WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I note that a lot of vintage watches that are sold online show the cases as having a brushed finish as opposed to the polished stainless look (which I assume most/many of them originally came with).

My question is two fold - why are watches refinished this way rather than the highly polished route and what tool is used to do it (I am assuming a dremel or similar, my question more relates to the tool/bit used).

I also note the brushing is done usually in straight lines radially from an approximate centre line.

Thanks for any advice on this - I have attached a pic just to make clear what I mean.

Richard
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
my guess: the vintage watches they are refurbishing have deep scars and blemishes that are too deep to be polished out. So instead you make thousands of other scratches (really, that's what you're doing when applying a brushed finish) that will mask the imperfections.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,842 Posts
On what are you basing the assumption that the brushed finish is not original?

The radial brushed finish you have pictured is very difficult to do correctly if you don't know what your doing and/or don't have a machine set up to do it right.

I have a dozen watches from the sixties and seventies that were originally finished with brushed finishes. There are many variations; some are radial (as your picture), some axial (in a circular pattern), some longitudinal (in the direction of the band), some just on the top, some on the top and sides.

The brushed finish was originally put on cases for a variety of reasons, sometimes to kill the bright reflection on military and dive watches, sometimes because a light/minor scratch on a brushed finish is less noticable or more easily fixed.

Deep scars aren't going to be hiden by brushing, or even bead blasting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
721 Posts
Brushed finishes or graining was / is popular among all the brands and styles. They range from a grit blast or fine grain to a rough deep grain. All require different techniques ranging from grit blasting, a lathe and counter rotating abrasive wheel or just plain hand graining with an abrasive patience and skill.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top