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I don't have the biggest wrists at 6.75" so I am very conservative with case dimensions when choosing watches but when I purchased (all of my watch purchases are online) my Casio WS200H (43.5mm) I thought, "hey this is kind of small"

Thinking that I could get away with larger watches, I picked up a Wenger Alpine Diver 42mm but dang it wears large and I felt like 'little boy wearing daddy's watch!'

My G-Shock GW-5600J (5600 series) is considered the smallest of the G-shocks (I think) but is still 43mm wide and I feel that the Gulfman at 46mm suits me just fine!

So the big question: Do digitals really wear smaller than analogs or am I just imagining things?
 

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them G-shocks have huge bezels and small dials, so they naturally wear alot smaller. I have a 36mm ecodrive that is literally all dial and no bezel, and it wears bigger than my 42mm diver.
 

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The other thing to consider is that G-shocks are a lot lighter than stainless steel watches (where even the movements weigh more) and that can subconciously make a difference.
 

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I think the square shape of the 5600 in particular has something to do with it. You have a relatively large case diameter, but becuase it isn't round, lug to lug length is actually quite short compared to a traditional analog. So, the measurement is really apples to oranges there because it doesn't imply the same thing about the watch's size. I think another thing that makes a lot of digitals seem a little smaller is the integrated strap, or more specifically, the lack of lugs. All that area of lugs and endlinks on a traditional syle watch have visual weight, and on some watches they have an awful lot of visual weight. They also don't bend like an integrated strap, so they don't conform to the wrist and probably go a long way to make the watch seem larger. A lot of folks even tend to think that a watch lug which sticks out off the wrist is a good indicator of a watch that is "too large". Not going to happen on digitals.

Even so, I do think that for whatever reason it does seem like we allow digitals to be larger. Maybe it's that we have an idea about how large an analog watch should be based on tradition, and anything larger seems out of place or odd. I don't know if digitals have that same sort of familiarity, especially since their shapes tend to be more variable. Or, maybe it's just a style thing and we like larger digitals. Hard to say.
 

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All the comments above are true, and furthermore, in my experience most quartz watches are thinner and lighter than mechanical. Thickness and weight have a huge effect on my sense of watch size. I'm pretty average at a 7" wrist, but I struggle with some 42mm watches because they're so lunky. I think you find so many WIS buying and flipping watches because we find that the published specifications don't tell the whole story, and over time we come to find favorites by trying them for a while. There is no simple equation to solve that.
 
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