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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Just don't get drunk and think chucking your hand drill to the crown is a stroke of genius and you should be fine. (Don't ask how I know).
I have literally imagined doing that so many times. Or doing it to the crown and putting it in position to set the time and watching the hands whirl around the dial with incredible speed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I do sometimes wish I had an auto with a power reserve. Being a New Yorker and a dog owner my Fitbit counts 20-25k steps a day. I often wondered is my watch always fully wound from all my movement?
 

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I have literally imagined doing that so many times. Or doing it to the crown and putting it in position to set the time and watching the hands whirl around the dial with incredible speed.
Just add enough beverage ethanol and Bob's yer uncle, mi amigo.
 

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As mentioned earlier, winding the watch on the wrist can damage the movement, but if the watch is taken off to be wound, nothing should happen.
However, it should (hopefully) be known that the tension of the mainspring affects the accuracy of the watch. A good watchmaker will therefore regulate an automatic watch differently (with full mainspring tension) than a manually wound watch (mainspring only half tensioned).
 
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As long as you don't use this.
Tool Metal Fashion accessory Titanium Drawing
 

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I do sometimes wish I had an auto with a power reserve. Being a New Yorker and a dog owner my Fitbit counts 20-25k steps a day. I often wondered is my watch always fully wound from all my movement?
Yes, it is always fully wound. I have a watch with the ETA 2897 movement with power reserve indicator. I don't have a dog and I sit in the car a lot for work, so I don't move nearly as much as you do and the display doesn't fall under fully wound for me in everyday life.
 

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...I do sometimes wish I had an auto with a power reserve. Being a New Yorker and a dog owner my Fitbit counts 20-25k steps a day. I often wondered is my watch always fully wound from all my movement?...
Yeah, if you know what the rated power reserve of the watch is, eg; 40 hours, you can just check on how long it runs if you have put it in a drawer when you switched it out for another watch. If I put away my BB58, I am always amazed that I can pick it up 2-3 days later and it is still running, all from just the auto wind function.
 

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Can you over wind a mechanical watch though? I’ve wondered if it’s possible and get a bit hesitant to manually wind my autos too much when getting them started. Usually go about 20-30 winds of the crown when drained, and then just wear it to charge.
 

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For the ones who manually wind your automatics, I'm curious what movement you guys have in your watches.

I have a Sinn 104 with a SW 220-1. Until a week ago I would hand wind the watch every other day or so with 10 winds or so. Last week I noticed that when I held the watch face down with it parallel to the floor that the rotor would spin whenever I turn the crown. This did not happen before. I would definitely have noticed this if it happened beforehand because I'm a little anal when it comes to having things operate properly, at least mechanical things.

I research this on youtube and found this video that shows the problem around the 1:05 mins mark. It seems that this can be caused by insufficient lubrication, a dirty movement that needs to be serviced or the reversor wheels are not working properly. Since the movement is similiar to the ETA in the video, it seems like the causes for the problem would be similar.

I contacted Watchbuys, Sinn's AD in the US, and will be sending it in for repair which is covered under the warranty. Just wanted to share this with everyone.
 

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Not sure about that watch but for my 6497, 98, and ST3600 equivalents I just wind the crown 15-18 twists in the morning. That usually results in ~35-40 hours. ~23 turns is the end point where the mainspring coils tap out. I have carefully wound them this much before, just to get feel where the end point is. I don't do that regularly though, just to play it safe.

Every once in a blue moon I will wind them on my wrist. But its usually no more than a few turns just to get through the day when I forget to wind them in the morning. I am careful to bend my wrist down so I dont damage the crown.
 

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Can you over wind a mechanical watch though? I’ve wondered if it’s possible and get a bit hesitant to manually wind my autos too much when getting them started. Usually go about 20-30 winds of the crown when drained, and then just wear it to charge.
A hand-wound watch can be overwound, an automatic cannot, because the mainspring of the automatic is equipped with a slipping clutch.
 

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A hand-wound watch can be overwound, an automatic cannot, because the mainspring of the automatic is equipped with a slipping clutch.
Beat me to it by seconds. I thought some or all automatics had a clutch. The designers know/hope that the human winding a manual will have some idea of when to stop, but an automatic just keeps moving that rotor, so it needs a clutch.
 

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Not sure about that watch but for my 6497, 98, and ST3600 equivalents I just wind the crown 15-18 twists in the morning. That usually results in ~35-40 hours. ~23 turns is the end point where the mainspring coils tap out.
May I ask why you don't wind the watch completely? To be on the safe side, do you always fill up your car only to three-quarters full too?
 
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Wind it once a day, or if it has a long PR then every 2-3 days.

For two reasons, 90% of the issues I have had with watches in the last 40 years have been with crowns and stems. So the less you have to unscrew them and wind them the better IMO.

Also you increase the risk of your mind being elsewhere and winding it past the stop causing damage to the mainspring, so all in all why would you want to?
 

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Okay, the gist of what I'm reading is...

- The mainspring in a manual wind has a hard limit; so when you hit that limit, you'll feel it in the crown, and you should stop.

- Self-winding mainsprings have a slip bridle which prevents overwinding.

But I still have questions:

- Are the keyless works in autos made differently than the ones in manuals? Are the gears made stronger in manual-wound movements? There's threads about how 2824s don't take kindly to frequent hand-winding because the gears aren't designed to tolerate it.

- What about wear n' tear on the crown tube gaskets?
-- "Armchair engineering" this: for a manual wind, isn't the number of turns to a full wind pretty much the same no matter when you wind it? So fidgeting with it to wind from 80% to 100% four times a day isn't any different from winding it from 20% to 100% just once?

- Given that gasket/O-ring replacement should be part of a standard service anyway, regularly hand-winding won't matter here unless you never service the watch... right?
 

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There's threads about how 2824s don't take kindly to frequent hand-winding because the gears aren't designed to tolerate it.
With reservation: The main problem with excessive manual winding of the ETA 2824 is the wear of the ratchet wheels, respectively their bearing pins due to an unfortunate material pairing. These ratchet wheels decouple the manual winding from the rotor drive of the automatic. Since pure hand-wound movements do not have a rotor, the ratchet wheels and their bearing pins are of course also omitted here, and thus also this problem area.

-- "Armchair engineering" this: for a manual wind, isn't the number of turns to a full wind pretty much the same no matter when you wind it? So fidgeting with it to wind from 80% to 100% four times a day isn't any different from winding it from 20% to 100% just once?
In principle, this is correct, however, the variant with the four times a day wind the problem with the rate deviation already described above, because hand-wound watches are regulated at about 50% mainspring tension. It is best to wind a hand-wound watch once a day and always fully at, if possible, about the same time and otherwise keep your fingers off the crown.
 
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I once read that its best to hand wind the watch by turning the crown in one direction and not ratcheting backwards as the ratchet and pawl are wearable items that do not have to be worn.
 

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I asked my watchmaker about this, and he said it is fine.

I think I can trust his knowledge since I trust him to service my prized pieces.

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I once read that its best to hand wind the watch by turning the crown in one direction and not ratcheting backwards as the ratchet and pawl are wearable items that do not have to be worn.
That's kind of like the debate whether or not to press the release button while pulling up a car handbrake. I do it without thinking as a matter of habit mostly because I don't like the noise it makes.
 
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