WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,455 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First of all, Merry Christmas to everyone! And for those of us who do celebrate today, I'd like ot wish you a happy holiday as well. :)

Last night, after far too many vodka-laced eggnogs and champagne, I suffered my first watch injury. :-( Long story short, I have a fairly deep scratch on my Seiko BFK's crystal, and I'm looking for some advice on how to go about replacing it.

What would be my best option in terms of who services the watch, and how much should I expect to spend on something like this?

Although I am not a diver in any sense of the word, I do get my watches wet frequently so it's important to me that I find someone to do this right.

Thanks for your input, and again, I wish you all a happy holiday! :-!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,020 Posts
...scratch on my Seiko BFK's crystal, and I'm looking for some advice on how to go about replacing it. :-!
That notwithstanding, my advice to you would be not to touch it, crystals are made to be scratched and trustworthy, skillful technicians are not easy to find. The watch is just cosmetically compromised and is best left alone until such time that it needs real service. Instead, you could post some shots so that we all can marvel at your latest masterpiece.;-)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,757 Posts
That notwithstanding, my advice to you would be not to touch it, crystals are made to be scratched and trustworthy, skillful technicians are not easy to find. The watch is just cosmetically compromised and is best left alone until such time that it needs real service. Instead, you could post some shots so that we all can marvel at your latest masterpiece.;-)
Great advice. And, if I may also add, if the crystal is not replaced the way Seiko inserts/seals it in the factory, worse damage may occur; what with air/water/humidity.

You may want to consider how to reduce the look of the scratch. There are special liquids (if the scratch isn't deep) that reduce the appearance of the scratch. Also, there's the old method of using any toothpaste that has baking soda in it. NOT the newer brands that have mica. Just a minute dab, and brush in the direction of the scratch with a soft-bristled toothbrush. This may reduce the appearance. Then, when that's over, I suggest you try an electric shoe buffer, with soft cotten pads. This is what I use to give my watch crystals and high polish bands a beautiful luster.

Angelis
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,921 Posts
Great advice. And, if I may also add, if the crystal is not replaced the way Seiko inserts/seals it in the factory, worse damage may occur; what with air/water/humidity.

You may want to consider how to reduce the look of the scratch. There are special liquids (if the scratch isn't deep) that reduce the appearance of the scratch. Also, there's the old method of using any toothpaste that has baking soda in it. NOT the newer brands that have mica. Just a minute dab, and brush in the direction of the scratch with a soft-bristled toothbrush. This may reduce the appearance. Then, when that's over, I suggest you try an electric shoe buffer, with soft cotten pads. This is what I use to give my watch crystals and high polish bands a beautiful luster.

Angelis
I have an old Casio that once had a nasty gouge across the crystal. A previous owner, put clear finger nail polish on it and you can barely see the old scratch with a 10x loupe; not at all with the naked eye.
I wouldn't try this on acrylic though; not sure what might happen chemically :-s
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,455 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the input guys. The scratch is just deep enough so that I can feel it with my fingernail when lightly running across the crystal, but visually it's not very noticeable.

It seems like the right thing to do is to just let it go for the time being. :)

If I were, in fact, to send it to Seiko for a replacement do you have any idea as to what I might be looking at in terms of cost?

Thanks again guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
Flitz metal polish has worked well for me regarding minor scratches. After an application or two, you REALLY have to squint/discriminate/other nitpicking mode in order to observe any scratch. Yes, that's right, I said "metal polish." Works wonders on my sapphire and other crytal mediums. I'm not guaranteeing anything here, but, I've found that the polish works wonders. Use the tube version. I bought mine at a chef specialty store. I've also seen Flitz sold at hardware stores. Just follow the instructions.

Oh, and, I follow up with one of those jewellers' yellow/rouge cloths connected together. Those work well too.

Fret not . . . I mean, what's the worse thing that can happen out of this? End up buying a new watch :-d ?
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top