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Discussion Starter #1
Hello!
I've not posted in quite some time. But I figured this was the best place to look for an answer.

I was getting a battery installed in a old Seiko Chrono that I have and noticed a silver pocket watch.
The owner let me take a look and stated that it had been sitting for quite some time. It still runs and keeps perfect time.
After a little haggling (I still probably paid too much), I walked out with this CYMA pocket watch and an manual wind Darwil.

The front face (crystal) opens, and the back has 2 seperate lids. (dust cover?) It states that it is antimagnetic, 3 adjustments and 15 jewel.
The only number that I can find is on the case itself. I would like to get some more information on the watch and it's age.
Regardless, I really like it and intend to wear it as much as possible and it keeps really good time.
I would just like to learn more about it.
CYMA 3.JPG CYMA 2.JPG CYMA1.JPG
 

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Zenith Forum Co-moderator
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Going by Ranfft's examples, it seems as if Cyma tended to put the serial numbers under the dial. So, you will have to wait until the next service (which should be pretty soon anyway if you intend to use that watch unless you can be sure that the previous owner had seen to that). Until then, the hallmarks on the silver case might help you date it to within a few years.

Hartmut Richter
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you. I was curious about the serial number. And thanks for the reference. I've found quite a bit about the history of CYMA but not much about case numbers and such.
I'll admit that I'm a novice to pocket watches, but if the winding action is any indicator, this watch seems to be in pretty good shape. Nice and smooth. My Elgin winds OK but has a certain amount of resistance as though it needs a good servicing. (which it's going to get next week).

Another question. Why would the crystal be hinged?
 

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Zenith Forum Co-moderator
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Another question. Why would the crystal be hinged?
They always were in the old days. I don't know for certain why but I suspect that it is because the old crystals were real glass and needed to be removed before you could get the movement out - so it is better to affix the crystal inside a metal rim only once and hinge that rim so that you could get at the dial and movement that way rather than risk breaking the glass all the time.

Hartmut Richter
 
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