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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a new Citizen Eco-Drive watch, a basic dive watch. So far, it seems to be reasonably accurate, perhaps a second or two a day, BUT yesterday I happened to take it off and store it in my desk drawer overnight and I noticed that it lost almost TEN SECONDS overnight. Stored elsewhere, it seems to be right on time again today. The only possible explanation I can think of is that in the drawer it was in reasonably close proximity to my computer tower (and right under a landline caller ID phone), and possibly a foot or so from my LCD monitor, but it's hard to believe any of these create a strong enough magnetic field that they would interfere with the watch. But if it isn't one (or more) of those, I am stumped. Thoughts would be welcome and thank you in advance.
 

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The first thing that comes to my mind is that the source against which you checked your watch was not correct. It has happened before, several websites give out a time which is not totally reliable. Having said that the next possibility is that the battery of your watch is not sufficiently charged but this should not cause the mov't to lose seconds per day.

In any case Iwould suggest that you check again your source and that you also let your watch have a lot of sunlight. IMO no home interference can cause what you have experienced.
 

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1-2 seconds a day and lost 10 seconds over night for quartz is VERY bad. There has to be something badly wrong with it. My Citizen Titanium (also Eco-Drive) has a 5 sec/2 months accuracy. That's what, around 2.5 seconds a month... incredible accuracy considering its rated as 15sec/month watch...
 

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The first thing that comes to my mind is that the source against which you checked your watch was not correct.
Yup, that'd be my first choice for an explanation. Followed closely by human error. (Hey, first thing in the morning, still half asleep, maybe eyes not at their sharpest, quite possibly brain not at its sharpest, and so you either read the watch incorrectly, or interpreted what you saw incorrectly.)

Third possibility - the watch, left to itself, actually does lose maybe 20 seconds per day (which would be ridiculously poor accuracy for a quartz watch), but you never noticed it before because the watch would sync up with the atomic clock time signal and adjust itself to the correct time a few times per day. And while it was in the drawer, it couldn't get the radio signal, so it didn't automatically correct itself. (This assumes the watch isn't just Eco-Drive, but also has the "sync with atomic clock via radio signal" feature.) This would explain why, stored in another place, it's right back on the correct time today. Clearly, in this other place, it can receive the atomic clock signal.

Whichever is the correct explanation, if you catch the watch keeping poor time again, smack it. I find smacking a misbehaving electronic device to be an effective means of teaching the device to start behaving properly. Moreover, from a purely psychological perspective, I find it to be therapeutic. Admittedly, I seldom smack electronic devices much smaller than a cell phone, but I have no reason to think that a Citizen Eco-Drive wristwatch is too small to be smacked.
 

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Those magnetic fields will not be strong enough to freeze the seconds hand.

I would keep an eye on it, referencing time.is or time.gov every day. If your quartz watch is losing 1.5 seconds a day (or gaining) that alone means it's troubled and ready for warranty service/replacement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
For what it's worth, time.gov is the source I use, and I am SURE I read the watch correctly when I took it out of the drawer. And it is new, I just purchased it. It seems bizarre but there must be some reason it is not keeping accurate time while in the drawer, as there isn't any other variable.
 

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For what it's worth, time.gov is the source I use, and I am SURE I read the watch correctly when I took it out of the drawer. And it is new, I just purchased it. It seems bizarre but there must be some reason it is not keeping accurate time while in the drawer, as there isn't any other variable.
It may well have stayed for 6 months in the seller's safe and be nearly discharged. First thing I would charge it throughly assuming the cell is nearly depleted (refer to the charging table on the manual) then keep it under observation to see if this thing happens again.
 

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For what it's worth, time.gov is the source I use, and I am SURE I read the watch correctly when I took it out of the drawer. And it is new, I just purchased it. It seems bizarre but there must be some reason it is not keeping accurate time while in the drawer, as there isn't any other variable.
Just to eliminate it as a talking point, is the watch radio controlled? I second the suggestion to charge it up. Give 'er a sunbath for a few days -- direct sunlight, and then repeat the test. I'm also wondering if this watch has a sort of "sleep mode" when it sits in darkness for a certain amount of time? Maybe when that feature kicks in, it somehow interrupts accuracy for some reason (although it shouldn't). If you REALLY wanted to go crazy testing this out, you could store it in that drawer a few more times and if it is consistently displaying inaccuracies, go buy a cheapie 5 dollar quartz something or other and store it in the same drawer. See if the cheap one is affected too. If so, then you know its the drawer and there's some kind of interference. Your only choice then will be to build a faraday cage specifically for that drawer to store your watch in. Major bummer, but you gotta do what you gotta do...
 

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Charge it up and be sure to check it against the same reliable source like time.gov. Not your cell phone, gps, computer clock, nightstand clock, etc. Give it a day to charge and let us know how the watch performed.
 

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Charge it up and be sure to check it against the same reliable source like time.gov. Not your cell phone, gps, computer clock, nightstand clock, etc. Give it a day to charge and let us know how the watch performed.
Computer clock is OK if computer runs NTP software; GPS is also OK, if it can receive GPS signal :)
 

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I never thought about it losing it's charge - this, to me, is a prime example of the value of this forum.
Charge it up for a few days as suggested.
Check & set the time using a known accurate source.
Put it in a drawer where there is no chance of any interference.
Check time 24 Hours later using the same accurate source.
Any variance outside the spec of the watch and it must be due to a faulty watch.
 

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I happened identical situation with a model Citizen CA0125-07E. My watch was late 10min to 24h! :-( I think the reason microwave oven, but I'm not sure ... :think:
 

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For what it's worth, time.gov is the source I use, and I am SURE I read the watch correctly when I took it out of the drawer. And it is new, I just purchased it. It seems bizarre but there must be some reason it is not keeping accurate time while in the drawer, as there isn't any other variable.
It can only be two things. The movement is not accurate out-of-the-box. Which is sad. Or the cell is not picking charge. My Citizen NaviHawk stays for months in a drawer, and re-syncs back to accurate time as soon as I pull it out. Though it has a power save of 5 years, so probably the module keeps the internal time, and the hands stop. They re-align (fast spinning) when it powers back up, as soon as it sees "light". Charge it full in the sun for some hours, and report back.
 
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