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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A year ago I started discussing a project with Chronoswiss. I have always deeply loved my Sirius artist (one of 10 ever made in this configuration!), but the movement, while beautifully guilloched, didn't quite meet my expectations in terms of polishing and looked a little "rough". Since this is a special piece for me, and I cannot express how much I love the dial and the case (the best I have ever had the chance to see on my wrist, as simple as that), I needed to see what could be done to elevate the movement.
I contacted the manufacture in Switzerland, and got a response from their new head of operations, Beat Weinmann. He had recently left Ochs und Junior and it was a pleasant surprise to hear from him.

We went over the details by email and Facetime, and then he reviewed what could be done with Marion Müller, an incredibly gifted watchmaker (you can google her to find many cool accomplishments, though you might find more things if you search in French or German). We discussed everything that would be done, in a precise way, with multiple examples and pictures from pieces as prestigious as the Dufour simplicity, the Akrivia chronomètre contemporain, some Grönefeld and Voutilainen. Of course, everything is relative and I do not pretend the Chronoswiss is on par with those. The idea was to define the style and to adapt what we could with the movement we had. I also really wanted to preserve the work of Maïk Panziera on the bridges, as that guillochage is mesmerizing and a work of art. It is also a good response to the dial's patterns. So here we had the style: baroque and old world decorations, with clean execution, while keeping the guillochage on the bridges.

In January 2021, I sent the watch to Lucerne.

We defined the anglage that we could do on the bridges, and this was especially challenging given that the guilloche had to be preserved. For the screws, they needed to be mirror polished and heat treated, it turned out that we needed to get rid of the blue color that became uneven, and I am glad we did. I think it looks more appropriate this way. All the settings for the screws and jewels were mirror polished. The same treatment was applied to the barrel wheel's ratchet.
Then the regulating organ was to be fully polished too, and this makes for an exciting contrast with the bridges.

Then we came to the barrel wheel, what to do? Many finishing techniques can be applied, and Marion's favorite is a classically German-inspired snailing and double snailing. Similar decorations exist on Lang and Heyne movements, some Voutilainen, or even Dornbluth and we can either give it a frost effect or add contrast by highlighting the polish marks. I tend to trust the masters of their crafts and let her decide the best course of action. It looks fairly pronounced and the contrast with the mirror polished screw in the center is all the more appealing.

The going train wheels were also polished and the sharp cuts are gone, now replaced by a smooth transition at the end of the arms, which should really shine in the flesh.

The final touch was an inscription on the dial. "Pièce Unique". This could have been printed on the dial but instead, it was André Martinez who hand-painted it. For those of you who don't know him, he is a very famous artist who specializes in miniature paintings, and works on watch dials for Bovet, Hermès, or Fabergé among other prestigious brands.

I like to think of this piece as the ultimate "Artist" watch, because of the collaborations of a master enameler and guillocheur (Maïk), a master watchmaker (Marion), and a painter (André). Three forms of arts that have coexisted for many years, and sometimes interconnect through specific projects to keep them alive.

The pictures below were kindly taken by Chronoswiss this morning as they were preparing to ship the watch. I cannot wait to look at it under a loupe and to put it on my wrist. I will add more pictures and macros when I can.

Thanks for reading and please feel free to comment or ask questions, I will happily answer what I can!

Edit: for information, you can check out what the dial and movement looked like before the modification here. Fratello got my EXACT watch to review in 2014 (you can see the serial numbers match). Hands-On Chronoswiss Sirius Artist review

Watch Brown Analog watch Gold Clock


Watch Analog watch Watch accessory Clock Material property


Brown Watch Analog watch Clock Font


Watch Analog watch Clock Watch accessory Font
 

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Wow! That looks fantastic, congratulations! I worked with Beat when I bought my ochs years ago, and then again when I sent it back to them for a complete re-style, that was just before he left there. Terrific guy to work with.

The finishing looks marvelous, and I think you've made wonderful choices. Can't wait to see some macros to really appreciate the details.

I've always liked Chronoswiss' designs, but like you, I wasn't impressed enough with their finishing to pull the trigger on one (I always was particularly tempted by the Delphis).

I'm sure you're counting the hours until it arrives...
 

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That's.. sublime.

I know the question will come up, so I'll just ask it: how much (aprox) do they charge for this kind of customization?
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the compliments!

That's.. sublime.

I know the question will come up, so I'll just ask it: how much (aprox) do they charge for this kind of customization?
They charge based on each component's finishing, everything added up to $11.5k in my case.

