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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi!

I need help for one vintage Doxa Anti-Magnetique from my collection. I have found it and started to examine, and saw some pretty strange thing on the movement. Like something is 'scratched', above 'DOXA S.A.' sign. It's quite suspicious to me... :-s
I have many Doxa watches, but none has such movement. The good thing is that it's working. I'm only concerned that the previous owner was trying to 'fix' something there and deliberately scratched some important sign or number (my dad bought the watch God knows how many years ago).
Other than 'DOXA S.A.' and '17 rubis', there is no other sign on the movement. The watch is little larger than other Doxa watches I got, diameter is 38mm.

I would appreciate any info about this watch movement.

These are some pictures :


Doxa I.JPG Doxa II.JPG Doxa III.JPG Doxa IV.JPG Doxa V.JPG Doxa VI.JPG Doxa VII.JPG

Thanks and Best Regards!

Mimi
 

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No shock protection + that design = very late 1940s or very early 1950s.

The movement is by A. Schild:
bidfun-db Archive: Watch Movements: AS 1188

It looks like some inscriptions were machined off- I don't know why. The Doxa stamp on the movement does not inspire confidence. But the dial appears to be genuine, so it has to fit that movement (placement of dial feet). Well, appears to be, but not necessarily is. I don't know why the Doxa font has faded, while the entire minute track is still sharp. I'm always suspicious of such "selective aging"- could have been caused by someone's attempt at dial cleaning, and could be a partial redial (yes, not always is the entire dial being painted from scratch!)..

Whatever was it that was removed from the movement, it wasn't the serial. Doxa placed serial numbers only on the outer side of the case back. Which is the only thing, the picture of which you didn't post.

The watch has obviously been tampered with, I'm pretty sure that some inscriptions were removed from that movement. It might be a replacement movement- identical, albeit originally not signed by Doxa. Could also be a replacement train bridge.

The oversized case makes it a wee bit more collectible, however not by much, since Doxa made a lot of oversized specimens- I see them at flea markets quite often. Would have bought myself one, if not for the usual poor condition of the case- Doxa got many things right, but the quality of chrome plating was never one of them (I guess Tissot did the best job with that).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank You very much, for detailed response!

Strange things indeed, from machined off inscriptions, faded Doxa fonts on the dial... What is more, I was comparing usual Doxa stamps on the movement, and this one appears to be lower than usual (on machined off place was usual stamp).

Lately many watches caused me a headache, e.g. dial of one brand, movement another, etc. And I have no idea how such things exist, who was doing it and why, was it a watchmaker's 'deed', or what. I'm sure my dad didn't touch anything, among thousands of watches in collection, he just has no time to deal with specific one, and has no knowledge to fix.

Considering serial number, the case back is totally empty - no sign on it, this is why I didn't take a photo. Might be another question mark, about it.

Partial redial... I haven't heard of it before, now I did from You. I guess I'm about to meet these things, and similar non-logical ones in future. That can probably be a work of an amateur, and not a watchmaker.

I believe this what You said, is true : "I'm pretty sure that some inscriptions were removed from that movement. It might be a replacement movement- identical, albeit originally not signed by Doxa. Could also be a replacement train bridge." Something about that movement just doesn't fit. Might be movement of another watch, just later added 'Doxa S.A.'.

You are right about oversize, I personally like it, as more collectible, looks like slightly out of 'pattern'. And another true - quality of chrome plating in Doxa watches isn't something to be proud of. Other vintage Doxa watches I got, have the same so-so case condition, like they are 200 years old, and not some, let's say, 50-60.
The only thing that comforts me with this watch, is that it runs perfectly, not a minute late or ahead.


Thank You once again, now I have complete view in this watch, and of course, learnt some new stuff!



Best Regards,

Mimi
 

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As to the potentially reworked minute track, I doubt that an amateur could have pulled it off- the track is correctly aligned, and of good quality.

By the way, if you want to know the exact year of manufacture of a Doxa, there should be a 7-digit serial number on the outer side of the case back. The first two digits are the year of manufacture (for Doxas made between 1940 and 1965). Since there is no serial, and I've just noticed that there's a dot after the A in S.A., and the stamps are rather of considerably lower quality any other Doxa from that period that I have seen, I'm slowly leaning towards considering the dial the only more or less legit Doxa part of this watch. In other words, I suspect a fake based on a watch by a way less recognisable brand. Now, since you're in Eastern Europe, that's not particularly surprising, as Doxa (along with Cyma, Atlantic, Delbana and Tissot) was held in quite high regards there, since it was one of the few brands available behind the Iron Curtain- and one of only a few fairly affordable ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Probably watchmakers of those times used to work with little material that was available, so they were just assembling dial of one brand, movement of another... this is what I actually noticed in few watches. Besides this one, I got same situation with one Cyma watch as well (I also asked here for opinion), and turned out to be Cyma dial, but Ruhla movement! Still this thing is mysterious to me, was it a lack of material?

This what You wrote is quite good to remember : "There should be a 7-digit serial number on the outer side of the case back. The first two digits are the year of manufacture (for Doxas made between 1940 and 1965)." This information will be helpful in future.

The possible lack of material I mentioned above, could be as consequence of living in Eastern Europe of that time, so assembling parts of different brands might be the answer.
You are right about available brands here, like Doxa, Darwil, Tissot, Cyma, even Atlantic, they are very usual and popular here.

From now on, I will be more careful during examination, considering this different-parts-assembling phenomenon in some watch brands popular in this area. Even to turn out to be fake as few ones I examined, I don't get disappointed, it's good to discover what exists in watch world, and always a good lesson.


Best Regards!



Mimi
 

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By the way, if you're interested in identifying and collecting Doxa watches, do have a look at my "Brief Guide to Vintage Doxa" in the "Links and Articles" section of the Vintage & Pocket Watches forum (F11). It's all there, an overview of movements, serials, descriptions of font types...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
By the way, if you're interested in identifying and collecting Doxa watches, do have a look at my "Brief Guide to Vintage Doxa" in the "Links and Articles" section of the Vintage & Pocket Watches forum (F11). It's all there, an overview of movements, serials, descriptions of font types...

I will be happy to! Right now I'm going to look at it, and will bookmark the page, to have it whenever I might need in future. ;-)

Thank You!
 
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