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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I hate scratches on my watches and currently have a perfect EZM 1 and a very good 156 that is being refurbed/serviced to as new with Sinn. But no matter how you baby your watches scratches on the watch/clasp are inevitable.

Anybody had any success with these?

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=180066025772&sspagename=ADME:L:RTQ:US:1

and for Titanium...

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...MESE:IT&viewitem=&item=180040388044&rd=1&rd=1

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...MESE:IT&viewitem=&item=180040394125&rd=1&rd=1

Thanks David
 

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IIRC, most if not all of Sinn's Ti models feature sand-blasted finishes. None of those 'solutions' you have identified will give you the remedy you seek. You'd be better off living with the scratch/ding/nick. Using those pads/scratch pens would only make matters worse by literally making the troubled area bigger and more prominent.

However, if its satin or brushed finishes, with these 'tools', you're in luck! I use them regularly on my brushed bracelets and clasps to great effect! :-! Likewise for the Cape Cod cloths for high polished surfaces; nothing beats them.

Regards,
w a y
 

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Discussion Starter #3
IIRC, most if not all of Sinn's Ti models feature sand-blasted finishes. None of those 'solutions' you have identified will give you the remedy you seek. You'd be better off living with the scratch/ding/nick. Using those pads/scratch pens would only make matters worse by literally making the troubled area bigger and more prominent.

However, if its satin or brushed finishes, with these 'tools', you're in luck! I use them regularly on my brushed bracelets and clasps to great effect! :-! Likewise for the Cape Cod cloths for high polished surfaces; nothing beats them.

Regards,
w a y

Thanks for the reply. I've not ever managed to get my head around the different finishes - what is the different between satin and as sand-blasted? That said, never really thought about it!

Anyway...so you wouldn't use one of these on your EZM 1?

Thanks David
 

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Anyway...so you wouldn't use one of these on your EZM 1?
I wouldn't risk it - I've used them on polished steel and they work a treat, but you wouldn't want polished patches on your EZM!

I would either wait until you get it serviced, or if it's in a bad way, there are some specialists who could probably sort it.

I think the Sinn 'satin' finish is sandblasted, which IIRC is 'smaller' than beat-blasting so gives a shinier finish (but still diffuse, not polished).
 

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Over the years I have seen a number of explanations for "satin", from fine beadblast to non-directional brushing.

Any takers for a definitive solution to the problem?
 

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I recently purchased the polishing sponge for titanium cases that is being offered by bostonwatchexchange (the first link for titanium watches) to touch up the lugs on my 103 Ti Ar UTC. Unfortunately, I haven't gotten around to trying it yet.
 

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You cannot repair a bead- or sand-blasted finish without expensive equipment and media that match the original factory choices. You cannot spot-repair such damage, either. The whole part has to be redone.

Blasting means the metal is bombarded with tiny balls of material, that leave a matte grey finish. No lines. Some folks call that satin, but it's a non-reflective, non-directional finish. The surface is basically pitted, on a microscopic level, so light is reflected in a diffuse manner. It also means the metal is more likely to corrode or stain, because of the increased surface area of the pitted surface.

Satin or brushed finishes are exactly that -- a fine abrasive is used to scratch the surface of the metal, in ONE direction, leaving a visible line pattern, and a less reflective surface than a bright-polished finish. You can repair such finishes using matching abrasive brushes or "sandpaper." Bergeon also sells a glass-fiber scratch brush, which looks like the item in your links. But using anything like that takes great care and practice, or you'll make it worse. Most proper refinishing means taking the item apart. The brushes are really hard to use, and can easily make things far worse.

Bright-finished "polished" surfaces have lines, too, but they're really microscopic and not visible to the naked eye.

Polishes don't really work well on metal that has been brush or satin finished, because the grit level of the polish almost never is right, and the Cape Cod stuff is polish in cloth that is hard to control for one direction. If you want to restore a bright polished finish (no lines), you can and should use various levels of grit in polish. Sometimes you can match the original grain by trying out various levels of abrasives, such as 1000-1500-2000 grit you see with metal-working papers. I've regularly used MicroSurface abrasive fabrics to repair scratches on the visible part of deployment clasps, but that's a small part, and you have to do the whole part over at once -- and it's not a watch case with multi-faceted machining! You can do this on bracelets, too, if you're very careful to mask parts and have hours to spend.

If you polish a satin surface (or any surface), you'll be removing some of the surface, which is what any polish does. You may be adding some new scratches in the direction you want, but you will not end up with the original finish, unless the original finish was done in the same way as the repair.

