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The first one is correct, the second one is a ZIM watch (derivated from Lip movement) with bogus "creative" dial and ridicolous crown.
The third one has case, dial and hands original (except seconds hand). But the movement is from the Petrodvoretz (Raketa) factory.
About the ZIM, nowadays it's very hard to find one of those watches without fake pseudo-military dials. :roll:
 

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What can anyone tell me about the authenticity, origin, etc. of these listings on E-Bay? Any info is appreciated. :-s Thanks!
The clock is authentic and currently is going for a reasonable price. Actually, there are many of these, and related models, around eBay all the time. I know of several sellers who specialize in them.

The "naval watch" from the 40s is a fake. it's a modern redial with the wrong hands and crown. It is a worthless fantasy piece meant to deceive ignorant buyers. There is NOTHING desirable or collectable about this watch.

The Sturmanski is also toxic. To start with, it contains the wrong movement. This one was produced in the Petrodworzowy factory (famous for producing Raketa branded watches) which was located outside Leningrad (now St. Petersberg). The actual movement for this watch would have been manufacturered by the First Moscow Watch Factory (see attached photo). The crown is also wrong and the dial is in terrible condition. Considering that it is a worthless hodgepodge, the price the seller is asking for it is criminal. If you know where to shop on eBay you can get an authentic Sturmanki with the correct movement in good condition for about the same price.

Hope this helps...

-- Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thanks! Great info...

Can you tell me more about the clocks on E-Bay...? where they are made, the history, etc. I want to pick one up, but want to know more about what I am getting... Here are some links to ones I found interesting. Would really like to know more about them... any on E-Bay made at the 1st MWF?

A couple of these posts may be redundant... just grabbed a couple to show...

Also, Mark, you mention knowing where to look for a Sturmanskie like you have pictured... can you offer more info on that front?

thanks!

http://cgi.ebay.ca/Russian-Military...3QQihZ002QQcategoryZ66528QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

http://cgi.ebay.ca/161-Rare-Russian...0QQihZ004QQcategoryZ90974QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

http://cgi.ebay.ca/A378-Rare-Russia...0QQihZ004QQcategoryZ90974QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

http://cgi.ebay.ca/940-Rare-Russian...1QQihZ004QQcategoryZ90974QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
 

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Soviet Flight Chronometers

Thanks! Great info... Can you tell me more about the clocks on E-Bay...? where they are made, the history, etc. I want to pick one up, but want to know more about what I am getting... ]
The first Soviet flight chronographs (borduhren) were manufactured in Switzerland for the Soviet Air Force in 1935 by Jaeger Le Coultre. The dial on these 'Chronoflight' clocks was customized with Cyrillic explanatory markings -- "8-Day Movement", "Flight Time" and "Seconds Timer". (See the attached photo.)

The Soviet Government continued to purchase these clocks from Jaeger until 1939, when arrangements were made to manufacture them in Russia under a license from the Swiss firm. The model was designated '450n'.

Originally, these clocks were made in Moscow by the First Moscow Watch Factory. Great care was taken in the manufacture of these clocks. In fact, the movements of Moscow-made 450n’s were gold plated. (See attached photo.) With the onset of World War Two, production was shifted to Tschelabinsk, in Siberia, where it remained until present times.

The 450n is quite literally the granddaddy of all the flight chronos produced in Russia ever since. Soviet horologists refined and adapted the model continuously from 1941 through the 1980s to produce a large family of clocks for air and naval use. I won’t attach photos of commonly available variants because they are pictured on eBay all the time, but I do include a photo of a rarer naval version.

I should also add that the dials on the 2 early clocks contain so much radium-based lume that they knock the needle on my dosimeter (Geiger counter) off scale -- even at 10 cm -- triggering the 'danger' alarm. Clocks made since the 1960s were available with two different types of ‘safe’ lume. One version used a non-radioactive phosphorescent paste, similar to the lume used on wristwatches. The other version used a fluorescent dye that glows when exposed to ultraviolet light emitted by a tube in the cockpit.

These chronographs are rich in history, technically sophisticated at and fun to play with. They make a great subject for a collection.

Hope this helps.

-- Mark
 

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