The things I didn't do were:
  • Gold chatons around the jewels ($4k additional); I did some mockups and it didn't look great, the skeletonization of the movement makes it look lighter while the chatons reinforce the "strength" feeling of the movement. That's why it goes so well on an ALS with huge bridges or mainplates. Voutilainen also doesn't use a lot of gold chatons probably for contrast, it really depends on each watchmaker. And in my case the train wheels are not made of gold, so the clash of colors would not have been favorable I believe.
  • Fine grinding of the mainplate ($2.6k additional); I did not see the advantage because I like the perlage of the mainplate already.
  • Add a gold plaque on the back with an engraving "handcrafted for XX" or a date/phrase/etc. similar to Voutilainen or Dufour plaques ($3.2k additional); there wasn't a lot of space available on the bridges since it is a partially skeletonized movement, so it didn't look quite right when I made mockups. I wanted originally to do it with a "Chronoswiss x Marion Müller" inscription but it would have been too small.
 

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This is an absolutely gorgeous piece and I am extremely jealous! The anglage work is lovely and I like how you preserved the original guilloche. Did you consider having the gear teeth / balance wheel finished? I also notice what seems to be a blued screw (third photo, bottom left)?
 

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That's insane. Love it.
 

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A year ago I started discussing a project with Chronoswiss. I have always deeply loved my Sirius artist (one of 10 ever made in this configuration!), but the movement, while beautifully guilloched, didn't quite meet my expectations in terms of polishing and looked a little "rough". Since this is a special piece for me, and I cannot express how much I love the dial and the case (the best I have ever had the chance to see on my wrist, as simple as that), I needed to see what could be done to elevate the movement.
I contacted the manufacture in Switzerland, and got a response from their new head of operations, Beat Weinmann. He had recently left Ochs und Junior and it was a pleasant surprise to hear from him.

We went over the details by email and Facetime, and then he reviewed what could be done with Marion Müller, an incredibly gifted watchmaker (you can google her to find many cool accomplishments, though you might find more things if you search in French or German). We discussed everything that would be done, in a precise way, with multiple examples and pictures from pieces as prestigious as the Dufour simplicity, the Akrivia chronomètre contemporain, some Grönefeld and Voutilainen. Of course, everything is relative and I do not pretend the Chronoswiss is on par with those. The idea was to define the style and to adapt what we could with the movement we had. I also really wanted to preserve the work of Maïk Panziera on the bridges, as that guillochage is mesmerizing and a work of art. It is also a good response to the dial's patterns. So here we had the style: baroque and old world decorations, with clean execution, while keeping the guillochage on the bridges.

In January 2021, I sent the watch to Lucerne.

We defined the anglage that we could do on the bridges, and this was especially challenging given that the guilloche had to be preserved. For the screws, they needed to be mirror polished and heat treated, it turned out that we needed to get rid of the blue color that became uneven, and I am glad we did. I think it looks more appropriate this way. All the settings for the screws and jewels were mirror polished. The same treatment was applied to the barrel wheel's ratchet.
Then the regulating organ was to be fully polished too, and this makes for an exciting contrast with the bridges.

Then we came to the barrel wheel, what to do? Many finishing techniques can be applied, and Marion's favorite is a classically German-inspired snailing and double snailing. Similar decorations exist on Lang and Heyne movements, some Voutilainen, or even Dornbluth and we can either give it a frost effect or add contrast by highlighting the polish marks. I tend to trust the masters of their crafts and let her decide the best course of action. It looks fairly pronounced and the contrast with the mirror polished screw in the center is all the more appealing.

The going train wheels were also polished and the sharp cuts are gone, now replaced by a smooth transition at the end of the arms, which should really shine in the flesh.

The final touch was an inscription on the dial. "Pièce Unique". This could have been printed on the dial but instead, it was André Martinez who hand-painted it. For those of you who don't know him, he is a very famous artist who specializes in miniature paintings, and works on watch dials for Bovet, Hermès, or Fabergé among other prestigious brands.

I like to think of this piece as the ultimate "Artist" watch, because of the collaborations of a master enameler and guillocheur (Maïk), a master watchmaker (Marion), and a painter (André). Three forms of arts that have coexisted for many years, and sometimes interconnect through specific projects to keep them alive.

The pictures below were kindly taken by Chronoswiss this morning as they were preparing to ship the watch. I cannot wait to look at it under a loupe and to put it on my wrist. I will add more pictures and macros when I can.

Thanks for reading and please feel free to comment or ask questions, I will happily answer what I can!

