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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I know we are talking about a low-cost department store watch here (mine happens to be a no-frills quartz).

The history is that even though this watch is the least interesting in my collection and has substantially no real value, it does hold sentimental value to me in that it was my wedding gift given to me by my wife.

Over the past year I've taken up an interest in repairing / rebuilding my own wrist watches, and now that the battery is dead in my Colibri, I figured I'd just replace the battery myself since I generally have all of the tools to do so. How much different could a pocket watch really be, I thought....

Here's where I was thrown for a loop - I removed the crystal (it's part of a bezel that just prys off), and I had expected the watch movement/dial/hands to generally fall out of the case from the side opposite the crown leaving the stem and crown attached to the case based on what I'd read about pocket watch disassembly elsewhere. Apparently my watch does not work this way as the stem seems to stay retained to the movement with the admittedly light pressure I am apply to the movement/dial once I angle the 6 o'clock side out of the case.

Any suggestions as to where a stem release might be? This watch is about 15 years old, and I would assume to have a pretty generic japanese quartz movement in it (no "Swiss Made" markings anywhere on it to indicate otherwise, but because the movement is still in the case I can't really identify any model numbers either...). A picture is attached - rather fuzzy, but you get the idea of what the general watch looks like (hunting case, etc.).

Any help would be appreciated. It can't be this hard to change a battery. :)

Thanks,

Scott
 

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"Modern" pocket watches are more like wristwatches in that the access to the movement is from the back and there will be a stem release there.

However, to replace the battery, you usually don't have to remove the movement. Removing the back cover should expose the battery compartment.


I think most pocket watch manufacturers stop using the style of pocket watch stem that stays mounted in the case about 1950 (maybe earlier).
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There doesn't seem to be any visible line in the case back (or notch for a case knife, for that matter).

What appears to work is to remove the hands and dial -- I can then lift the movement just enough to get at the battery holder. This almost can't be right though. I'm assuming there is a stem release somewhere more accessible that I am just not finding...

Scott
 

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Ok here's the scoop. I've got one of those on my bench here. What you've done is popped the crystal out (oops) I would suggest getting Crystal remover (claw like tool) and popping that back in. You'll need a snap case opener and pry the back off right at the crown position. If you look closely with a loupe you'll see small tiny cut out where you're suppose to start prying. The battery slot will have a metal tab held down by a screw. you should be able to just shimmy that metal tab out of the way and pop the battery out. Oh and if this helps you out please do me a favour and tell me what battery number it took as I've got the same pocket watch here i'm going to do a quick restore on and cannot for the life of me figure out which battery is suppose to go in there. thanks a bunch and if you really need to you can talk to me about mailing it over to me and i have the claw tool. I can pop that back in for free and ship it back. I don't mind doing little thing for fellow WUS'rs
Wes - AL
 

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Pay attention to which side is up while the battery is in the watch because some movement's require the battery to go in "upside down" (ie opposite to the norm)

Measure the diameter and thickness of the battery and check it against the button cell battery size listings here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_battery_sizes

All the button cells of a certain size are the same voltage. Various button cells are available for some sizes but it comes down to battery longevity (mAh) which shouldn't be a problem for a quartz watch with no digital display and no lighting system.

Next .. hit a few dollar stores. I've found a selection of "almost" all sizes at a couple of local stores in packages of 5 for $1 listed by the "AG" sizing names
 

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All the button cells of a certain size are the same voltage. Various button cells are available for some sizes but it comes down to battery longevity (mAh) which shouldn't be a problem for a quartz watch with no digital display and no lighting system.

Next .. hit a few dollar stores. I've found a selection of "almost" all sizes at a couple of local stores in packages of 5 for $1 listed by the "AG" sizing names
Actually, you have to be careful, because there are some batteries that come in 1.5v and 3v in the same sizes (usually the AG sizes)--pay close attention to the chemistry (CR, SR/SW, LR). The CR versions have been developed for lighting use (LED and laser stuff). Those 3v ones actually come in the larger packages (like 10 on a card). I bought some of these accidentally once because they represented a good deal, and ended up with 10 batteries I can't really use.

(The Wikipedia page you referenced kind of contradicts itself. There's one paragraph that states that basically all batteries of the same size are interchangeable, yet in the example list there is a battery that breaks this rule.)

Example: CR927. Same size as SR927W, but lithium chemistry provides 3v instead of 1.5/1.55v. SR927W is a common size for watches (395 or 399 Renata), but the CR927 might toast it.

-s-
 

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Since you mentioned wikipedia. I'll toss in a off topic link that comes from my other life (non-watches)
Wikipedia: You Will Never Find a More Wretched Hive of Scum and Villainy

Virgil Griffith
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Not only the world's largest text-based MMO, Wikipedia is a staple of the Internet user's information diet. Because of this, Wikipedia is also laden with manipulation, forgery, and the downright unscrupulous. In a never before seen presentation, Virgil will mine deep into the bowels of Wikipedia to unearth nefarious deeds whose perpetrators never thought would see the light of day.
New software will be released at this talk. If you liked WikiScanner, you will like this more.
 
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