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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have a parnis quartz chronograph - not expensive but looked ok (first pic).

the domed crystal (described as mineral glass) shattered very easily (slight knock off a door handle).

I've taken out the miyota OS11 movement.

the problem as I see it is that the crystal is shattered (see pic) - is it likely to come out at all with a press or will bits get stuck and if so can they be removed?

also the chronograph pushers would impede the insertion of a press - how can these pushers be removed?

or is it a lost cause? thanks.

parnis 46mm full chronograph.jpg

parniss shtattered.jpeg
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
there does not appear to be any c-clip on the pusher and also there is no thread on it for a screwdriver so I have no idea how they are to be removed (pulled with a pliers from the inside or outside the case?)
 

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There should be no need for a press to remove what remains of the crystal. If there is no gasket, then it is likely that the crystal is cemented with epoxy or an ultraviolet light activated adhesive. If that is true, put the case in boiling water; this will break the adhesive bond. Then just push the glass from the back side with a piece of pegwood. The glass will come out in pieces, but it's already broken. I'd probably pull it out with my fingers, but in the interest of not injuring one's fingers, it would be prudent to use a pusher of some sort. A gloved hand will allow you to hold the hot case.

James Sadilek -- ccwatchmaker
 

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I considered the possibility of damage to the pusher gaskets as I suggested the immersion in boiling water. These gaskets are almost surely made of a material that is described as Buna-N. It is used in automotive and aircraft engine applications where temperatures easily exceed that of boiling water. This from the web: "This compound should give good service from -40° to +250° F." I believe you are safe using boiling water, but this is your watch and therefore your decision.

Heating is the accepted method of loosening most adhesive bonds. The appeal to using boiling water is that the temperature is tightly controlled. Boiling water will never go over 212F in an open container. The other method of breaking the epoxy bond is by soaking the article in acetone. This will definitely dissolve the gaskets.

In my experience, if you don't use the boiling water method, you will be chipping out the glass and epoxy bit by bit.

Regarding the pushers, they are pressed into the case. Special tools are available to remove them.

James Sadilek -- ccwatchmaker
 

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I considered the possibility of damage to the pusher gaskets as I suggested the immersion in boiling water. These gaskets are almost surely made of a material that is described as Buna-N. It is used in automotive and aircraft engine applications where temperatures easily exceed that of boiling water. This from the web: "This compound should give good service from -40° to +250° F." I believe you are safe using boiling water, but this is your watch and therefore your decision.

Heating is the accepted method of loosening most adhesive bonds. The appeal to using boiling water is that the temperature is tightly controlled. Boiling water will never go over 212F in an open container. The other method of breaking the epoxy bond is by soaking the article in acetone. This will definitely dissolve the gaskets.

In my experience, if you don't use the boiling water method, you will be chipping out the glass and epoxy bit by bit.

Regarding the pushers, they are pressed into the case. Special tools are available to remove them.

James Sadilek -- ccwatchmaker
I'd take boiling water over acetone any day. Much less hazardous.
 

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From the small photo, this may be the type where you need to pry off the bezel in front of the watch. Since this is a "Parnis," there's no way to know for sure how this is put together.

This Seiko case servicing guide shows a number of ways a crystal could be installed and has specific procedures on how to remove broken crystals. You may find it helpful:

https://www.seikoserviceusa.com/uploads/datasheets/Servicing_Guide.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the responses.

Was able to hand-push the reminder in the end. Seems to have been only pressed in.

So I won't have to deal with the pushers thankfully.

Now I have to track down the dimensions of the crystal to source a new one.

I've emailed some sellers in the hype that one may have this info.

It is actually a nice looking watch fur what it is but I will try to get a better quality replacement lens than what was on it as it really broke too easily. It was a fairly benign clip off a door handle.

Sapphire is not scratch resistant. Is it also hardier?
 

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There are folks on eBay that sell crystals in almost any dimension imagineable. I once replaced an Orient Defender's mineral crystal with a sapphire one (can't believe Orient never made that watch with a sapphire) and after measuring (and re-measuring) the case dimensions, was able to find a crystal that fit pretty snug and then installed it with UV epoxy. Far easier than trying to SWAG a crystal + gasket combo although with the method I used, water/moisture was always a real threat in almost any amount.
 

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Glasso...Hello.

I am a Great Fan of plastic crystals. Over the years, I've encountered ( in my hobby ) many watches with scratched-up / nicked / damaged glass or sapphire crystals. With rare exceptions, I do not attempt to secure a Manufacturer's Official Replacement...I simply measure the case, and go over to my selection of Generic, plastic items, and either pop one in, or reach for my 100% Irreplaceable, "L&R Precision Cement", and run a bead around the case, and set the bright, clear new crystal in place.

That's it. The procedure's quick & inexpensive & results in a very good looking job, that incorporates a crystal that's resistant to damage, yet very easy to renew, should scratches appear.

Sapphire crystals certainly look good, and are quite resistant to scratches...but not impacts!

Mineral glass items are a bit more resilient, but cannot be renewed under most circumstances.

For me--whether it's a 1960's Timex or a Jules Jurgensen Chronograph--I really do like good, old-fashioned plastic crystals.

Michael.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yes I thought of measuring with a calipers but I'm not sure if I'd do it correctly.

If I get the information from the manufacturer then at least I would have a more accurate idea.

I plan to source a crystal myself and try to put it in with a press that I'll buy.

I'm aware that the eBay presses are not well regarded but they will have to do as I can't justify a proper one for an occasional job.


The watch is not rated waterproof so I'm not worried about that allergy.
 

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Glasso...Hello.

