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Hello all, at the risk of sounding like a rookie watch collector (which I am!) i have always thought that the dial window type is the material from which the watche's window is made of...!!!! Can you guys confirm me that when it says mineral, or hardlex or scratch resistant sapphire it is indeed made of this material!! And in another almost ignorant question, of all the materials used in watches, which is the most resistant??... Thanks!!
 

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There are several type of crystal used in watches, if that is the question.

There is sapphire glass, mineral glass and there are several variations on the plastic crystal.

If you search around here, you will find many a thread extolling the virtues of each type, and damning all others.
 

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There seems to be some connectivity missing in the way you formed your question, but I think I understand what you mean. The 'dial window' you refer to is indeed the window of the watch, what we call the crystal. Hardlex itself is a Seiko specific material, known to most as a high grade of mineral crystal. As for hardness, Sapphire is the top, but along with that the argument for possible breaking due to being more brittle can be made (typically an erroneous argument if you ask me, but valid none-the-less). Mineral crystal and Seiko's Hardlex are of a reasonably scratch resistant quality and maintain enough flex that if you drop the watch you're less likely that it will break or shatter than with a sapphire crystal. I personally won't do anything less than sapphire, but I've never had one break even upon dropping, so that's a personal preference. If I were you, I wouldn't hesitate to buy a watch with mineral or Hardlex, the chances are you aren't going to do anything to harm it in, even in everyday play. Another couple of things to think about when it comes to crystals are flat vs. rounded and recessed vs. flush or even protruding.
 

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Lysanderxiii raises another good point, I didn't even bother mentioning the different plastics used, which have the advantage of being a softer surface thus it's fairly simple to buff out scratches from them and they're very flexible so you shouldn't ever have to worry about breaking or shattering one.
 

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Im still trying to figure out the difference between a dial window and a watch window...:-s
I think he was asking are the two the same. I'm guessing he doesn't know the WIS lingo and he calls it a watch window.
 
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