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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm hoping other members can share their experiences with NOS acquisitions that are in the range of approximately 15-20 years old. I understand that a sizeable number of movements have been in production, and welcome any feedback whether general or specific, however I will narrow my inquiry down to 3133 and 2609.NP/NA and their close variants to simplify matters.

I've been mostly sticking to newly produced watches for obvious reasons relating to service and warranty. However I've been considering a few "NOS" watches and I'm interested to learn more about what I can expect from a 15-20 year old movement provided it is in fact new old stock.

Is there anything that should be taken into consideration? For example, is it reasonable to expect normal operation without having to immediately service or regulate the watch? Any comments on operational life expectancy and/or when servicing might typically come into play?

Thanks... :-!
 

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I'm advised by a watchmaker that even though a Russian watch is NOS, if its in that age bracket, the lubricants will have long ago dried up, and lost their friction reducing capability, and the watch should be serviced, regardless of its pristine appearance.
 

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I'm advised by a watchmaker that even though a Russian watch is NOS, if its in that age bracket, the lubricants will have long ago dried up, and lost their friction reducing capability, and the watch should be serviced, regardless of its pristine appearance.
True.... it's too bad though, because many watchmakers won't even touch a Russian watch and the servicing cost can be easily more than the price of the watch itself. :-(
 

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Very true. But I take the view that keeping the watch running is as important as buying it, so factor in servicing costs.
 

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I have a few NOS/vintage russian watches not serviced, so they are not running except on rare occasions... chances are that they won't give me problems but in the event parts are needed they are relatively common and finding a donor isn't hard.

I wear often the newer ones and service them as needed.
 

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When a watchmaker oils a watch, but does not clean or service it, what kind of oil is used, and which parts are oiled?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I'm advised by a watchmaker that even though a Russian watch is NOS, if its in that age bracket, the lubricants will have long ago dried up, and lost their friction reducing capability, and the watch should be serviced, regardless of its pristine appearance.
Makes proper sense...

True.... it's too bad though, because many watchmakers won't even touch a Russian watch and the servicing cost can be easily more than the price of the watch itself. :-(
I think I need to find a watchmaker and get some estimates first. At this point it's looking like international shipping. One of the many benefits with buying new is having relatively easy access to service. Another future option I suppose is getting some gear and do-it-yourself knowledge although I'm afraid even many of the basics are highly skilled and potentially costly tasks.

Very true. But I take the view that keeping the watch running is as important as buying it, so factor in servicing costs.
Indeed... it's only right. One of the NOS watches I'm looking at is $150 without a strap. Add a decent strap, service + international shipping, and I'm probably back in a comparable new watch bracket. Unless the price is right I guess it really has to be a special NOS watch... :think:

Thanks for your replies |>.
 
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