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ISO is a standard for dive watches. It is not a definition of what a dive watch is.
6425 is a standard that defines the characteristics of a dive watch and qualification requirements. Yes, it provides a definition for what a dive watch is. There are other standards.
 

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So you have dived with the DH 1970 and you know how the crown operates in water? Would you say, in your personal experience diving with the DH 1970, that the water pressure makes some difference in the stiffness of the crown, or no difference at all? Please share your experiences, because they would help to prove or disprove my conjecture. I have not dived with the DH 1970, and I do not own one, nor have I taken the watch apart and studied its design, so I am just speculating. But you seem so sure that you must have personal experience with this watch? You must have taken it apart to know that underwater pressure is incapable of exerting any pressure on the crown assembly?
Nice job with the stealth change of direction when the flaw in your argument is pointed out. I appreciate your intellectual (dis)honesty.

I'll quote you:

"One of the features of the compressor is that the pressure of the water helps to create a tighter seal, so it is likely the secondary crown is actually stiffer and less likely to move when under pressure in water at depth. If you are not in any depth of water, then there is no reason to rotate the inner bezel unless you are timing something unrelated to diving."

Again, the DH IS NOT A COMPRESSOR CASE. Your argument is predicated on this flawed assumption. If you'd care to restate the argument without the flaw, perhaps I'll respond. Otherwise, take this as a personal invitation to go pound sand.
 
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It kinda is. But go ahead and elucidate what exactly a dive watch is and how it is unrelated to ISO 6425
To be fair, the Rolex Submariner - the iconic dive watch - is not ISO 6425 tested.
 

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To be fair, the Rolex Submariner - the iconic dive watch - is not ISO 6425 tested.
I know that, but it also does not say diver/diver's etc as US FTC requires watches to be ISO 6425 compliant in order to be labeled dive/diver etc (there may be some others besides rolex, but I don't think DH is one of them)

Edit - my understanding is rolex's standards are more stringent than ISO's
 

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As many other posts and members have pointed out, 99.999999% of people who get in the water will never go deeper than 10m, never mind 50 or 100m.

You probably have a better chance of being struck by lightning on the day you win the Mega Millions Lotto than of ever meeting someone who has gone down to 200m.
 

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I know that, but it also does not say diver/diver's etc as US FTC requires watches to be ISO 6425 compliant in order to be labeled dive/diver etc (there may be some others besides rolex, but I don't think DH is one of them)

Edit - my understanding is rolex's standards are more stringent than ISO's
I agree on all points. Just noting that the ISO standard is not the be all/end all. In fact, I've read that Seikos use a Japanese standard that's not quite the same as ISO for "Divers" rated watches, although I may be wrong. This hobby is so jam packed with misinformation and disinformation that it's often tough to be sure.
 
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I just googled the watch since I no nothing about it. Looks like its a supercompressor. So the bezel is inside the case. So the only way it's the OP's fault the bezel doesn't say in place (assuming OP didn't damage the watch) is if the bezel crown wasn't locked. If it was, then it's likely a lemon. In that case, I would expect the manufacturer to take it back and assess whether or not they gave a paying customer a bad watch or if it was the fault of the customer. Looking at their website however it seems like their return policy is if you touched it, we won't take it back. So a return is out of the question. But service under warranty should be.

I don't know the story on the other side, or how many times the OP might've emailed the company (and thus the rather blunt return), but I will say that this at the very minimum doesn't help the brand. Sounds like it would make sense to send it back under warranty and just clear it up.
 

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I just googled the watch since I no nothing about it. Looks like its a supercompressor. So the bezel is inside the case. So the only way it's the OP's fault the bezel doesn't say in place (assuming OP didn't damage the watch) is if the bezel crown wasn't locked. If it was, then it's likely a lemon. In that case, I would expect the manufacturer to take it back and assess whether or not they gave a paying customer a bad watch or if it was the fault of the customer. Looking at their website however it seems like their return policy is if you touched it, we won't take it back. So a return is out of the question. But service under warranty should be.

I don't know the story on the other side, or how many times the OP might've emailed the company (and thus the rather blunt return), but I will say that this at the very minimum doesn't help the brand. Sounds like it would make sense to send it back under warranty and just clear it up.
As with all classic supercompressors and many modern reinterpretations (including the new CW Supercompressor), the second crown does not screw down or otherwise lock. If worn low and loose on the wrist, the back of the hand can rub against and turn the bezel crown.
 

