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Hi I was wondering if I could get a check on this Rolex Deep Sea D Blue. Let me know if any more pictures are needed. Don't know how good fakes are these days but the date clicks over exactly at 12, and goes back when the time is wound back. Thanks in advance
IMG_3066.JPG IMG_3062.JPG IMG_3063.JPG IMG_3064.JPG IMG_3065.JPG IMG_3068.JPG IMG_3067.JPG
 

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From those pics, looks like the real McCoy.
 

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I'm not too familiar with the DeepSea, however that one seems to hit all the right buttons. Gen Rolex watches typically have some specifics that are hard to nail down, even in the really good fakes. Edge sharpness of the crown, bracelet fit to case, font cut on the bezel, to name a few. If that one is fake, it is REALLY REALLY GOOD.
 

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The date clicks back if you wind it back after midnight? If I understood that correctly that's one way to kill a watch. The Rolex may be different but the date change starts to engage way before midnight to enable it to flip so accuracy and winding it back can damage it. I may be wrong but I would avoid doing that.
 

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I am unconvinced by the tolerances on that clasp

View attachment 9836962

I don't have a Sea Dweller but here's a Milgauss and a Daytona for comparison

View attachment 9836970
Those clasp you show as an example, are very different than the current fliplock style clasps.
The gap between the parts of the clasp in the pictures are normal, due to a little play between the many parts the clasp consists of
 

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They are different yes. I will have to swing by my local AD to check them out but if Rolex has started making clasps with gaps that aren't even parallel then colour me disappointed.

I was not saying the watch is not authentic, just pointing out that apparently uneven tolerances are something I'd want to check out more thoroughly
 

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In the fourth photo, the photo of the inside of the clasp, do the final two letters of GENEVA, VA, look a little too far from the GENE?
 

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In the fourth photo, the photo of the inside of the clasp, do the final two letters of GENEVA, VA, look a little too far from the GENE?
That's an optical illusion. 300 years ago when I was doing typesetting, I learned that some letters (like V) will always look like they are farther away from most other letters (except A) unless the typesetter intentionally mis-spaces it.

Look at the distance between the top of the G and the E, the top of the E and the N and so forth. Now look at the distance between the top of the E and the top of the V. All spaces are the same (as they should be) including the distance between the V and the A
 

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That's an optical illusion. 300 years ago when I was doing typesetting, I learned that some letters (like V) will always look like they are farther away from most other letters (except A) unless the typesetter intentionally mis-spaces it.

Look at the distance between the top of the G and the E, the top of the E and the N and so forth. Now look at the distance between the top of the E and the top of the V. All spaces are the same (as they should be) including the distance between the V and the A
I wouldn't go so far as to call it an optical illusion. It's really the case that the bulk of the V is too far from the E. The typesetter "intentionally mis-spacing it" is called kerning, and is what all good engravers (i.e. not those at the mall engraving kiosk) would do.

Now I'm not saying this one is fake, as the variation seen there is within the realm of acceptable (i.e. it's debatable whether this example is poorly kerned or not)
 
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I wouldn't go so far as to call it an optical illusion. It's really the case that the bulk of the V is too far from the E. The typesetter "intentionally mis-spacing it" is called kerning, and is what all good engravers (i.e. not those at the mall engraving kiosk) would do.

Now I'm not saying this one is fake, as the variation seen there is within the realm of acceptable (i.e. it's debatable whether this example is poorly kerned or not)
Yes and no. Kerning is an adjustment of the spacing but it cannot be applied to all letters. Here, kerning (and I intentionally used the word mis-spacing as few are familiar with "kerning") would create an awkward looking word as the letters E and V do not lend themselves to kerning - like V and A or L and V.

We're both saying the same thing - you really can't scoot those two letters closer together and it is fine.
 
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