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An AUTOMATIC is a mechanical movement, it just winds up from movement, instead of manually.
You are correct. They are both mechanical. What I meant was that you can wind an automatic all you want but you will damage a manual wind mechanical if you wind past it's limit.
 

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In principle, this is correct, however, the variant with the four times a day wind the problem with the rate deviation already described above, because hand-wound watches are regulated at about 50% mainspring tension. It is best to wind a hand-wound watch once a day and always fully at, if possible, about the same time and otherwise keep your fingers off the crown.
But as far as the O-rings in the crown tube are concerned, does it matter?

For me, component failure is more of a concern than exact accuracy. I never expect my mechanical watches to be wholly accurate anyway.
 

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That's kind of like the debate whether or not to press the release button while pulling up a car handbrake. I do it without thinking as a matter of habit mostly because I don't like the noise it makes.
The article went on to state that not only does ratcheting backwards cause wear to the ratchet and pawl mechanism, the microscopic metal fragments that come off the corners of the ratchet mechanism can act as an abrasive and wear other components of the watch.
 

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You know, this isn't that dumb of a question. I've seen a number of watch blogs talking about handwound watches saying about how one should "wind them up once a day, such as before bedtime." It always seemed to imply one could only wind it once a day. The last time I had a handwound watch, I wound it before going to bed and after waking up.
I think this is the most logical advice, though I do wind my Speedmaster a few Times during the day without removing it from my wrist. My Speedmaster is 20 years old, purchased new by me and worn in rotation with other watches so actual wearing time is more like a year or less actually on the wrist. I wouldn’t be concerned but it is probably best to simply remove the watch from the wrist to wind it if you are concerned. FWIW I hated meetings…
 

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You know, this isn't that dumb of a question. I've seen a number of watch blogs talking about handwound watches saying about how one should "wind them up once a day, such as before bedtime." It always seemed to imply one could only wind it once a day. The last time I had a handwound watch, I wound it before going to bed and after waking up.
Yep - I've been doing that for 16 years and haven't had any issues.
For those who think that keeping their watch running all the time is damaging - do you also take the batteries out of your quartz watches so they don't run all the time?
In my opinion, while there's obviously some "wear and tear" on any mechanism that is used continuously, a watch is designed to minimize that wear so if you want to keep it running all the time it doesn't cause undue problems (unless something goes wrong internally, which can happen to any mechanical device).
 

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For those who think that keeping their watch running all the time is damaging - do you also take the batteries out of your quartz watches so they don't run all the time?
It has nothing to do with running all the time. It's about turning the stem (and the associated geartrain on the near side of the mainspring) frequently.
 

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The only difference on the mainspring is that its end is connected to the spring barrel wall on the hand wound version so that you feel a stop when the spring is fully wound, while the automatic version has a spring end that can slide along the barrel wall when the rotor keeps on winding.
...... and that's why although you can't "wind too often", you can overwind a manual wind movement, which is what I was referring to but didn't explain appropriately.
 

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It has nothing to do with running all the time. It's about turning the stem (and the associated geartrain on the near side of the mainspring) frequently.
Makes sense. But as long as you do that carefully (i.e. - not on your wrist), and there aren't any internal mechanical problems, it shouldn't introduce any problems. Or at least it never has for me.
 

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A little late to the party. I remember years ago there was lots of talk about issues with fully manually winding ETA auto movements. You can google it and find all manner of opinions and descriptions of why it’s bad or not. The problem is I’m not qualified in any way to separate the truth from the fiction (friction?).

Ultimately I came to the following conclusion: The need to fully handwind an automatic watch is just a form of interaction. It’s not necessary. I’m not qualified to determine if it is harmful or not. I just read a bunch of opinions of watch nerds. (And let’s be honest. Most of you are nutters). If it’s even possible it’s damaging the watch, it’s not worth doing. So I give my autos a wind or two to get it started and strap it on. No need to concern myself further with this issue.
 

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Speaking of overwinding a manual wind watch, I read somewhere that an automatic watch can also be overwound by too much movement in a bad watch winder box. But I think that's a bit of nonsense since there are mechanisms that can declutch the oscillator after a certain point. Going back to the original OP, I think manual winding to perhaps 3/4 of a full wind on a daily basis is safe to minimize the main spring from being under tight mechanical stress while having enough power reserve to frequently operate the chronograph complication of the OP's speedmaster.
 

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I remember years ago there was lots of talk about issues with fully manually winding ETA auto movements.
Only the ETA 2824 movements and their direct relatives ETA 2826 and ETA 2836 are affected by this problem. I don't know if the problem is also present on the Sellita SW 200, but it is certain that the ETA 2892 family (ETA 2893, ETA 2895, ETA 2896 and ETA 2897) is not affected.

I read somewhere that an automatic watch can also be overwound by too much movement in a bad watch winder box.
No, that is technically not possible.
 
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I feel a little silly asking this question but I got thinking about it wearing my speedmaster and my reverso a lot lately. Both are hand wound watches. I find that as I sit on calls or in meetings I start winding my watch. What this ultimately leads to is the watch getting wound after maybe running only a few hours. Obviously I do not force it just wind it till it stops.

My question is is it bad for the spring to not let it completely unwind? I have many watches and they run themselves to the end weekly or so since I am constantly switching out. I am just wondering what the best practice is?
As long as it doesn't become a compulsion and you stop winding up as soon as you feel any minimal resistance, I don't see a problem. Some say you should not fully wind the SW200-1 often, but just a few turns and then just let the rotor do the work, but your question refers to manual wind movements only, so they are designed exactly for frequent winding. I usually wind it with it off the wrist, so as not to force too much the crown stem laterally thus avoiding load on and wearing out the components of the winding mechanism.
 

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On Ask Hodinkee I think, or some such, someone asked if a mainspring has a finite or indefinite service life. Answer, all metal goes through metal fatigue, so mainsprings will eventually weaken. However, modern alloys are much better than they used to be, and mainsprings last a long time. It's standard practice to replace a mainspring during service anyway. So my takeaway, don't worry about it.

This got me to thinking thought, is my handwind Nomos, which runs down for a day before I wind it again, subjected to more metal fatigue my Grand Seiko, which hardly runs down at all? It's all idle musing, and I don't know if there's any rigorous empirical evidence, so at the end of the day the takeaway is still, don't worry about it.

Well, not so fast because that depends. I was under that impression too but I was proven wrong. Constant full wind of an automatic can damage a movement.
How?
In reference to an automatic, unless you have a power reserve meter how would you know at any given time the % of wind?
It appears that unless that your watch is involved in a lot of physical movement you are probably never reaching a full wind, which I now know is the norm.
My Grand Seiko has a power reserve indicator, and I wear it enough that it hardly budges from full. It might sometimes run down to like a third (one day). It tops off remarkably quickly, like within an hour or two. I never wind it.
 

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But as far as the O-rings in the crown tube are concerned, does it matter?

For me, component failure is more of a concern than exact accuracy. I never expect my mechanical watches to be wholly accurate anyway.
Not a watch engineer, but I would guess that the rated lifespan of components like crown seals assumes that the watches are wound fully (X turns of the crown to full charge), so winding less frequently (= not fully) only marginally prolongs the life of those components in comparison to possibly significantly reducing accuracy.
 

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Just don't get drunk and think chucking your hand drill to the crown is a stroke of genius and you should be fine. (Don't ask how I know).
I have a fake rolex and I was looking for a fun way to kill it.... Thank you.
 
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