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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
I do a bit of contract flying and one of the most important functions of a watch (to me, at least), is having a dedicated GMT/UTC subdial. We file our own flight plans and make position reports, ETA's, ETD's, etc in UTC. + the half hour timezone is important.
I've used my trusty titanium Skyhawk (0010-50E) which served me well, but it hasn't taken a beating well. So scratched and dinged up, the bezel has fallen off, crystal has been cracked, displays have gone blank, seconds hand has frozen , etc.
I really like the PMV65-2271, but it is far too expensive and no matter what they are advertised as, will not last in harsh/trying conditions.

Hence, enter the G-Shocks : GW-A1000 and the GA-1000.
To me, the GA is infinitely more usability for an actual pilot than does the GW-A, yes?
On the former, you cannot view UTC or any other function without losing the current time? And do you have to keep fiddling with the crown (like the Skyhawks..quite a pain in reality) to change modes, rather than a simple button push on the GA?
Also, how much of a "lack" is the absence of a tough movement or the solar function?
 

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I think a digital with multi-lines display will be your best tool watch, analog watches make good nostalgia but they are not as pratical as their digital counterparts, isn't it true that today's aircrafts have glass cockpit and fly-by-wire control system ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's a point..but I do like having the analog bit.
On the 2nd point, they do..but a UTC subdial comes into it's own when we sometimes visit the places we do. More for planning purposes. Is it a necessity? No. But nice to have instead of counting UTC up or down on your fingers.
 

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ap10046,

Does it have to be necessarily an analog watch? I agree with lvt that a full digital watch might be the better choice if maximum functionality comes first, although nothing beats an anlog for telling quickly the time, especially when things get a little shaky...


cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi Cal,
No it doesn't have to be analog at all..its just that "I Want" thing....
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Also, can anyone clarify if the GW-A can 1 button push swith to UTC? Doesn't the RAF version have a Z on the bottom right pusher? Would this suggest a 1 push Zulu?
I've seen this mentioned numerous times but would like a clarification.
 

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You should get the 7710. Though it's full digital it has three time zones on the display without you needing to fidget with it.
 

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For me, doing intercont flights all the time, i find the GW3500 good for ana/ digi simultaneous view. It lacks am/ pm indi tho, so sometimes its more convenient to go fully digital for a quicker read. I want the day and date to be displayed 24/7, so i tend to use my PRW-2500 more and more because of these reasons. Being away from home with up to 12hrs timezone diff, i really dont wanna have to press some buttons to find out if its day or night when i wake up in a dark hotelroom somewhere. This might sound kinda silly to most people, but it is annoying when you travel a lot for a living.

Also, the PRW have moonphase and baro tendencies. Baro info mostly used during layovers for outdoor avtivities planning, and moonphase used when planning nightflights (will we be able to see the top of clouds in the moonlight, or will it be pitch black, having to rely on the weatherradar only?).

Also just loves the atomic and solar. Worryfree usage is the keyword for me. Backlight is really handy aswell.
The compass also comes in handy during layovers. I use it more than i thought i would.

So, its basically a layover watch. When on the flightdeck, i have all info avbl to me from other sources. Always make me wonder what pilots do with their "pilotwatches" when flying. Timers, conversionbezels and such might maybe be useful for bushflying or similar, but for airline flying there is no need at all, other than maybe the esthetical factor.

Just my five cents.
 

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Also, can anyone clarify if the GW-A can 1 button push swith to UTC? Doesn't the RAF version have a Z on the bottom right pusher? Would this suggest a 1 push Zulu?
I've seen this mentioned numerous times but would like a clarification.

Z means zulu time, that's correct, but I remember from a review article, the button only works after you entered the world time mode then you press the button for a couple of second to see the zulu time, it doesn't give you a quick direct access to zulu time.
 

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Z means zulu time, that's correct, but I remember from a review article, the button only works after you entered the world time mode then you press the button for a couple of second to see the zulu time, it doesn't give you a quick direct access to zulu time.
You can switch quickly to UTC with one press of the mode button if you just have your world time set to UTC. You can quick switch back to normal timekeeping by holding the mode button, which works in every mode.

The zulu button works in world time mode as a 'quick reset to UTC' if you were set to a different time zone without you having to fiddle with the crown.

Whilst these features work pretty quickly and the crown is pretty intuitive to use on these smart access models compared to other analogue watches, an ana-digi or all digital would still be able to display info faster :)

Sent from the 'droid.
 

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You can switch quickly to UTC with one press of the mode button if you just have your world time set to UTC

In this case my Riseman can perform far better, if I set the world time to UTC a simple press on the up-right button will give me the UTC time immediately, a longer press on the same button will switch the time between the home city and world time and vice versa.
 