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I just googled the watch since I no nothing about it. Looks like its a supercompressor. So the bezel is inside the case. So the only way it's the OP's fault the bezel doesn't say in place (assuming OP didn't damage the watch) is if the bezel crown wasn't locked. If it was, then it's likely a lemon. In that case, I would expect the manufacturer to take it back and assess whether or not they gave a paying customer a bad watch or if it was the fault of the customer. Looking at their website however it seems like their return policy is if you touched it, we won't take it back. So a return is out of the question. But service under warranty should be.

I don't know the story on the other side, or how many times the OP might've emailed the company (and thus the rather blunt return), but I will say that this at the very minimum doesn't help the brand. Sounds like it would make sense to send it back under warranty and just clear it up.
Based on my understanding, the "supercompressor" designation has nothing to do with bezel location. You'll see some with traditional external bezels and even some supercompressor watches with no rotating dive-time bezel at all.

Few if any true supercompressor dive watches had a bezel that "locked" as you put it. The vast majority were bidirectional and free-spinning, as we see with the DH and most modern watches that ape the look if not the case functionality.
 

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As with all classic supercompressors and many modern reinterpretations (including the new CW Supercompressor), the second crown does not screw down or otherwise lock. If worn low and loose on the wrist, the back of the hand can rub against and turn the bezel crown.
Cut and pasted from 1970

CASE
40mm stainless steel 316L
14.8mm thickness
22mm lug width
45.7mm lug to lug
Screw down crown
2 o’clock crown operates the inner rotating bezel while the 4 o’clock crown adjusts time
Screw-back case with Scaphtopus 3D medal



I guess they did say crown singular and it is up to you to guess which of the crowns plural is screw down. Though actually they did say which one is the screw down as they show a picture of the screw down 4 o'clock but not the 2 o'clock. I'll be honest I was kind of on the fence over the OP vs DH argument. I just figured OP got a lemon, which happens to every company. Says nothing bad about DH, and I've even tried to explain away the blunt response to the OP. But I am leaning more against DH after responding to this post and looking at the website some more.

My Longines supercompressor with an internal bezel has a screw down main and bezel crown. Which would make sense in a dive watch where you want water resistance and avoid accidental bezel movement. Especially a dive watch for "hardcore divers" (quote from DH site).






Based on my understanding, the "supercompressor" designation has nothing to do with bezel location.
True. That was my mistake. I should've mentioned "with an internal bezel." I'll be honest, I'm not a dive watch person at all. That said, my experience with supercompressors with internal bezels are that they do lock the bezel. Granted, my experience is mainly with Longines and JLC, so I don't know if at lower prices they don't lock. But you can see my above response with regards to my thoughts about what is on the site and the non-locking bezel.
 
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I skipped on the original 44mm orange and the original 44mm grey because they were too big for me. Then the reduced case models dropped and I completely missed out because I was headed in a different direction at the time. Now, it seems like one might post to the sales forum soon!
 

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Had the same issue as OP with the DH1970. The 2 o’clock crown does rotate when it comes in contact with the back of your hands.

The Seiko SARB017 also has a finicky inner bezel but to a lesser degree because the 4 o’clock crown is shorter.

Long story short, wearing it behind the wrist bone addressed the accidental rotating of the inner bezel. Took a while to get accustomed to but now wear all my watches on or behind the wrist bone.
 

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Dan Henry 1970 Diver automatic instructions
By Dan Henry

Your Dan Henry is powered by the Seiko NH35, an automatic movement that is often referred to as “self-winding”. Automatic movements harness energy through the natural motion of your wrist. No battery is necessary.
If worn every day, your 1970 diver will not need winding. If the watch is not worn for several days, wind it for initial power (see Crown Positions).
The crown functions in three positions:
1. Unscrewed (wind the movement)

  • To wind, rotate the crown clockwise. (If the watch has stopped because the automatic movement has run out of power, wind about 50 rotations if you have not used the unit for a while).
2. Partially pulled out (change the date)
  • To advance the date, turn the crown counter-clockwise. (Do not adjust the date between 9pm–3am, while the date gears are in motion to change the date)
3. Fully pulled out (adjust the time)
  • The seconds will stop. Rotate the hands to set the time. (We recommend you only turn the hands clockwise for the long-term health of the movement).
Inner bezel diving timer
Your Dan Henry 1970 is a diver watch is equipped with two crowns, the upper crown rotates the inner bezel, originally was used for professional divers to measure their diving time.
Water resistance
Your Dan Henry 1970 is a real diver's watch, tested under three different conditions to resist water to a deep scuba dive depth of 200 meters.
To ensure water resistance, the crown must be turned to the fully closed position. Do not operate either crown while under water.
Screw-down crown (only for the 40mm case version)
  • The lower crown sets the time and date. This crown screws down to improve water resistance and protect the movement.
  • To open the crown, turn it counterclockwise until it is no longer threaded.
  • To secure the crown after adjusting the time or date, gently push in the crown to align the screw threads; then turn clockwise.
 

