structure. The C-5B includes all C-5A improvements as well as more than 100 additional system modifications to improve reliability and maintainability.

Based on a study showing 80 percent of the C-5 airframe service life remaining, AMC began an aggressive program to modernize the C-5. The C-5 Avionics Modernization Program began in 1998 and includes upgrading avionics to Communications, Navigation, Surveillance/Air Traffic Management compliance, improving navigation, communication, and safety equipment, and installing a new autopilot system. Another part of the modernization plan is a comprehensive Re-engining and Reliability Program, which includes new CF-6 engines, pylons and auxiliary power units, with upgrades to aircraft skin and frame, flight controls, landing gear and the pressurization system. This modernization program will enhance aircraft reliability and maintainability, maintain structural and system integrity, reduce cost of ownership and increase operational capability well into the 21st century.

General Characteristics
Primary Function: Outsize cargo transport
Prime Contractor: Lockheed-Georgia Co.
Power Plant: Four General Electric TF-39 engines
Thrust: 43,000 pounds, each engine
Wingspan: 222.9 feet (67.89 meters)
Length: 247.1 feet (75.3 meters)
Height: 65.1 feet (19.84 meters)
Cargo Compartment: height , 13.5 feet (4.11 meters); width, 19 feet (5.79 meters); length, 143 feet, 9 in (43.8 meters)
Pallet Positions: 36
Maximum Cargo: 270,000 pounds (122,472 kilograms)
Maximum Takeoff Weight: 769,000 pounds (348,818 kilograms) (peacetime), 840,000 pounds (381,024 kilograms) (wartime)
Speed: 518 mph (.77 Mach)
Range: 6,320 nautical miles without air refueling; unlimited with in-flight refueling
Crew: 7 (pilot, co-pilot, two flight engineers and three loadmasters)
Unit Cost: C-5A - $152.8 million (FY98 constant dollars) C-5B - $179 million (FY98 constant dollars)
Deployed: C-5A - 1969, C-5B - 1980
Inventory: Total force, 111
 

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Thanks for the Fotos, skybum - I have always admired the C-5 flying out of Rhein-Main Airbase, very huge and very low, with a very distinctive sound. :-!

Any chance of the picture and/or a description of cockpit clock for our cockpit clock thread? ;-)
 

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too bad they are all done and going to be phased out in place of the C-17's
 

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too bad they are all done and going to be phased out in place of the C-17's
Where are you getting this info? It is simply not true.

The C-5 will be around for a lot longer maybe 20+ years. The C-17 is getting beat up and the oldest C-17 (the same age as the newest C-5) have the same reliability as the C-5; around 70%. The C-5 carries twice the cargo and passengers. A full C17 of cargo = no pax. The C-17 burns the same fuel/hr as a C-5. The C-5 can go a lot further than a C-17 w/o air refueling or a gas stop.

We are making a lot of improvements to the C-5; it is now 100% GATAM compatible, the same FMS as the 757 and latest Airbus. I flew around the world and din't have to talk on the HF over the ponds b/c of the CPDLC and ADS.

The C-17 does a good job at assault landings into dirt runways but we [the Air Force] don't do that very often b/c of the risk.

The C-5 can actually taxi on worse pavement conditions than the C-17 we just have really long wings and taxiing the C-5 is a challenge.

Both the C-5 and C-17 will be around for a long time. The C-17 can't replace what the C-5 does well carry a lot of cargo AND pax over long distances.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the Fotos, skybum - I have always admired the C-5 flying out of Rhein-Main Airbase, very huge and very low, with a very distinctive sound. :-!

Any chance of the picture and/or a description of cockpit clock for our cockpit clock thread? ;-)
Typing up a post for the cockpits err flightdeck!

I wish we still went to Rhein-Main, I never had the chance before it closed. I'll have to live vicariously through others stories.

~ Steve
 

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Maybe it was the upgrade i was reading about ... I was USAF for a decade so I'm not in the woods completly . The C17 will be a nice compliment to the C5, much better than the pig of a C-141 . Here at Elemendorf they are standing up both F22's and C-17's
 

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Polish X - yep it is looking like the new engines the "M" model with the GECF6 engine will most likely not be approved. They want about $80M per plane to put on new engines, bleed air, hydraulics, etc. But I think it is well worth it at least to modify our 50 B models. The new engines are amazing and no aircraft in the world would be able to perform like that. We even set a time-to-climb record with the new engines in the test phase. The C-141 was a pig.

BTW - I was up in Elmendorf for the summer solstice and we caught a King in Ship's Creek! Combat fishing at its finest, elbow to elbow.
 

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The first airframe I worked on in the Air Force was the C-5, also known as FRED (F---King Ridiculous Economic Disaster). It was also my favorite. I still love the "song" of the original engines; the new ones on the M model now make it sound like every other heavy.
 
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