On close inspection, the Cape Cod stuff doesn't bear up to a finicky standard, IMHO.
 

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I have tried the cape cod - and have used erasers (for brushing) on my watches... and they all don't work well on the sinn bead finished. Ti watches also don't take the treatment well although with time, they "recover" from the cleaning when its colour darkens..
The brushing method works on matt brushed finishes though
 

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Hi there,

Having spent the last 5 yrs refinishing watches for myself and for loyal customers. I've learnt what works and what doesn't, the so called easy solutions, don't really work, well they do from a distance but not upon close inspection, which I know as my Customers will examine my work in fine detail, and would inform me immediately if not upto par.

Here's an Example, local guy sends me Tutima, as he's bashed the case


Watch after prep work and Sandblasting


Regs

Bry @SatinTimeUK pardon the pun
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hi there,

Having spent the last 5 yrs refinishing watches for myself and for loyal customers. I've learnt what works and what doesn't, the so called easy solutions, don't really work, well they do from a distance but not upon close inspection, which I know as my Customers will examine my work in fine detail, and would inform me immediately if not upto par.

Here's an Example, local guy sends me Tutima, as he's bashed the case
Regs

Bry @SatinTimeUK pardon the pun
Well thats that then! No need to bother - now that I know you are UK based, that's great, I'll just wait for the watch to be refurbed properly and then send it to to you. Great stuff and thanks David
 

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Hi David,

You see it makes a difference putting your location on you pro, I should check my pro. I have refinished Sinns before in the past, like a Sinn Ezm 2 and a Sinn 142 galvanised, for a fellow Sinn watchuseek forummer. I've worked on a wide range of watches really, from Seikos thro to a Rare Royal Navy/Marine Omega SM300, to Dreadnoughts, alsorts!




Regs

Bry
 

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You see it makes a difference putting your location on you pro[file]
One of the things that keep amazing me as moderator is members asking for local/regional ressources without disclosing their location in either their profile, or at least in the post. :think:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hi David,

You see it makes a difference putting your location on you pro, I should check my pro. I have refinished Sinns before in the past, like a Sinn Ezm 2 and a Sinn 142 galvanised, for a fellow Sinn watchuseek forummer. I've worked on a wide range of watches really, from Seikos thro to a Rare Royal Navy/Marine Omega SM300, to Dreadnoughts, alsorts!
Regs

Bry

Many thanks! Profiles - Gosh it's just not something I would think about really. But good point and taken! Cheers David
 

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If you're in the USA and need work done to refinish a case or bracelet that's bead-blasted, contact International Watch Works: http://www.angelfire.com/blues/andcameysiww/Firstpage.html

They enjoy a deservedly great reputation for refurbishing or refinishing watches. I've had them bead-blast a stainless steel single-fold deployant to match a Sinn 356 matte-finish case, and the work was done perfectly, speedily, and at a fair price. So nicely done that I had another prepared as a spare.
 

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If you have a bright-polished surface, and there are some surface markings from normal wear (the kind of randomly sourced lines you cannot feel with a fingernail), then you can use Flitz metal polish and a 100% cotton flannel cloth to polish out the metal. Flitz contains no abrasives; the polishing action is chemical. I've successfully rebrightened metal of all sorts with that stuff. If there's a slightly deeper marking, it can likely polish that out, too.

It can be used on brushed satin surfaces to make them shinier, but it will remove some of the texturing from the brushing. Used enough, it will likely remove most of it, so be careful if you use it for that purpose. It will also remove an AR coating from a crystal.

Most other metal polishes contain abrasives or much stronger chemical action (or both).
 

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Hi; Forget the polishing cloths, get a Sinn with the Tegimented finish.

Especially the black PVD. I have been wearing my 856S, and to a lesser extent my 756D, for years, and ther's not a mark on either one of them. This Tegiment thing really works.
 

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Question about using a cape cod cloth on the polished surface of the sinn 103...the bracelet I'm getting is preowned and had its fair share of marks. Can I use the cape cod cloth on the polished sections of the bracelet? I'm not looking for brand new- just a cleaner look. As for the satin links on the bracelet, if I use the cape cod cloth will it remove the satin finish? Would I be better off just leaving it as is if I'm not willing to pay to have it done and I don't want to screw it up? ;-)

Thanks!
 

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A cape cod will help the polished areas but you will want to tape off the brushed areas. You could also just brush the whole bracelet. Easy to do yourself. Don't use a Scotchbrite though. Those 4 or 3 sided nail buffers work well pulled in one direction with a straight edge.
 
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