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Discussion Starter #76
For everyone claiming that this watch is defective because it is not designed for diving, keep in mind that no problems have been described in this thread related to diving. No one has even mentioned taking the watch swimming or in water at all. No failure has been described during diving or in water.
Even though it might go against my case, I wanted to highlight this: I'm not complaining that I will risk my life diving with this watch, because I'm not that big of an idiot and I knew before buying it that there are diver watches and "diver watches".
But I hope you'll (all) agree that one thing is not being able to rely on it to dive the deepest of the oceans, another thing is having a feature that is exclusively aesthetic.
I also not agree with those that blame not me directly but the way I wear it: we're talking about a wrist watch, not a wrist-but-behind-the-bone watch. In my opinion, as long as it is on the wrist, I should be able to wear the way I like it AND benefit of all the features I paid for.

I don't know the story on the other side, or how many times the OP might've emailed the company (and thus the rather blunt return), but I will say that this at the very minimum doesn't help the brand. Sounds like it would make sense to send it back under warranty and just clear it up.
I emailed DH twice: one 2 months after buying the watch and the other one yesterday.

First answer:
Hi pedro1991,

they are all quite loose and they trend to became harder with the time.

Sincerely,
Dan
Second answer:
Hi pedro1991,

they are all the same and we can not do anything about it...

Sincerely,
Dan
Maybe I had unrealistic expectations or I felt entitled, but I hoped to receive a tad more than 2 one-liners; I've been bounced by mean girls with longer texts and, according to the mails, that would be Dan himself answering to his customers..
 

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My dive watches are rotating outer bezel types and my only experience with supercompressor style dive watch is the Maurice Lacroix Pontos which indeed has a screw down second crown for the inner rotating bezel.

As a diver myself, I suggest the Dan Henry 1970 isn't really designed to be safely used for timing a dive due to the susceptibility of the inner bezel to rotate unintentionally while the watch is worn normally. It may well be suitable to be taken down to depth (as are other watches including the SARB017 that do not necessarily proclaim themselves to be 'dive watches' per se) but that's another matter.

In any case, I wouldn't rely on it as the sole indicator or even back-up indicator of my dive bottom time and certainly wouldn't describe it as a 'professional diver's' watch.
 

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It kinda is. But go ahead and elucidate what exactly a dive watch is and how it is unrelated to ISO 6425
I think you know what a dive watch is.

I don't think you are clear on what ISO standards are for. ISO certification indicates a dive watch has met specific standards, which may change from time to time, and has passed an audit from an accredited body. It does in itself define what a dive watch is or is not. This is defined in common language and by usage, the same way we know what an "aircraft carrier" is without having to rely on a specific technical definition. ISO defines what an ISO certified watch is, which is useful in itself, but does not change the base definition of what a dive watch is.

Note that a dive watch can meet or exceed all ISO standards without being ISO certified if it does not apply for certification. There may well be competing standards which are equally rigorous and useful as indications of quality and performance, but not based on ISO. Or, a company can purchase the ISO certification document and use it as a base standard, but not apply for certification. Or, since the requirements for diving are well known, a company can just design a watch based on common knowledge of what is required for a watch while diving.
 

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So you have dived with the DH 1970 and you know how the crown operates in water? Would you say, in your personal experience diving with the DH 1970, that the water pressure makes some difference in the stiffness of the crown, or no difference at all? Please share your experiences, because they would help to prove or disprove my conjecture. I have not dived with the DH 1970, and I do not own one, nor have I taken the watch apart and studied its design, so I am just speculating. But you seem so sure that you must have personal experience with this watch? You must have taken it apart to know that underwater pressure is incapable of exerting any pressure on the crown assembly?
You certainly are a confrontational WUS poster.
 
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I wonder whether this one will perform better as the "internal" bezel is actually a ring with an arrow, kept between the dial and the chapter ring (more friction?) and the bezel crown is screwed down: Gavox Avidiver
15650024

$650+ is pricey for a Miyota 9015 movement as it's pricier than watches with even ETA 2824 and its successor powermatic 80.
I guess the inner rotation assembly is sort of premium which explains the controversial style...
 
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