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I just feel that the watch brands are selling out. I feel the same way about the HUBLOT BITCOIN watch.

I just don't get the appeal of such an arrangement for the long term benefit of the watch brands involved.

Can someone provide some convincing arguments as to the merits of the collaborations? Am I missing the plot here? I fear of missing out on something that is worth looking into.
 

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I don't think every collaboration is worth it, but looking at how the Hodinkee collabs have appreciated in value (Skipper, Laurent Ferrier at auction), I decided to be proactive and get in while I can.

Take the Hodinkee Speedmaster and Hermes GMTs, for example. Lots of hate for this Speedy on these forums, but the fact that they are limited to 500 is huge for me (consider Omega's usual limited run #s).

Then take the Hermes GMT. They made 90 originally, which essentially sold out immediately, likely to the Hermes devotees. For Hodinkee they only made 24.

Love it or hate it, I think it is hard to deny that Hodinkee has placed themselves well within today's watch world. Should they fade away down the road, I'll still have 2 truly limited run watches which would at least be interesting conversation pieces 20 years down the road.



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Unless the collaboration offers a significantly distinctive look or feature for a reasonable premium (or no extra charge), then no, I cannot explain it. There have been a few collaboration pieces I have looked at because they were available (2nd hand) for the same price as the "normal" version but were a little more interesting, such as the "De Stijl" Nomos that was circulating around. Timeless Luxury and Topper's have also done some little design tweaks that are nice and not overly expensive.

But Hodinkee's stuff doesn't do it for me; I'll let some trust-fund-hipster (or Wall Street watch-noob) get in line for whatever they are peddling.
 
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The 2 things are somewhat different.

A collaboration between a watch dealer...Hodinkee, Timeless, Topper, Wempe, Bucherer, etc...and a manufacturer...JLC, Nomos, etc....for a special edition is often driven by the dealer side...not the manufacturer. Timeless did, for example, Nomos Orions with blue dials and red or yellow indices, IIRC. This was before Nomos did much of anything with blue, IIRC. Now, I'm not sure how the burden of risk is spread; I doubt the dealer contracts for the entire run all at once. I expect they order a batch at a time, or on a schedule. But the risk they'll sell, is entirely on the dealer. For the manufacturer, it's a straight contract. So by and large...it's a Timeless special edition that happens to be a Nomos, for those Orions. Timeless is looking to capitalize.

Hublot's Bitcoin, OTOH, does look to be them trying to create artificial interest. But this is nothing new; it's been going on probably as long as there've been souvenirs. :) Are Omega's Olympic editions really any different? OK, I do qualify an exception...watches for charity, such as Nomos' Tangente for Doctors without Borders. That one's not a limited edition per se, but the idea holds.

Buy one of them not because they're a collaboration, not because they're special editions and they'll gain in value...what IS fair to say is that, there's so many of these that the "special" aspect of special and limited editions, taken as a whole, is generally meaningless. There's exceptions, like Piaget's micro-mosaic watches...the dial is a portrait done with thousands of tiny colored glass beads. IIRC, they made 3 of the Venice scene. Buy a Bucherer Blue Edition JLC MUT because you love JLC's movement and the blue dial's bloody awesome.

There's no harm to you, as long as you resist the hype. :) But it happens in *many* commodity sectors, and it's done by a broad swath within the sector. Heck, if anything, blame the short consumer attention span, and the perceived need to release *something* regularly.
 

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One of the more recent, with Stowa I believe, was a great looking watch. It wasn't priced any higher either. I would have bought it if I hadn't just purchased 2 watches. I think if it's something well designed, priced right, limited run, and I like it, then I'll definitely buy it, not because I expect it to be an investment but because I enjoy it and hopefully nobody else will have one!
 

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Simple. Follow the money.... Hermes & Hodinkee sold over $1 million USD of watches in a few hours.

But in this case, I actually think that the partnership made sense. As Jamerson noted, the Hermes GMT was already an extremely limited edition which sold out long ago. By partnering with Hodinkee – and changing the colors (for the worse IMHO.... but that is another matter) – they were able to make a few more of these wonderful watches available without alienating those who had previously purchased the initial release. Does this work for all brands, all partnerships, and all limited editions? Absolutely not. But in this case, I think there is a compelling case to be made for why it made sense.
 

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Worth what? are you an investor hoping to find a watch to flip for profit? or an enthusiast that's looking for a nice watch to own that's a little bit different to what everyone else has?

If you're a flipper then they may be perceived as more desirable and a reasonable short-term investment. If you're an enthusiast then who cares what anyone else thinks, buy it if you like it or don't if you don't.
 

