WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
440 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Is it detrimental to the watch's health?

I have a manual wind right now, and even when I don't use it, I just keep winding it every 2 days or so to keep it going. I somehow didn't like the idea that my watch will "stop" - Not only concerning the oil on the parts, but also the effort it takes to manually set the time again.

However, because it is a manual wind, I have to turn the crown about 30~40 times to reach the full power reserve. I suddenly realized that it might somehow damage the crown, hence resulting in the shorter life span of a watch. I never experienced this myself but heard many servicing of the watch concerns the "replacement of a crown".

Should I just leave my manual wind watch as it is when I'm not using it? (I use it about 1 time per week) If I keep on winding the crown that much everyday, will it shorten the life span of my watch significantly (> 1 year) compared to only winding it when needed?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,970 Posts
Only speaking from my experience, but I own several manual winds, with the most recent of them being made in the 80's, and none have required a crown being replaced. The only one that looks worn down a bit is a gold IWC piece but that's from either the late 1940's or early Fifties.

Granted I haven't worn any of them a year in a row, but some I've worn as a daily wearer say for a month or two... with no issues.

I personally think a manual wind watch that would require servicing and/or replacement of the crown after only a year of use would sound pretty useless in my book. I'm sure winding stems commonly get worn down to the point they need replacing but I would guess that would have to be after years of daily use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,877 Posts
Should I just leave my manual wind watch as it is when I'm not using it? (I use it about 1 time per week) If I keep on winding the crown that much everyday, will it shorten the life span of my watch significantly (> 1 year) compared to only winding it when needed?
Provided that your hand-wound watch has no date.

If you can, wind the watch at the exact time where it stopped previously, you won't need to set the time again.

And do that one day before the day you want to wear it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
440 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Provided that your hand-wound watch has no date.

If you can, wind the watch at the exact time where it stopped previously, you won't need to set the time again.

And do that one day before the day you want to wear it.


Mine is a time-only watch. And hey, wow that sounds pretty useful! :p
 

·
Moderator Public Forum
Joined
·
22,625 Posts
Wind it when you wear it. I would not wind it every day just for the sake of winding.
+1
Other than the momentary tactile pleasure of turning a crown there is no reason to keep either a hand or rotor wound watch running when not worn. The only possible exception being the few really complicated watches.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,970 Posts
For watches one doesn't really wear everyday, I actually prefer a manual wind over an auto.

Like others noted here, it's no real bother to pull it out of the drawer set the time, wind it and go about your business for the day.

I don't own an auto winder so it seems odd starting up an auto, setting time and only wearing it a day and letting it run out its power back in the drawer 30 or so hours later. Autos feel more like watches you NEED to wear days/weeks/months in a row. Probably to some here maybe that's an odd sentiment, but that's how I feel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,243 Posts
Imagine if that manual watch was someone's only watch. He wouldn't have this dilemma. He would wind it everyday and just enjoy it.
I wear my speedy a week at a time and I wind it 2-3 times a day.
BTW, the total number of crown turning is the same whether I wind it once every two days or 3 times a day.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
65,019 Posts
The crown stems etc on manual wind watches tend to be more robust than those of autos that can be wound so your watch should come to no harm. From what you've said though I would think that a wind and time set prior to your wearing it is what's best suited.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,424 Posts
Winding the watch is no more detrimental to the crown than walking is detrimental to your feet. At some point both will suffer wear. The good news is a crown can be replaced easily for a (usually) modest cost.

Setting a watch without a date function is a 20 or 30 second process, hardly a chore.
 

·
Moderator Public Forum
Joined
·
22,625 Posts
Winding the watch is no more detrimental to the crown than walking is detrimental to your feet. At some point both will suffer wear. The good news is a crown can be replaced easily for a (usually) modest cost.

Setting a watch without a date function is a 20 or 30 second process, hardly a chore.
It's been a while since high school biology but my recollection is that many species including us bipeds have developed the ability to shed and replace cells with no trip to the repair shop needed. Unless watches now enjoy features like cell division a watch repairman will be needed.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,838 Posts
For watches one doesn't really wear everyday, I actually prefer a manual wind over an auto.

Like others noted here, it's no real bother to pull it out of the drawer set the time, wind it and go about your business for the day.

I don't own an auto winder so it seems odd starting up an auto, setting time and only wearing it a day and letting it run out its power back in the drawer 30 or so hours later. Autos feel more like watches you NEED to wear days/weeks/months in a row. Probably to some here maybe that's an odd sentiment, but that's how I feel.
I agree. Part of the problem is that automatic watches often have less robust hand winding functionality, since more robust components in this aspect come at the expense of automatic winding efficiency. If you're only to wear a watch irregularly, it doesn't make sense to keep it fully wound on the winder, and it's more convenient to give it a couple of turns of the crown, setting the time, and going on your way.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,838 Posts
Winding the watch is no more detrimental to the crown than walking is detrimental to your feet. At some point both will suffer wear. The good news is a crown can be replaced easily for a (usually) modest cost.

Setting a watch without a date function is a 20 or 30 second process, hardly a chore.
This is why you should get a manual wind dress watch without a second hand or a date, then setting the time is a breeze.
 
  • Like
Reactions: humanalien

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,377 Posts
I have 2 meca without date so personally I wind it before strapping it on. Now I have a regular rotation so all my 4 watches get worn every weeks, hence I would presume the oil dry out isn't likely to happen.
Assuming the watches are not being worn it should be wound on a weekly basis or monthly at worse to keep the mechanic in good health IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,977 Posts
Manual watches have been used for over a century now with daily winding being expected. Manual wind design is built around daily watch winding, so there should be no worries about crown\stem life.
If only worn once a week though, I'd let it run down and set time when you are about to use it. Wear on movement parts other than crown can be reduced that way.

One addl comment - unless it's your only watch, I'd suggest avoiding screw-down crowns on a handwound watch. I've seen some of these being sold and they make 0 sense. Screwing and unscrewing the crown constantly can indeed damage the stem after a while.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,370 Posts
Don't wind it if your not going to use it, it's uneeded wear, thats like idling your car when not using it... well almost.
When you do use it, dont give the handwinding a second thought, it was designed for it and will probobly last your lifetime
unless it's real old and your real young.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
496 Posts
Manual wind watches have a much more durable mechanism for the winding (lol don't know the specific name)
, as they are designed to be wound daily. If you weren't able to wind your manual wind daily, then it's like saying
you aren't allowed to wear your watch every day! Which sounds ludicrous. lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,978 Posts
When I first joined this forum I asked a question similar to the OP's and somebody (I forget who) responded with a nice piece of advice "a watch that hasn't been kept wound is not stopped, it is 'resting'". I would wind it up and let it run every month or two if I never wore it, though...
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top