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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was replacing a NATO with a custom strap on my Seiko Samurai when my son (in his early teens) was curious about what I was doing. During part of the exercise I placed the bare watch on my wrist to show him how it "fits", that while the lugs are close to the edges of my wrist they were not hanging over my wrist when looking down on the watch. My wrist is 16.5cm/6.5" and his is 15cm or just under 6". I had him take of his Casio CA53W-1 Calculator watch and I placed my Samurai on his wrist to show him that it would be too long for him.

It fit :oops:

Well, it fit in the fact that the lugs were within the boundaries of his wrist as well; the lugs did not overhang at all! I was befuddled. We are both slender -- okay, we're skinny except I've got the old man spare tire-ish now while he has a natural six-pack like I did when I was his age 😒 so I fully expected the watch to not fit within the borders of his wrist.

I looked at our wrists and they are naturally more oval than being close to round and more flat on the top versus the bottom, with our forearms tapering noticably smaller just prior to meeting the wrist (we need to wear our watches below the bone). So I measured the top width of my wrist at the narrowest point where I wear my watches with my vernier calipers and it came in about 53.5mm. I then measured the same width of his wrist and it was about 51mm. Okay, that makes sense as to why the watch fit as we are very close in wrist width even though our diameters have over a 1/2" difference in them. With the strap on my Samurai he is 3 notches deeper into the strap from where my setting is.

It was through this little exercise I realized that using the wrist circumference is less accurate than if we were to use wrist width as the basis for measurement for wrist size. I think this could also explain why some watches seem to fit well on those where they maybe shouldn't using the conventional measurement.

My post title is ambiguous for a reason: I'm asking if redefining wrist size would even be possible but also if we could even start the trend to use the new way of measurement.

What say you on this topic?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wrist size and watch dimensions only serve as guidelines, not rules.

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Yes, of course they are to those who are familiar with the hobby. Even still, what is wrong with more accurate guidelines?
 

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I agree that wrist width is more relevant for estimating if a watch would fit than wrist circumference. By comparing wrist width with L2L length, you'll immediately see if the lugs would overhang or not.

I started a thread on this subject some time ago:

Feel free to add some more data points there. :) On average, the wrist width is 1/3 of the circumference. People who deviate from this average towards 1/2.9 or so will have it easier to wear comparatively larger watches.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
LOL, excellent @ffritz !

I'll post my measurements there, thanks (y)
 

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With AR & VR all the rage, it's hopefully just a matter of time till your phone can show you what any watch would look like on your wrist without ever leaving your couch.
That'd be pretty sweet actually.
 

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While wrists come in a variety of proportions, it seems most wrists, on average, have a width that is roughly 1/3 the circumference. For two rists of that same aspect ratio, half an inch difference in circumference translates to 4mm in width.

Sounds like your son's wrist is slightly flatter than yours.
 

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I think wrist watch fit has more to do with hand size, hand build and ring size.

Two people have the same size wrists. One of the people has had a white collar profession for 20 years and likes to read and practice music for enjoyment. The other person has had a blue collar, manual labor profession for 20 years and likes to ride motorcycles and fix cars for enjoyment. The manual labor person is going to have bigger and stronger hands and is going to be able to pull off a larger wrist watch.
 

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Also irrespective of size and shape you have some folks with portly wrists vs others with very little meat on them. The former more tolerant of a tighter strap without the associated loss of comfort you'd otherwise get. I suspect this has a lot to do with why some folks are adverse to larger watches while others can't understand why everyone doesn't love them.
 

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I run into this from time to time. My wrist is 7-7.25" but is quite flat with large wrist bones. So bracelets are always a dice roll for me depending on the link type and articulation. I can wear my Duro fine with the lug to lug basically being 50mm, but the weight of the watch makes it bobble around too much for me to wear it.

Conversely, the heavier SKX007 is awesome on an elastic paratrooper with the shorter lug to lug. It seems to nestle into the flat part of my wrist better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
My "Recommended Reading" threw this at me from @Chris Hughes :

From a more civil past it would appear.
 
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