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As long as it's not going to be detrimental to the brand long term, then they'll do it. It's money coming in, after all. Whether it's actually a big positive for them or not is a different matter.

As to what you're missing, if you don't have much interest then you're not missing anything. There is no rule that you have to like every collaboration or every watch. Just like what you like and don't waste any energy trying to understand why some human's are different to you.
 

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In the long-term, I think limited editions' value should be less than full production models since limited editions are build on initial hype.

Brands use Hodinkee for advertising, not necessarily to sell watches through Hodinkee indefinitely.
 

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Generally any exposure is good exposure too. I'm sure the number of "normal" slim d'Hermes watches that were sold to someone who wanted to buy the Hodinkee LE but couldn't was more than zero. Maybe that's someone who wouldn't have bought the watch under normal circumstances.

I know I'm kicking myself for not buying one of the Hodinkee/Hermes watches. I had it in my shopping cart when they were still available.
 

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The think that drives me crazy is the brands that are constantly releasing new limited editions & special editions, hoping to sucker collectors into buying the same watch over again.

It's like that line from The Incredibles - "When everyone is special, then no one is."
 

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As long as it's not going to be detrimental to the brand long term, then they'll do it. It's money coming in, after all. Whether it's actually a big positive for them or not is a different matter.

As to what you're missing, if you don't have much interest then you're not missing anything. There is no rule that you have to like every collaboration or every watch. Just like what you like and don't waste any energy trying to understand why some human's are different to you.
This.
 

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The think that drives me crazy is the brands that are constantly releasing new limited editions & special editions, hoping to sucker collectors into buying the same watch over again.

It's like that line from The Incredibles - "When everyone is special, then no one is."

There are very, very few completionist collectors out there in any field of collecting, IMO.

By the same token, the point about the steady stream of such watches means the vast majority are...Just Another Release...is entirely valid. But I also suspect the market prices them accordingly.

Don't treat it as trying to sucker the collectors, as offering up a "well you don't see one like this just every day" kind of appeal. Or to add appeal to people with particular interest in the edition's theme; that's a clear motive for Omega Olympic watches.

Oh, one point of agreement. There are some brands that *do* overplay the "limited edition" card. They make every release a "limited edition"...when in reality they probably are just buying a batch of N, particularly dials, that'll take a long time to sell in any event, and trying to sucker you into thinking there's extra value. I can't recall seeing a brand like this linking up with a dealer or blog off the top of my head, tho...most of these are direct-sale brands.
 
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TBH, the Hodinkee/Heuer Skipperera is the one collaboration that I would love to own.

However, that is really the exception to the rule - while I can appreciate the idea and the design elements that go into their collaborations, I would not otherwise purchase one.
 

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The think that drives me crazy is the brands that are constantly releasing new limited editions & special editions, hoping to sucker collectors into buying the same watch over again.
Hahaha suckers always fall for it too -- buying stuff they want because they want it. Such idiots!

Pro tip: People who buy something you wouldn't buy aren't necessarily suckers.
 

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I think this is too early to tell. For some Hodinkee collaboration models, they are quite cool and unique. For example, the Heuer Skipper. Right now, it seems cool to be associated with Hodinkee.

Hodinkee is positioning itself as a leader in horology scholarship and providing thought leadership in the watch industry. It remains to be seen how this is perceived in 10-20 years. Assuming that Hodinkee becomes truly regarded as an indisputable leader in trends and thought leadership for watches, this can give legitimacy to the brands that have collaborations with Hodinkee. Of course, this would appeal to only a small group of watch-buyers but this is also the group that has the buying power to drive up prices in auction.

From this perspective, its good for brands to be associated with Hodinkee as Hodinkee can lend legitimacy in the long run.
 

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It took Hodinkee 10 years to get to where they are now. I am not surprised their watches get sold out quickly given the affluent customer base. Their success is vastly dependent upon their brand's goodwill. Is it worth it? That depends on how you measure it. It's still a young company and anything could happen. Even established companies like D&G can still get it very wrong.
 

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It's also part marketing and brand awareness. A limited edition release means that the brand's name will show up a bit more during that time on watch media.
 

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1) They are very limited, compared to the usual LE #'s of the X brand
2) They are a big source of news when it comes to watches = followers, easily market their products and create hype
3) They can sell, hence the power to having collaborations with big brands
4) Resale, they are doing very well
5) For X brand, its pure marketing, creating hype around their brand, and staying relevant in the game
6) What Hodinkee have achieved is something to admire and respect, a lot of hard work and time went into that company.

Are the watches worth it? Its upto you to decide.
 
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