Edit: for information, you can check out what the dial and movement looked like before the modification here. Fratello got my EXACT watch to review in 2014 (you can see the serial numbers match). Hands-On Chronoswiss Sirius Artist review

View attachment 16119047

View attachment 16119049

View attachment 16119052

View attachment 16119051
That is one good-looking watch and I'm glad to hear Chronoswiss was so accommodating.
I wish more brands would do the same for their customers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This is an absolutely gorgeous piece and I am extremely jealous! The anglage work is lovely and I like how you preserved the original guilloche. Did you consider having the gear teeth / balance wheel finished? I also notice what seems to be a blued screw (third photo, bottom left)?
I also noticed the screw right after posting and contacted them, we'll see what happens.

The gear teeth have been polished, and it's not easy to see in those pictures, maybe on the 3rd one you see some reflections on them from the train and the bridges. Below is a zoom in the picture. I will probably see it better when I have it and can take macros, but I was also told that over-polishing the teeth results in poor performance.

Automotive tire Crankset Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Automotive design


The balance wheel has also been polished, and I think what we see is because the caseback was maybe not very clean (as you can see by the hair over the mainspring barrel). But you can see the reflections on the balance wheel. Again, I will have to see it in person.

Wheel Tire Crankset Automotive tire Automotive lighting
 

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I am extremely impressed with the ability and imagination of some gents to spend money on a watch, it is incredible what rich people throw their money into.
 

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This is absolutely spectacular. Can't wait to see more pictures. A truly legendary watch.
 
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That is amazing work by truly gifted artisans. I'm honestly shocked it was so reasonably priced. Bravo!

Sent from my SM-G991U using Tapatalk
 

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A year ago I started discussing a project with Chronoswiss. I have always deeply loved my Sirius artist (one of 10 ever made in this configuration!), but the movement, while beautifully guilloched, didn't quite meet my expectations in terms of polishing and looked a little "rough". Since this is a special piece for me, and I cannot express how much I love the dial and the case (the best I have ever had the chance to see on my wrist, as simple as that), I needed to see what could be done to elevate the movement.
I contacted the manufacture in Switzerland, and got a response from their new head of operations, Beat Weinmann. He had recently left Ochs und Junior and it was a pleasant surprise to hear from him.

We went over the details by email and Facetime, and then he reviewed what could be done with Marion Müller, an incredibly gifted watchmaker (you can google her to find many cool accomplishments, though you might find more things if you search in French or German). We discussed everything that would be done, in a precise way, with multiple examples and pictures from pieces as prestigious as the Dufour simplicity, the Akrivia chronomètre contemporain, some Grönefeld and Voutilainen. Of course, everything is relative and I do not pretend the Chronoswiss is on par with those. The idea was to define the style and to adapt what we could with the movement we had. I also really wanted to preserve the work of Maïk Panziera on the bridges, as that guillochage is mesmerizing and a work of art. It is also a good response to the dial's patterns. So here we had the style: baroque and old world decorations, with clean execution, while keeping the guillochage on the bridges.

In January 2021, I sent the watch to Lucerne.

We defined the anglage that we could do on the bridges, and this was especially challenging given that the guilloche had to be preserved. For the screws, they needed to be mirror polished and heat treated, it turned out that we needed to get rid of the blue color that became uneven, and I am glad we did. I think it looks more appropriate this way. All the settings for the screws and jewels were mirror polished. The same treatment was applied to the barrel wheel's ratchet.
Then the regulating organ was to be fully polished too, and this makes for an exciting contrast with the bridges.

Then we came to the barrel wheel, what to do? Many finishing techniques can be applied, and Marion's favorite is a classically German-inspired snailing and double snailing. Similar decorations exist on Lang and Heyne movements, some Voutilainen, or even Dornbluth and we can either give it a frost effect or add contrast by highlighting the polish marks. I tend to trust the masters of their crafts and let her decide the best course of action. It looks fairly pronounced and the contrast with the mirror polished screw in the center is all the more appealing.

The going train wheels were also polished and the sharp cuts are gone, now replaced by a smooth transition at the end of the arms, which should really shine in the flesh.

The final touch was an inscription on the dial. "Pièce Unique". This could have been printed on the dial but instead, it was André Martinez who hand-painted it. For those of you who don't know him, he is a very famous artist who specializes in miniature paintings, and works on watch dials for Bovet, Hermès, or Fabergé among other prestigious brands.

I like to think of this piece as the ultimate "Artist" watch, because of the collaborations of a master enameler and guillocheur (Maïk), a master watchmaker (Marion), and a painter (André). Three forms of arts that have coexisted for many years, and sometimes interconnect through specific projects to keep them alive.

The pictures below were kindly taken by Chronoswiss this morning as they were preparing to ship the watch. I cannot wait to look at it under a loupe and to put it on my wrist. I will add more pictures and macros when I can.

Thanks for reading and please feel free to comment or ask questions, I will happily answer what I can!

