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I’ve never experienced a loose or self rotating internal bezel issue on my DH 1970, it’s the 44mm case.
 

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I have three DH 1970 watches, both 40 mm and 44 mm, from the first series. The original 44 mm watch has no screw down crowns while the time setting crown on the 40 mm is a screw down crown. I have never seen the inner bezel budge, but then I have rarely used that feature. For diving I use my Seiko Tunas, I bought the 1970 for its looks and it can serve as a dress watch.
 

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@nbardach: wouldn't wearing it on the right hand make it rub on the upper section of the arm?

Thanks for the support!
Actually, no. When your left hand is fully extended up towards your arm, crowns on the right side of your watch touch the back of your hand. But if the watch is on your right wrist, full extension doesn't press the crowns on the right side of your watch into your forearm. Image added for clarity on flexion vs extension of the hand.
15648555
 

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As consumers, I'd like to think most of us can recognize marketing fluff for what it is... marketing fluff. Is Dan Henry's marketing copy completely honest and above board? Probably not. However, I'd venture to guess that most educated consumers will take "made for hardcore divers" with a generous pinch of salt. Look at the watch in context. DH is closer to a fashion brand than a brand like Marathon. They make watches that look like period references that are purchased and worn for a little bit of fun rather than as mission timers for special operations or anything similarly hardcore.

I bet Dan Henry himself would agree with this assessment.
I have to agree. DH's are more a nod to the past than anything Jacques Cousteau or Sterling Moss would wear.

But at least my 1962 fashion watch will time my runs up to 500mph with quartz precision!
 

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But least my 1962 fashion watch will time my runs up to 500mph!
That's exactly why the situation is so funny (sorry, OP... but it looks like you are not making a tragic story out of it either).

It's not just timing your speed with a simple tachymeter ring - it's a whole magic of timing exact periods of time beneath all of it. Well... you (i.e. DH, but it looks like many others too) proudly claim that YOU can do THAT... but at the same time you can't prevent the bezel from random motion. It's so hilarious. If there is a heaven for watchmakers, I bet that Breguet, Harrison, Huygens and many others are laughing out loud as we speak.
 

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Is the watch an ISO compliant Dive/Diver/Divers/Diver's watch? If not then it's a divers-like or, if you will, a diver-ish watch, not subject to ISO compliance and thus not a dive watch.
I do agree with this. I don’t own a DH, and have no plans to get one, but I do really like the look of some models. But I would never get one with the expectation that it would provide full diving watch functionality the way an ISO certified watch would, regardless of their claims.
 

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There's a saying... you get what you paid for but that customer service leaves much to be desired... I would not be happy paying for anything that had that issue.
 

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Is the watch an ISO compliant Dive/Diver/Divers/Diver's watch? If not then it's a divers-like or, if you will, a diver-ish watch, not subject to ISO compliance and thus not a dive watch.
A dive watch is not defined by ISO certification. There is no standards body that decides what is and is not a dive watch.
 

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For everyone claiming that this watch is defective because it is not designed for diving, keep in mind that no problems have been described in this thread related to diving. No one has even mentioned taking the watch swimming or in water at all. No failure has been described during diving or in water.

One of the features of the compressor is that the pressure of the water helps to create a tighter seal, so it is likely the secondary crown is actually stiffer and less likely to move when under pressure in water at depth. If you are not in any depth of water, then there is no reason to rotate the inner bezel unless you are timing something unrelated to diving.

So, before you declare the watch unsuitable for diving, you should at least test it while diving to demonstrate that the same problem occurs. The underwater environment is different than your house and the crown may react differently.

If you think the watch is unsuitable for reliable pasta timing and parking meter tickets, then you may have purchased the wrong watch, but Dan Henry can hardly be blamed for it.
 

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Granted, Dan Henry does make nice looking stylized watches, which gives his buyers the opportunity to own a iconic vintage looking watch at an affordable price. And, the Dan Henry 1970 is no different for it is a compressor-style diver automatic and sells just below $300 USD.

I guess what I am getting at is that Dan Henry watches are for stylized wear and should not be seen as hardy tool watches. As such, you really should not expect Dan Henry watches to have the same longevity as watches that are five or ten times both in quality and price.
 

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For everyone claiming that this watch is defective because it is not designed for diving, keep in mind that no problems have been described in this thread related to diving. No one has even mentioned taking the watch swimming or in water at all. No failure has been described during diving or in water.

One of the features of the compressor is that the pressure of the water helps to create a tighter seal, so it is likely the secondary crown is actually stiffer and less likely to move when under pressure in water at depth. If you are not in any depth of water, then there is no reason to rotate the inner bezel unless you are timing something unrelated to diving.

So, before you declare the watch unsuitable for diving, you should at least test it while diving to demonstrate that the same problem occurs. The underwater environment is different than your house and the crown may react differently.

If you think the watch is unsuitable for reliable pasta timing and parking meter tickets, then you may have purchased the wrong watch, but Dan Henry can hardly be blamed for it.
The fatal flaw in your argument or theory is that the watch being discussed uses a compressor case. It doesn't. The DH 1970 employs a conventional design to keep out water. Again, it‘s an inexpensive watch designed to look like a period reference.

AFAIK, the only true compressor currently in production is made by C. Ward.
 

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As I understand it the compressor watch is more about the sealing of the case rather than the watch penetrations for the crowns. The Dan Henry 1970 is a compressor style watch, the attribute being copied being the two crowns and revolving inner bezel, not the pressure resistant engineering of the case. There are others such as the CCCP “Black Sea” that follow the same style, I bought one of those out of curiosity, but the Dan Henry is a better looker in my view.
CCCP-Russian-Automatic-Watches-CP-7043-01__28038.1542760414.jpg
 

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Since he said it would fix itself and it did not I would suggest sending it back.

His excuse did nothing but potentially run out your warranty.

Since he was wrong he should take responsibility and fix or replace it.
 

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As others have said, Dan Henry watches are essentially stylized watches. They really are nice fashion watches. I have owned two myself and really appreciated them for what they are.

As for the rotating inner bezel, I had that same issue when I owned an Alpinist. The thing never stayed put. As others have said, it is likely you are bumping the crown and moving it.

It sounds like it is within spec according to Dan Henry. At this point if I were you, I would move on. You are not satisfied (totally within reason). If they give you the refund, that’s great. If not, put it up for sale and put the funds toward something else.
 

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The fatal flaw in your argument or theory is that the watch being discussed uses a compressor case. It doesn't. The DH 1970 employs a conventional design to keep out water. Again, it‘s an inexpensive watch designed to look like a period reference.

AFAIK, the only true compressor currently in production is made by C. Ward.
So you have dived with the DH 1970 and you know how the crown operates in water? Would you say, in your personal experience diving with the DH 1970, that the water pressure makes some difference in the stiffness of the crown, or no difference at all? Please share your experiences, because they would help to prove or disprove my conjecture. I have not dived with the DH 1970, and I do not own one, nor have I taken the watch apart and studied its design, so I am just speculating. But you seem so sure that you must have personal experience with this watch? You must have taken it apart to know that underwater pressure is incapable of exerting any pressure on the crown assembly?
 
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