WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Seeing several ebay auctions for watches that are being called "perpetual calendars" from some big names as Piaget & Blancpain.
They look a couple decades older, 80's-90's, and have the "full calendar" sub dials displays on the dial -Month, Day, Date, maybe a moon phase as well.

There is even a Christie's auction listing a Piaget Perpetual calendar, Ref. 15958 (Google it) that does a nice write-up on the type I'm referring to.
They too call it a perpetual calendar.

MY CONFUSION: None of these mentioned above have a leap year indicator, and I thought a perp calendar would need to show one? Otherwise, how do you know what year the watch is set to and what leap year cycle year you are in to know if it's set correctly? How do you set it?

I thought the watches that have all these date sub dials are either: Full calendars, triple calendars, possibly annual calendars --but NOT perpetual calendars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,351 Posts
They’re not – they are annual calendars (at best) listed by idiots or using search manipulation to get theirs to show up when filtering out the stuff you purposefully don’t want included.
The Piaget ones I can’t even see buttons to push, and if all the calendar functions are done purely through the crown, there must be an extra position to set them, since a bi-directional position 1 would affect only two of the three.
If I had to guess, I’d say those aren’t even ACs, and you’ll be manually changing the date/month every time there’s less than 31 days in the month.
Even the Blancpain GMT one has AC mentioned in its description, and eBay’s filtering somehow managed to convince itself that a Patek 5196 was a PC!
As always, scrutinise everything thoroughly, and use Google’s image search to see better photos and compare to what’s on offer – then you can be sure about what exactly is listed and which complications it does or doesn’t have.
And listers have a habit (more so on C24) of re-using previous listings as a template, because they’re lazy sods and can’t be bothered to proofread before hitting the submit button.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thank you! I thought I was going crazy or missing something very basis. You're right on about the Piaget listed with Christie's...no manual pushers anywhere to adjust individual dials. BUT on Christie's???
Shame.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36,279 Posts
Gavox Aurora

UTC/GMT
All possible timezones worldwide (96)
Perpetual calendar including leapyears
Day/Date and Month
Countdown timer to 32 hours
Stopwatch chronometer to 32 hours
Moonphase
Power save mode
Unique Soprod Mecatronic quartz movement
4-7 year battery life

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,916 Posts
Gavox Aurora

UTC/GMT
All possible timezones worldwide (96)
Perpetual calendar including leapyears
Day/Date and Month
Countdown timer to 32 hours
Stopwatch chronometer to 32 hours
Moonphase
Power save mode
Unique Soprod Mecatronic quartz movement
4-7 year battery life
Confused F71 w F381....

(quartz perpetual calendar is relatively easy and cheap to produce, and is as relevant to this discussion as iPhone calendar)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
926 Posts
Perhaps they're using perpetual the same way Rolex uses "perpetual", in other words, automatic self-winding.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,121 Posts
Perhaps they're using perpetual the same way Rolex uses "perpetual", in other words, automatic self-winding.
Most likely not. I'll buy "clueless gits" much more readily.

You would hope a perp cal movement would incorporate a year-cycle subdial for setting purposes...on the back is fine, even sensible. (It's not needed very often.) Not sure this is always the case, tho.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
405 Posts
Confused F71 w F381....

(quartz perpetual calendar is relatively easy and cheap to produce, and is as relevant to this discussion as iPhone calendar)
You are right the microchip in the Gavox Aurora has the knowledge of perpetual calendar however the novelty is the way I can show the day, date, month, year with this watch and only 3 hands


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,336 Posts
Just as a quick summary:

"Calendar" means a date display.

"Full calendar" means day, month, and date displays. A moonphase is often also included.

"Annual Calendar" means that the movement compensates for 30 and 31-day months. Its date must be reset at the end of every February. Some companies have created a countwheel that also handles the normal 28-day February, so that it only has to be corrected every leap year.

"Perpetual" means that the movement compensates for February and leap year, too.

You can tell modern full perpetual-calendar watches because they either show a four-year month display (to account for leap year), the year, or the offset into the leap-year cycle. There are vintage perpetual-calendar watches that don't tell you where you are in the leap-year cycle, but I'm glad I never have to set one.

Rick "who came close to owning an Ebel BTR Chronograph Perpetual Calendar but didn't pull the trigger" Denney
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,340 Posts
You can tell modern full perpetual-calendar watches because they either show a four-year month display (to account for leap year), the year, or the offset into the leap-year cycle.
Although some are trickier and have the leap year display on the back. Or, in the case of the JLC, just has a tiny window that shows the actual year on the front.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,460 Posts
"Annual Calendar" means that the movement compensates for 30 and 31-day months. Its date must be reset at the end of every February. Some companies have created a countwheel that also handles the normal 28-day February, so that it only has to be corrected every leap year.

"Perpetual" means that the movement compensates for February and leap year, too.
While I agree that's how it should be, I could swear I've seen calendars that only have to be set once every 4 years "officially" referred to as perpetual. (By "officially" I mean a brand website or online site like Hodinee, Monochrome, etc.)

I feel like maybe we need to use another name for a "set date every 4 years" movement. I like "quadrennial" - I've seen it used that way occasionally.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,336 Posts
While I agree that's how it should be, I could swear I've seen calendars that only have to be set once every 4 years "officially" referred to as perpetual. (By "officially" I mean a brand website or online site like Hodinee, Monochrome, etc.)

I feel like maybe we need to use another name for a "set date every 4 years" movement. I like "quadrennial" - I've seen it used that way occasionally.
For a while, I thought that's what "quantiemme perpetuel" meant, but I suppose it means that the calendar follows a four-year cycle, and thus accounts for leap year.

But there are watches that handle February as a 28-day month that are still called "annual calendars". Not that I can remember which ones, offhand.

It seems the nomenclature is built around the period it covers more that how often it must be set.

Rick "who does not consider the blogs any more authoritative than I am, except for industry gossip and product offerings" Denney
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top