Edit: for information, you can check out what the dial and movement looked like before the modification here. Fratello got my EXACT watch to review in 2014 (you can see the serial numbers match). Hands-On Chronoswiss Sirius Artist review

View attachment 16119047

View attachment 16119049

View attachment 16119052

View attachment 16119051
ar7iste, thanks for posting this. This is one of the most enjoyable posts I have seen since joining. The level of detail was incredible and I learned so much.
 

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Beautiful Chronoswiss, thank you for sharing. It is a wonderful reminder what they are capable of!
 
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I also noticed the screw right after posting and contacted them, we'll see what happens.

The gear teeth have been polished, and it's not easy to see in those pictures, maybe on the 3rd one you see some reflections on them from the train and the bridges. Below is a zoom in the picture. I will probably see it better when I have it and can take macros, but I was also told that over-polishing the teeth results in poor performance.
Huh, I never knew that polishing the teeth could cause that! It's a very subtle and well done polish that I didn't see at first glance.
 

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This is what watchmaking is all about. Just beautiful.
 
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A year ago I started discussing a project with Chronoswiss. I have always deeply loved my Sirius artist (one of 10 ever made in this configuration!), but the movement, while beautifully guilloched, didn't quite meet my expectations in terms of polishing and looked a little "rough". Since this is a special piece for me, and I cannot express how much I love the dial and the case (the best I have ever had the chance to see on my wrist, as simple as that), I needed to see what could be done to elevate the movement.
I contacted the manufacture in Switzerland, and got a response from their new head of operations, Beat Weinmann. He had recently left Ochs und Junior and it was a pleasant surprise to hear from him.

We went over the details by email and Facetime, and then he reviewed what could be done with Marion Müller, an incredibly gifted watchmaker (you can google her to find many cool accomplishments, though you might find more things if you search in French or German). We discussed everything that would be done, in a precise way, with multiple examples and pictures from pieces as prestigious as the Dufour simplicity, the Akrivia chronomètre contemporain, some Grönefeld and Voutilainen. Of course, everything is relative and I do not pretend the Chronoswiss is on par with those. The idea was to define the style and to adapt what we could with the movement we had. I also really wanted to preserve the work of Maïk Panziera on the bridges, as that guillochage is mesmerizing and a work of art. It is also a good response to the dial's patterns. So here we had the style: baroque and old world decorations, with clean execution, while keeping the guillochage on the bridges.

In January 2021, I sent the watch to Lucerne.

We defined the anglage that we could do on the bridges, and this was especially challenging given that the guilloche had to be preserved. For the screws, they needed to be mirror polished and heat treated, it turned out that we needed to get rid of the blue color that became uneven, and I am glad we did. I think it looks more appropriate this way. All the settings for the screws and jewels were mirror polished. The same treatment was applied to the barrel wheel's ratchet.
Then the regulating organ was to be fully polished too, and this makes for an exciting contrast with the bridges.

Then we came to the barrel wheel, what to do? Many finishing techniques can be applied, and Marion's favorite is a classically German-inspired snailing and double snailing. Similar decorations exist on Lang and Heyne movements, some Voutilainen, or even Dornbluth and we can either give it a frost effect or add contrast by highlighting the polish marks. I tend to trust the masters of their crafts and let her decide the best course of action. It looks fairly pronounced and the contrast with the mirror polished screw in the center is all the more appealing.

The going train wheels were also polished and the sharp cuts are gone, now replaced by a smooth transition at the end of the arms, which should really shine in the flesh.

The final touch was an inscription on the dial. "Pièce Unique". This could have been printed on the dial but instead, it was André Martinez who hand-painted it. For those of you who don't know him, he is a very famous artist who specializes in miniature paintings, and works on watch dials for Bovet, Hermès, or Fabergé among other prestigious brands.

I like to think of this piece as the ultimate "Artist" watch, because of the collaborations of a master enameler and guillocheur (Maïk), a master watchmaker (Marion), and a painter (André). Three forms of arts that have coexisted for many years, and sometimes interconnect through specific projects to keep them alive.

The pictures below were kindly taken by Chronoswiss this morning as they were preparing to ship the watch. I cannot wait to look at it under a loupe and to put it on my wrist. I will add more pictures and macros when I can.

Thanks for reading and please feel free to comment or ask questions, I will happily answer what I can!

Edit: for information, you can check out what the dial and movement looked like before the modification here. Fratello got my EXACT watch to review in 2014 (you can see the serial numbers match). Hands-On Chronoswiss Sirius Artist review

View attachment 16119047

View attachment 16119049

View attachment 16119052

View attachment 16119051
Wow, just simply WOW. This looks like a masterpiece. Thanks for sharing!
 
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