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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Assume the watch is insusceptible to wear and tear over time an d is a manual wound. The watch is worn by a man who is forever in awake, steadily walking forward. Wouldn't his continuous motion keep his watch running indefinitely as it continuously displaces the balance wheel?
I;m guessing yes, but Im not sure if im missing some factor that would change the otu come otherwise.

Furthermore, what if the watch is susceptible to wear an tear?
 

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Do you mean that you assume that the walking man's motion alone will keep the movement functioning?
Answer no.
The mainspring is needed to keep the rest in motion.

As for the second question, it is not possible to design and make any mechanical construction that has zero friction.
friction= wear
The oils/lubricants lessen the friction, but do not completely eliminate it.
 

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If you assume that the lubes and oils will last forever, and that you achieve an absolute friction free mechanical piece, you are encroaching on the Perpentuum Mobile idea.
Friction is the part that unfortunately ruins everything.

And you not only have a friction metween the parts themselves, you have also friction between the moving parts and the air.
Ok, that can be eliminated by absolute Vacuum.
 

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If the man walks at a uniform rate of speed, the watch is at rest in his reference frame and so the same laws apply as if it were on his wrist and he were standing still. A manual watch runs down if you don't wind it. I think we can probably neglect relativity in this case.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What if the man's acceleration is varied?
How would a would watch run is in an absolute vaccuum with zero friction?
Would it even run, or would absolute vaccuum means 0k temperature therefore the watch is frozen (despite being wounded)?
BTW, this is all based on my observation from shaking a mechanical watch and seeing the hands move
 

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What if the man's acceleration is varied?
How would a would watch run is in an absolute vaccuum with zero friction?
Would it even run, or would absolute vaccuum means 0k temperature therefore the watch is frozen (despite being wounded)?
BTW, this is all based on my observation from shaking a mechanical watch and seeing the hands move
must be the bc bud;)
 

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:think: What about fatigue? The hairspring for example can't possibly go on forever and preserve the same tension. Give it a few thousand years and it might turn into a useless piece of wire. Also, when speaking of "forever" there are some parts inside hitting each other and it's just a matter of millenniums before something gets bent too much, or cracks.
 

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A watch might move a bit when shaken but it needs potential energy to release through its escapement if it's going to keep proper time. It's not designed to get its energy by movement unless it has a rotor that winds the spring.
You might better try to run a pendulum clock by simple harmonic displacement (assuming you could do this indefinitely. Want to try swinging a pendulum in a 1 second periodicity for a couple of hours - good luck.)
 

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:think: What about fatigue? The hairspring for example can't possibly go on forever and preserve the same tension. Give it a few thousand years and it might turn into a useless piece of wire[1]. Also, when speaking of "forever" there are some parts inside hitting each other and it's just a matter of millenniums before something gets bent too much, or cracks[2].
1) You can keep the deflection of the spring below the fatigue limit, it will last forever.

2) The bending strains on movement parts is low enough so that this is not a problem, however, wear will occur even in properly lubricated movement, which will eventually limit the life of the movement.
 

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I am not sure, but absolute vacuum does not result in 0 Kelvin. But as said, not sure.
 

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Then there's the matter of proton disintegration. Within a few trillion "google" years (yes, there really is a number called a google), the matter within the watch would atomically disintegrate and there wouldn't likely be any "matter" in the universe as we know it!
 

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Then there's the matter of proton disintegration. Within a few trillion "google" years (yes, there really is a number called a google), the matter within the watch would atomically disintegrate and there wouldn't likely be any "matter" in the universe as we know it!
Dude, you're going too far. How about brequet watches ?
the ones that exists since 1775, did they survive the millenium:p
 

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The watch is worn by a man who is forever in awake, steadily walking forward. Wouldn't his continuous motion keep his watch running indefinitely as it continuously displaces the balance wheel?
But would the watch be accurate?
After all, mechanical watches typically gain or lose at least several seconds per day....so if our "ever walking man" never stopped to reset his watch, it would be quite inaccurate after a few decades.
Essentially it would become just a piece of ticking jewelry, and not a timepiece.;-)
 

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I am not sure, but absolute vacuum does not result in 0 Kelvin. But as said, not sure.
Theoretically, the temperature of an absolute vacuum will be 0 Kelvin (or Rankin, for those of us who prefer non-metric units). Because at 0 K (0 R) there is no atomic motion, if there no atoms, there can be no motion of them.

However, if an object is placed inside a chamber and the chamber is pumped down to an absolute vacuum, the object will not assume the temperature of the chamber, as without an atmoshere, there will be almost no thermal transfer, as a vacuum is an almost perfect insulator.

And further, even if the watch itself was cooled to 0 Kelvin, there is no reason for it to stop working, there is nothing blocking the movement of its parts, unless the shirinkage due to thermal contraction is sufficient to cause loss of clearances. It would keep very good time though.
 

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Assume the watch is insusceptible to wear and tear over time an d is a manual wound. The watch is worn by a man who is forever in awake, steadily walking forward. Wouldn't his continuous motion keep his watch running indefinitely as it continuously displaces the balance wheel?
I;m guessing yes, but Im not sure if im missing some factor that would change the otu come otherwise.

Furthermore, what if the watch is susceptible to wear an tear?
Well, yes if you assume the man lives for ever, ignore wear, metal fatigue, oil thickening to a hard mass and assume that the manual watch is rotor and not crown wound then yes I suppose it is possible.

If you had a quartz movement powered by a battery with an infinite store of electricity, ignore material fatigue then the man wouldn't have to walk. He could set back in an easy chair with an infinite beer in hand observe the watch running for ever.

But I don't understand why you are asking the question.
 

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What about how the temp change would effect the lubricating oils in the watch?
They will go solid. But we should assume hat the watch parts are kept separated by other means to be able to acheve absolute friction lessness.
Magnetism?

Intersting discussion this.
I am learning!
What Rankin. Who is Rankin? I have to google that Imposter! ;-)
 

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Yes,and when you sit in my Chair and get some treatment, it feels like Forever! ;-) :-d
 
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