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Hence, enter the G-Shocks : GW-A1000 and the GA-1000.
To me, the GA is infinitely more usability for an actual pilot than does the GW-A, yes?
On the former, you cannot view UTC or any other function without losing the current time?
Correct, GWA1000 doesn't have dual time. The top subdial is for 24 hr time. Other aviators like GW3000, GW4000, GW2500, and GW3500 have the dual time in the sub dial.
And do you have to keep fiddling with the crown (like the Skyhawks..quite a pain in reality) to change modes, rather than a simple button push on the GA?
No, the mode change on GWA1000 is from left button just like typical G-Shock. The crown is for setting.
Also, how much of a "lack" is the absence of a tough movement or the solar function?
For me, it's not much. The cool neon illuminator light edges those.
 

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What about low light visibility?

Personally I find analogues easier to read in low light (not pressing backlight of course). Better time-at-a-glance.
 

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In this case my Riseman can perform far better, if I set the world time to UTC a simple press on the up-right button will give me the UTC time immediately, a longer press on the same button will switch the time between the home city and world time and vice versa.
Yes, true, other models like the GW-6900 can have dual time displayed instead of the day/date with a touch of a button as well...hence I summarised that any ana-digi or all digital watch would be able to show you the info much quicker and/or at the same time.

Just so you know as well, Casio's newer 'Smart-Access' all-analogue models are the 'fastest' analogues to date, because the hands can move on independent motors simultaneously, however when switching modes/between time zones, it typically takes about 5 seconds for the hands to adjust; whereas digitals are pretty much instantaneous. You'll have to factor this in with the A1000 because it would take about 8-10 seconds for you to switch time to glance at UTC then switch back to your timezone. Whereas on a digital or dual display ana-digi it would take about 2 seconds. Mind you, compare this to a more traditional single motor analogue, it would take ages for the hands to get into position when switching modes, like more than 15 seconds!

Then again, I remember reading from another thread (by a pilot as well) that pilots are more familiar with analogues (consistent with all the dials and stuff in the cockpit) and therefore identify with glancing at an analogue display more quickly. The GW-A1000 has an uncluttered, easily readable display and looks very nice aesthetically, however if that extra time zone display is essential then it's not the best choice for you. The GW-3000 series has that dual time display at the 3 o'clock position but it is worth noting it is a 24-hour clock, maybe you'd be used to it, but it takes me a little longer to process it since I'm not used to looking at 24 hour analogue :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks all.
I did consider the PRW5100 for the same reasons that Meridian iterated.
@Daschlag : I did use the 3500 for a few days..found it to be a bit "small....". But was a good watch.
 

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Completely agree with everything you said. I used a PAW-1300 for many many years. Recently I got a Riseman and have been enjoying it tremendously. I do miss the compass function and will probably get the new Rangeman when it comes out.

I find analog models are somewhat complex and sometimes hard to read. It probably depends on what you grew up with. If you are someone who can take a quick glance at a analog watch and know exactly what time it is, then that will work for you. Iif you grew up with digital displays, you probably feel more comfortable with just that.

For me, a digital watch works perfectly. On my Riseman you can push the button to see UTC real quick, or hold the button longer and it switches to UTC and your local time becomes the secondary.

If you are on a layover in a unknown city, the compass does come in handy. Thus I think I will try the new Rangeman.

I do think it's interesting that Casio has watches they call "Aviator" where I find that the ABC watches are much more appropriate to someone who flies. The new Rangeman, depending on how it is set up, might actually become the ideal aviators watch, minus maybe the stereotypical aviator watch looks.


For me, doing intercont flights all the time, i find the GW3500 good for ana/ digi simultaneous view. It lacks am/ pm indi tho, so sometimes its more convenient to go fully digital for a quicker read. I want the day and date to be displayed 24/7, so i tend to use my PRW-2500 more and more because of these reasons. Being away from home with up to 12hrs timezone diff, i really dont wanna have to press some buttons to find out if its day or night when i wake up in a dark hotelroom somewhere. This might sound kinda silly to most people, but it is annoying when you travel a lot for a living.

Also, the PRW have moonphase and baro tendencies. Baro info mostly used during layovers for outdoor avtivities planning, and moonphase used when planning nightflights (will we be able to see the top of clouds in the moonlight, or will it be pitch black, having to rely on the weatherradar only?).

Also just loves the atomic and solar. Worryfree usage is the keyword for me. Backlight is really handy aswell.
The compass also comes in handy during layovers. I use it more than i thought i would.

So, its basically a layover watch. When on the flightdeck, i have all info avbl to me from other sources. Always make me wonder what pilots do with their "pilotwatches" when flying. Timers, conversionbezels and such might maybe be useful for bushflying or similar, but for airline flying there is no need at all, other than maybe the esthetical factor.

Just my five cents.
 

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What about low light visibility?
Personally I find analogues easier to read in low light (not pressing backlight of course). Better time-at-a-glance.
That is true for brands with good lume, like Seiko (specially), Orient and Citizen. Casio, however, falls short in the lume department independent of what the Aviator lovers say - I'm a Casio fanboy to the core, but Casio's lume sucks.
 

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Yes, Casio lume is nothing to call home about. If you want fantastic lume, go with Ball watches. My worldtimer keeps its lume all night long. Wish that Casio could hang some tritium rods on their analog watches.
 
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