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Chronograph Subdial LAYOUT

  • 3 -- 6 -- 9 (Valjoux 7753 standard)

    Votes: 65 61.9%
  • 6 -- 9 -- 12 (Valjoux 7750 standard)

    Votes: 25 23.8%
  • 12 -- 3 -- 9

    Votes: 1 1.0%
  • 12 -- 3 -- 6

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 3 -- 9

    Votes: 25 23.8%
  • 12 -- 6

    Votes: 1 1.0%
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Also, what's making you say the 7753 is discontinued?

I'm still seeing info on the website...


That said, I think all of ETA's 4-digit calibres are no longer sold outside Swatch Group, if at all anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Also, what's making you say the 7753 is discontinued?

I'm still seeing info on the website...


That said, I think all of ETA's 4-digit calibres are no longer sold outside Swatch Group, if at all anymore.
It was just an assumption on my part, as 99.99% of the watches that have any mention of the 7753 have been all from the 70's, and before.
I also did not know that 7753 now goes by some other name / number.

In any case, selection of automatic chronographs with subdials at 3 - 9, or 3 - 6 - 9 seem to be FAR smaller than those with 6 - 9 - 12
 

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In any case, selection of automatic chronographs with subdials at 3 - 9, or 3 - 6 - 9 seem to be FAR smaller than those with 6 - 9 - 12
Where are you looking? 3-9 layouts are quite popular now. Hamilton, Hemel, Farer, Chris Ward, Straton, Hanhart, B&R, Longines, TAG, and Seiko all have 3-9 auto chronos. Several also have 3-6-9 layout offerings.
 

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Gonna say it: I really like the dial layouts on some of the Timex Waterbury chronos. Clean, legible, pretty much hits all my criteria.

I’ve never liked the Timex “tick” though. I do have a Timex I love, but the movement in it is Seiko solar quartz.
 

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9 - 6 (some Hamiltons) and just 6 is missing from this voting list, I have a Seiko "6" and I've considered Hamilton 9-6 models. I like all the configurations, I own 5 of them. I think the 3 - 9 "Type 20" layout is probably my favorite. The 12-3-6 & 12-3-9 is the rarest as it's mountingthe movements essentially upside down. I've seen these but never purchased.
 
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Especially if they’re going to insist on a date complication. This layout allows the date at 3, instead of the screwy 4:30 position.
Yeah I was thinking exactly that a date at 3.
I know I personally cannot stand the 4:30 position for myself!
 
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It was just an assumption on my part, as 99.99% of the watches that have any mention of the 7753 have been all from the 70's, and before.
I also did not know that 7753 now goes by some other name / number.

In any case, selection of automatic chronographs with subdials at 3 - 9, or 3 - 6 - 9 seem to be FAR smaller than those with 6 - 9 - 12
The 7753 was only developed in the last 15 years or so, and the 7750 it's based on is from 1974. The previous 7733 is from the '60s, though.
 

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I have a Mido Chronograph Caliber 60, which uses an ETA A05H3 (7753). I believe the main differences are an SI springs for longer power reserve. The Mido uses a separate screw down pusher for the date adjust. Between the 5 crowns/pushers and the 44mm case, the thing is a beast, but it looks good with the 3-9 bicompax layout.

On the other hand, I think the Timewalker looks PERFECT with the 6-9-12 layout. It just works for that design, where the 3-6-9 version does not work quite as well.

Changing the date near midnight on the 7750 can cause damage. Does anyone know if this is also the case with the 7753 if it has a separate pusher for the date?
 

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Really? Please explain
It is a matter of geometry and the seconds subdial's critical 6 - 12 axis. When at the 6 position, the minute hand will be parallel to that axis occasionally, but regularly, blocking the second hand from view. With the subdial at 9, the hands can never be parallel to the 6 -12. Of course, some of the subdial will be covered with the minute hand, and you will "lose" the second hand when the minute hand covers the 3 - 9 axis, but that is not as important given that most people want to know the exact minute vice, 15 seconds prior to the minute.

All of this may be a reason why two versions of the famous Unitas handwound movement were created -- 6497 & 6498.

Good question, heb
 

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It is a matter of geometry and the seconds subdial's critical 6 - 12 axis. When at the 6 position, the minute hand will be parallel to that axis occasionally, but regularly, blocking the second hand from view. With the subdial at 9, the hands can never be parallel to the 6 -12. Of course, some of the subdial will be covered with the minute hand, and you will "lose" the second hand when the minute hand covers the 3 - 9 axis, but that is not as important given that most people want to know the exact minute vice, 15 seconds prior to the minute.

All of this may be a reason why two versions of the famous Unitas handwound movement were created -- 6497 & 6498.

Good question, heb
Thank you.
Never thought of it like that 👍
 

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It is a matter of geometry and the seconds subdial's critical 6 - 12 axis. When at the 6 position, the minute hand will be parallel to that axis occasionally, but regularly, blocking the second hand from view. With the subdial at 9, the hands can never be parallel to the 6 -12. Of course, some of the subdial will be covered with the minute hand, and you will "lose" the second hand when the minute hand covers the 3 - 9 axis, but that is not as important given that most people want to know the exact minute vice, 15 seconds prior to the minute.

All of this may be a reason why two versions of the famous Unitas handwound movement were created -- 6497 & 6498.

Good question, heb
That does assume that when the minute hand broaches the top of the running seconds subdial at 9 that it's thin enough always to allow a clear view of the second had as it reaches the top of the dial, and the chronograph is for some reason not being used for fine timing.

FWIW both 3-6-9 and 6-9-12 variants of the ETA/Valjoux 775x family (now ETA A05 family) have running seconds subdials at 9.
 

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That does assume that when the minute hand broaches the top of the running seconds subdial at 9 that it's thin enough always to allow a clear view of the second had as it reaches the top of the dial, and the chronograph is for some reason not being used for fine timing.

FWIW both 3-6-9 and 6-9-12 variants of the ETA/Valjoux 775x family (now ETA A05 family) have running seconds subdials at 9.
Thin hands are an absolute must for chrono legibility. I’ve seen some that at first glance are nice looking watches, but then notice the fat hands that will do a lot of subdial blocking.
 
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