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...... and that's why although you can't "wind too often", you can overwind a manual wind movement, which is what I was referring to but didn't explain appropriately.
Okay, I might have misunderstood your post.

Anyways, damaging a hand wound movement by winding more than you should is really hard. I don't even know if the mains spring hook would break first or if you'd shear off the crown stem before that happens. Still, either would take more brute force than anyone in his right mind would use on a crown.
 

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It's unecassary wear and tear. You'll get a lot more life out of it, if you just wind once a day.
Why?

Assuming it's a hand wound watch, what difference does it make if you wind once from 50% to 100% or five times from 90% to 100%? The total number of cranks on the crown is exactly the same in both cases.
 

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Well, not so fast because that depends. I was under that impression too but I was proven wrong. Constant full wind of an automatic can damage a movement.
I was under the opposite impression. Manual winding movements could be damaged when overwound, and so there's a physical resistance to dissuade the user to go beyond full winding.

Such mechanism is inapplicable for a rotor, which by definition would keep winding the mainspring as long as the user keeps moving. So there's a failsafe which prevents the mainspring from additional winding when fully wound.

And so you can't overwind an automatic ; but if someone was dumb enough to force past the resistance of a manual winding watch, this scenario would become possible. 👼

Automatic movement with hand winding capability or manually wound movement makes no difference. The function of the basic movement, the springs used, etc. are exactly the same. . (...) The only difference on the mainspring is that its end is connected to the spring barrel wall on the hand wound version so that you feel a stop when the spring is fully wound, while the automatic version has a spring end that can slide along the barrel wall when the rotor keeps on winding.
Well that's another significant difference, isn't it ? Such a mechanism would protect the automatic version from being overwound. :)

In reference to an automatic, unless you have a power reserve meter how would you know at any given time the % of wind?
It appears that unless that your watch is involved in a lot of physical movement you are probably never reaching a full wind, which I now know is the norm.
You could know by tracking the accuracy of your automatic, as it would tend to be faster at full winding, and slower when approaching the end of the power reserve. There's an information on Seiko's automatics users manual about such behavior, among others. My 6R35 for example, when fully wound (by the crown) and rested horizontally can reach +10 spd ; while when mostly unwound it can fall as low as -20 spd in the same position.
Also, I'd say that when manually winding an automatic, the resistance of the crown could feel lower when the mainspring is mostly unwound.

That's why I'd agree with your second proposition, as when only relying on the rotor, I do obtain intermediate performances. Which means most of the time my automatic isn't fully wound. :)
Can you over wind a mechanical watch though? I’ve wondered if it’s possible and get a bit hesitant to manually wind my autos too much when getting them started. Usually go about 20-30 winds of the crown when drained, and then just wear it to charge.
Both automatics and manual winding watches are mechanicals. Modern automatics all have protections against overwinding, so you couldn't overwind them even if you wanted.
You are correct. They are both mechanical. What I meant was that you can wind an automatic all you want but you will damage a manual wind mechanical if you wind past it's limit.
My point exactly. :)
 

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Well that's another significant difference, isn't it ? Such a mechanism would protect the automatic version from being overwound. :)
This mechanism does prevent automatic watches from being over-wound.

On a hand wound watch, it's neither necessary nor practical. Breaking a hand wound watch by winding past the stop point requires far more force than anyone in their right mind would use on a watch crown (if you have some disposable hand wound movement somewhere, try it!). It's a non-issue. Seriously.

Not knowing when to stop on the other hand would lead to a lot of unnecessary wear and tear. The fear of winding too little would make most people wind far too much.
 

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Nope, for manual-wind watches like the speedy, it's designed with this in consideration. No need to reset.
Just don't wind it while on wrist when bored, this puts forces/ stresses on the crown/ stem that they're not designed to handle.
 

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No.
 

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When you say constant “full wind” are you talking about manually winding the automatic, or the auto being constantly fully wound due to wrist activity?


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I'll find the link to the thread so you can see the images showing damage from winding.
Read # 29 ...... Aquis 400 - power reserve issue
You may want to read the entire thread but pay special attention to Archer (Watchmaker) Lots of good information
 
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In what way?



When worn, automatic watches wind the mainspring faster than it unwinds through the gear train. Otherwise it wouldn't work and the watch would even run out of steam while you wear it, let alone when you store it over night. It's completely normal that an automatic watch with ~40h power reserve winds the mainspring fully within 6-10 hours. So while it's on your wrist, it winds 4-5 times faster than it unwinds, even when you're not super active.
I never gave the amount of wind much thought until I read this thread
Daily activities are going to determine how much your automatic winds on it's own. A watch with a power reserve indicator can give you good insight.
I'll tell you this, unless you're very active that 40h power reserve watch may not fully wind in 10 hours.
 

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In what way?
Read # 29 .....https://www.watchuseek.com/threads/aquis-400-power-reserve-issue.5263510/page-2#post-52941361
 

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I'll find the link to the thread so you can see the images showing damage from winding.
Read # 29 ...... Aquis 400 - power reserve issue
You may want to read the entire thread but pay special attention to Archer (Watchmaker) Lots of good information
Thank you!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Read # 29 .....https://www.watchuseek.com/threads/aquis-400-power-reserve-issue.5263510/page-2#post-52941361
That post has nothing to do with normally wearing an automatic watch. It's about watch winders that were set to wind far more than required, causing the spring to slip along the barrel wall almost 24/7, for no good reason. Yeah, of course this sort of abuse will eventually lead to excessive wear and tear.
 

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That post has nothing to do with normally wearing an automatic watch. It's about watch winders that were set to wind far more than required, causing the spring to slip along the barrel wall almost 24/7, for no good reason. Yeah, of course this sort of abuse will eventually lead to excessive wear and tear.
[/ ]

Incorrect, may be off topic for the op but there's a lot of very good information there.

The original post is about a watch winder but the information about winding automatics is an eye opener.
Even though there is a slip mechanism once the movement is fully wound it will eventually cause failure.
Yes, it is designed to slip, but it slips at a cost as pointed out by Archer.

A good watch winder is designed to maintain the state of wind that your watch is in when placed on the winder, Not to wind it further which will bring it to a full wind where the constant slipping will cause excessive wear.
 

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Even though there is a slip mechanism once the movement is fully wound it will eventually cause failure.
Yes, it is designed to slip, but it slips at a cost as pointed out by Archer.
Yes, but you won't reach that point by moving your arm or by cranking the crown with your fingers. Unless you do it on purpose and wind it for many hours (which is something a winder will do without complaining, but normal humans wouldn't).
 

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On a hand wound watch, it's neither necessary nor practical. Breaking a hand wound watch by winding past the stop point requires far more force than anyone in their right mind would use on a watch crown (if you have some disposable hand wound movement somewhere, try it!). It's a non-issue. Seriously.
I used to think this, but had a different experience with my Hamilton Khaki (2804-2), broke the mainspring one night while winding vigorously. I’m no ham-handed brute, just was a bit careless. Now I count turns and know when I’m approaching full wind.


Having a great time….
 
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