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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know its a watch forum, I have a keen interest in watches and am hoping to develop a prototype of one for my final major project starting in a couple of months, this project is precursor to it...

I am currently making a cut throat razor... I need to attach the blade to the handle in the least obtrusive way. Ideally I would like to drill two small holes on the inside of the handle and then use a spring pin to attach the blade. This would allow removal when required.

Dimensions:

2mm hole in blade
3mm blade width
5mm gap between the internal sides of the handle.

(I know this leaves little space)

Questions

1.I can find 2mm pins but as they are for watches they are often 18mm+... does anyone know if I could alter one by disassembling it, cutting the tube down and reassembling? I need to buy one and have a look how I would do this but do you think its possible...

2. Can you think of any other ways I could go about doing this, ideally without having to drill a hole right through the handle.

3. I am looking do do something similar to the pin attachment to the lugs of a watch... how are the holes drilled for lugs that are not soldered on? could the process be used in a gap of only 5mm?

Thanks in advance for any ideas.
 

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The idea of a removable blade is intriguing. I would not recommend actual watchmaking spring bars however as they are not strong enough. They are hollow tubes with a small spring similar but smaller diameter than a ball point pen spring and two ends. Having said that I do think the design might work and you could build your own spring pins. Maybe tubes the length of the inner distance between the handle parts. Maybe 3 mm in diameter with a 1.5 mm hole through them. Find a spring that fits length and diameter leaving length for the end pieces. The end pieces might be tee shaped. This cutaway sketch hopefully isn't too sketchy! Make them of stainless or brass, brass being easy to cut and stainless more durable. Both being rust resistant. Make tolerances close but not tight as you want the end pieces to press in easily enough. Oh, and we want pictures of the finished product!

Photo on 2012-12-10 at 17.11.jpg

Having holes that don't go all the way through the handle will complicate it but may be doable. The problem is how to remove the blade once installed. With a blind hole you will need to make some provision of accessing the tee ends from the inside so you can compress them when trying to release the blade from the handle. A linear notch cut in the tube to allow a pin or small screwdriver like object to engage and pull back the tee end. Alternate method might be a very small hole through the handle that a pin could enter to push the tee end in. Good luck
 

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Please pardon me in advance for being pedantic, but as a longtime straight-razor shaver, I'll point out that straights don't have handles.

They have scales.
 

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Pedantic? Are you kidding me? If you are here long enough and ask the wrong question we will crucify you! Just kidding, actually I don't know squat about straight razors so I appreciate the edimacation. I am curious about the making of a razor. Is this a profession or a hobby? How do you make the blade? Pictures would be very cool.
 

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Well I don't make the blades. I 'inherit' them from 19th-century Englishmen. All I really do is shave with them and keep them in good nick (as the Brits say, appropriately in this context).

There are good forums, etc. over at Straight Razor Place - Welcome to Straight Razor Place
(No, I have no affiliation with them!)

Neither a profession nor a hobby, really, since it's a practical part of daily (ok, maybe weekly) life. I just like the sound it makes as it hacks its way through the beard, and the feeling afterwards. And I like the idea that after I go, someone else will use it, on and on for hundreds of years if it's well cared for.

And all I ever have to buy is soap.
 

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We could continue this fascinating thread if only we could tie watches in somehow. Perhaps a watch imbedded in the scale of a razor. I personally am frightened by straight razors, too many horror movies maybe. I did see not long ago a barber shop open in a very upscale mall near Seattle that offered a straight razor shave and haircut. It is no longer 50 cents however. I believe it was more like $150. Now that is cutthroat!
 

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Well the only real tie-in with watches is that you get to use some really interesting honing materials on the blade, and you learn to feel the difference between, say, hard stainless and softer carbon steel. I've been using Shapton's glass-backed waterstones as high as 16000 grit (though they come twice that fine as well). Pretty neat stuff. (Normally, of course, you just strop a razor, but once in a while you have to restore the edge by honing. Stropping is pretty neat in itself: you're not removing any metal, just straightening out the tiny "hairs" on the blade's edge.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Firstly thank you to everyone who has replied, especially Decattoo for your great reply. Phoobo, you are correct, I just didn't want to confuse anyone as it is not a razor forum! :)

Update: I have now finalised the design and it has been sent for full material prototype manufacture alongside a badger brush handle and shaving soap pot. If you are interested I will post them when they are back with me.

In terms of the watch tie in, it doesn't have anything to do with them except the initial strap pin. I have resolved the issue, Decattoo you were right, a watch spring pin wasn't appropriate. I have instead gone with a simpler, stronger assembly which can be removed for servicing by sacrificing one of the end pins which would just be replaced. It is compression fitted and the pins act as a spacer to prevent lateral movement of the blade. I have posted an image just in case you are interested.

Pivot Assembly.jpg
 

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Please do come back with finished pictures. I suspect you may have considered this already. If you reduce the diameter of the end piece from 4mm to say 2.5mm and shorten the tube between the scales by 2.5mm and install a spring in the tube you wouldn't have to sacrifice the ends to remove them. Might have to make the endpiece dimension 1.89mm a little longer as well. Whatever you do, best of luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thats not a bad idea, I went with the idea above for a couple of reasons... use of springs would have meant leaving enough tolerance for pin removal, this would have been a bit of a moisture trap, especially because of the humid environment it is used in, whilst the materials may not rust, it would leave a build up. I was also not certain 1mm was enough of a gap to provide enough strength, whilst I know it is only a razor and isn't under a lot of force, I wouldn't want to be on the end of a complaint if it was to fail and cut someone. By using the compression fit it is impossible for anyone to remove the blade on their own (because they would have to make their own pivot end for reassembly).

Thanks for the idea though, I was going to go with a very similar idea until this came up.

Ill keep you posted, Thanks for your advice. There is a Badger Brush and Soap Tub being made too, Ill post those just to show you the set.
 

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Very nice work. I've used a straight razor for years (Filarmonica Doble Temple 6/8), and used to collect them. Most have been sold except for the Filly. Your scales look great (as does the soap bowl and brush handle). How is the balance between the heavy brass scales and the blade? I'd think it'd be quite heavy? However, nicely done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Very nice work. I've used a straight razor for years (Filarmonica Doble Temple 6/8), and used to collect them. Most have been sold except for the Filly. Your scales look great (as does the soap bowl and brush handle). How is the balance between the heavy brass scales and the blade? I'd think it'd be quite heavy? However, nicely done.
The scales are fine when vertical but as soon as they go off balance they are a bit too heavy... I thought this may be be the case but then thats what prototyping is for! There is scope to remove a lot more material than in the current prototype hopefully bringing the weight down.

Thanks everyone else for feedback as well.
 
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