I am a Great Fan of plastic crystals. Over the years, I've encountered ( in my hobby ) many watches with scratched-up / nicked / damaged glass or sapphire crystals. With rare exceptions, I do not attempt to secure a Manufacturer's Official Replacement...I simply measure the case, and go over to my selection of Generic, plastic items, and either pop one in, or reach for my 100% Irreplaceable, "L&R Precision Cement", and run a bead around the case, and set the bright, clear new crystal in place.

That's it. The procedure's quick & inexpensive & results in a very good looking job, that incorporates a crystal that's resistant to damage, yet very easy to renew, should scratches appear.

Sapphire crystals certainly look good, and are quite resistant to scratches...but not impacts!

Mineral glass items are a bit more resilient, but cannot be renewed under most circumstances.

For me--whether it's a 1960's Timex or a Jules Jurgensen Chronograph--I really do like good, old-fashioned plastic crystals.

Michael.
I hope you get approval from your customers before doing this. It's not a plan that I suspect many of mine would accept...
 

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There are folks on eBay that sell crystals in almost any dimension imagineable. I once replaced an Orient Defender's mineral crystal with a sapphire one (can't believe Orient never made that watch with a sapphire) and after measuring (and re-measuring) the case dimensions, was able to find a crystal that fit pretty snug and then installed it with UV epoxy. Far easier than trying to SWAG a crystal + gasket combo although with the method I used, water/moisture was always a real threat in almost any amount.

Orient now has several models with sapphire crystals. The Kamasu, the Sun and Moon, v4, the Speedtech Auto come mind.

I have a couple of Orients which did NOT come with sapphire and have replaced both with new sapphire crystals. The first Mako XL got its soft mineral crystal gouged while rock climbing in Moab, Utah. Just barely brushed against the red rock and scraped some frosty white lines over the 3 index /date window. ...grrr. But then sandstone is just grains of nice hard quartz waiting to scratch up watches of the unwary careless. But I digress.

The eBay route works for both crystal and "cheap" press sourcing. That said - ALWAYS buy the best tools one can afford and definitely purchase quality screwdrivers...which means nothing from C***a.


This repair, now that the shattered crystal is out, should be straightforward...AND ....rewarding. I know my first crystal swap was a bit daunting to imagine Me ( a clumsy oaf ) doing something like this ...until...I did it.

Success on the first attempt!! I was stoked. I may never dive into swapping hairsprings or complete movement service but I now have a bunch more confidence in myself with minor mods on my modest collection.

If I did it...anyone can...within reason. Good luck, Glasso!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks all and nice job SteveO

I cleared the glass and managed to find an ebay listing for a crystal referencing the same watch as a secondary item picture.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Replacement-Domed-Mineral-Crystal-For-Parnis-Pilots-Watch/122766325172

now the seller doesn't directly give the specs but there is an MPN number listed as 37.DFL.15 and that pretty obviously decodes as 37mm width , 15mm thickness and it's described as single domed, flat bottom. I guess that double-domed would work also? and double-domed is supposed to be stronger?

do you think the vinyl housing will be ok to reuse. doesn't seem to have any glue / cement used or am I wrong - see pic.

would one of the ebay watch pressers do an adequate job? (not the best option I know but this may be a one-off job)

parnis cleared.jpeg
 

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It's better to confirm the actual dimensions by measuring instead of guessing or hoping. I would be somewhat hesitant to buy from a seller who's not able to give actual dimensions.

Flat, single dome, or double domed are all ok. For single dome, there may be slight distortion when viewing from an angle. I think the real reason the crystal broke was because it was "cheap" (poor quality...not real mineral glass). Quality may be more reliable if you buy from a real watch parts supplier like Esslingers or CousinsUK (among others).

Keep in mind it must be exact fit; when a 37.0mm crystal is needed, a 37.1mm won't fit and 36.9mm would be too loose.

Check this: https://blog.esslinger.com/how-to-p...rystal-into-place-with-a-watch-crystal-press/

If the original plastic ring visually looks ok, then it fine to reuse. The cheap $10-20 press is ok for thin crystals like 1.0mm or slightly thicker. Anything more than that, you may need something more robust.

Hint: search for other posts on WUS with people reporting problems installing watch crystal. It's sometimes not straight forward as seen on YouTube.
 

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There are many sources that size their crystals in mm. Stay away from the souks and go to a professional supplier (esslinger, ofrei, Cas-Ker, cousinsUK) BTW, your 15mm thick crystal would look out-of-place on a Kav, you are really looking at 1.50mm.

The white ring in your case is a hytrel gasket. Yours looks like it is an "L" gasket with a small lip on the bottom (as best I can tell from the picture, "I" is the other choice). These are somewhat more scarce than "I", but still available in many sizes. Regarding size, you need to be able to measure inside diameters and depths accurately, within 0.01mm; a good pair of vernier, dial or electronic calipers will suffice. Measure the existing inside diameter of the gasket where the crystal sits (not the lip below). It should be very close but smaller than the OD of the crystal (by maybe 0.01 or 0.02mm); it will relax slightly when the crystal is removed.

If you want water resistance, you probably won't get it with the existing gasket. First, they are one-use and second, your's likely is full of tiny slivers of glass. The gasket slides out towards the top and then measure it's height and thickness. Also measure the OD of the bore it sits in. The bore should be a little smaller than your new gasket on your new crystal, say 0.04 to 0.10mm. This is the crush that makes for a waterproof seal. It's also the crush that makes a cheap ebay press fail.

BTW, I just got a "Case Press" at Harbor Freight for $14; it looks identical to the ones on ebay. I haven't tried it on a crystal yet, but I bought it as a cheap set of dies, I have a serious press.

Oh, and if you like AR, Cousins sells their flat sapphire crystals with AR on one side for about $2 more.
 
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