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I assume it takes a solar cell to detect that there's no light.

Manually switching off time display on a non-solar model probably doesn't save much power.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Manually switching off time display on a non-solar model probably doesn't save much power.
Why not?

Situation is: I have a 10 year 7100 for 3rd world travel and surfing/climbing weekends on the basis it cost so little I don't mind scratches/theft/loss. So I use it for 1/6th of the year. If I could switch it right off for the other 5/6 that makes it a 30 year watch assuming a saving of 50% by turning off the display. Worth having I would have thought.
 

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Well, I have a quartz analogue watch with a battery that lasts ten years. If providing mechanical power doesn't take much juice, a digital display can't take much either. The power drains in a digital watch, as I understand it, are chimes, alarms, and use of the backlight (and atomic time-keeping if present). If these are turned off, the life of the battery can exceed the period stated by Casio in the manual. The gaskets would need to be replaced several times in a thirty year period, so a longer-lasting battery wouldn't make the watch maintenance-free. With the cost of batteries being fairly low, the savings could probably be counted in pennies.
 

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I think it could be achieved using a photoelectric sensor, but I agree with tribe that the benefits would be negligible, especially as you'd be paying for the extra technology (which also might take up space on the display). Apparently it's important not to let solar batteries drain, so it's more useful on solar watches that might be stored for long periods without light, as their storage capacity is significantly shorter than a standard batteries life.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Its not the saving of money that is the important factor but the avoidance of boringly trivial tasks. I have just changed my Land Rover for a small diesel car which does 600 miles to a tank rather than 240. The financial saving is great but not as good as the reduction of time spent taking and paying for fuel. Same with changing watch batteries. As for gaskets I would think appropriate storage conditions would extend their life. My approach would be to run the watch till battery or gasket went, then bin it.
 

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Why not?

Situation is: I have a 10 year 7100 for 3rd world travel and surfing/climbing weekends on the basis it cost so little I don't mind scratches/theft/loss. So I use it for 1/6th of the year. If I could switch it right off for the other 5/6 that makes it a 30 year watch assuming a saving of 50% by turning off the display. Worth having I would have thought.
The lithium battery would deplete on it's own within 15-20 years anyway, even outside the watch.
 

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My approach would be to run the watch till battery or gasket went, then bin it.
How about run it till battery or gasket go, then mail it to me and I'll pay the postage? ;-)
 

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Going a little off topic, but the Seiko auto relay kinetics (analogs) have a power save, where the hands stop moving but the inner circuits keep track of time.
 
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