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I've got a 25 year old g-shock that I'm guessing will outlast the next ice age. Everything else is gravy.
My G shock was bought in 1986, I refurbed it, looks almost NOS...keeps on runnin


15871883
 

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I have a mix of affordable and vintage, with some obscure movements. I have a Landeron 4750 and an Accutron 218 in need of service. There are maybe three watchmakers who can do the 4750 and a handful for the Accutron. I gave up on a Ruhla 26.

I find myself really liking the idea of low maintenance quartz watches now.
 

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Depends what forever means. When wife says forever, I'm frightened, on the other hand I'm sure I'm going to need lots of capacitors in a decade for all my solar watches.

I hope people realize all those sexy solar watches have a limited time capacitor/battery.
 

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Never crossed my mind I’m afraid.

Do I like it....can I afford it.....buy it.
 

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100% yes. You could say that the question: "which watches last you a lifetime?" is what got me into the watch hobby.

As a teenager my parents gave me my first real watch. It was a Seiko panda dial chronograph with the 7T32 quartz movement. Not a very expensive watch by this forum's standard, but at the time the most expensive gift I had ever received and it represented a real cost to my parents. I wore that watch every day of my life until my late 20's, when something was wrong with the movement. I took it to a watch maker who told me the movement could not be repaired but another one could be sourced and used for this watch. And that I should not be too upset because "all these watches stop working after a few decades". He went on to talk about different movements and what you can reasonably expect from them.

I was surprised and interested. Watches that can not be fixed? Electromigration and circuitry with a limited lifespan? I thought I could wear my watch my entire life. So I asked him the question that led me deeper down the rabbit hole: "which watches could last you a lifetime?". His response was fairly elaborate and I can not remember all of it, but somewhere in it he mentioned mechanical movements and how he was able to service them. He showed me a movement as an example and explained that the movement I was looking at had been "ticking since the 60's and will for decades more" (or something like that). I was fascinated and hooked.

So for me the durability and possibility to service a watch has always been an important draw. It is what got me into watches. In addition the idea of a watch running without needing a battery but just making use of the energy you provide it with your own movement was something that was part of what got me hooked. People call it outdated technology. But in that moment, looking at the movement the watchmaker showed me, it seemed so much more elegant and clever than a movement that needed circuitry and a battery to run. (nothing against quartz or saying they are as a rule not durable. These were just my thoughts at the time and what got me interested in watches)
 

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30 years from now the only thing you'll be wondering when you look down at a boxful of 30-year-old watches is "what did I miss," and "where did the time go?" That could extend to other areas of your life. It's a big world. Explore.
 

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Yes. Knowing that a watch could last decades is definitely a factor when purchasing. But wouldn't it cost more to service a $100-$300 watch then just replacing?
 

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That's not a factor I consider but I do avoid brands that I had repeated problems with in the past. I had two Wengers that failed prematurely so I won't by another..

So far I've had one quartz watch that lasted over 30 years (a Seiko) and two others I bought sometime in the 1990s that are still running fine. Not sure of the exact year I purchased them so I don't know their precise age. One of those is a Victorinox and the other is an Invicta.

I also have a several pre-owned Timex watches from the 70s that still run and keep reasonable time. I don't know if they were ever serviced.
 

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When I buy a watch, of course I look at build quality and how much I would enjoy wearing it. I also think of how long it will last and whether I would want to pass it along when I am done with it.

That said, I keep this advice in mind:

“You see this goblet?” asks Achaan Chaa, the Thai meditation master. “For me this glass is already broken. I enjoy it; I drink out of it. It holds my water admirably, sometimes even reflecting the sun in beautiful patterns. If I should tap it, it has a lovely ring to it. But when I put this glass on the shelf and the wind knocks it over or my elbow brushes it off the table and it falls to the ground and shatters, I say, ‘Of course.’ When I understand that the glass is already broken, every moment with it is precious."
 

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I’ve already got watches that are “beyond repair” and I fully expected them only to have a short life when they were brought into the collection but I realised this when I gave the old warhorses a home. The potential longevity of a watch never enters my head.
 

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Nothing lasts forever, so no, it's not a consideration for me. On the other hand, a well built modern watch will likely run for decades if taken care of. So, I guess, it's kind of built in in my mind.

I find the obsession with longevity among WIS odd and interesting. Often couched in the desire to leave a part of themselves behind for future generations to admire and venerate.

My preference is to enjoy my little time telling machines for what they bring to my life in the here and now. Will the same pieces continue to delight and inspire 10 or 20 years from now? Can't say, though it's likely a few will and a few won't.

To me, that's the beauty of affordable (< $300) watches; variety and quality to be enjoyed in the moment.

OP:
You may be missing out on some great watches due to your fixation on "forever". Orient makes one heck of a watch, just sayin'.

Plated watches, as part of a larger collection as opposed to an every day wear, will look nice for a looooong time. In my experience fears of wearing through the plating/finish are highly overblown.
 

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LOL. I am a serial flipper, and amongst my collection of 30 watches, the one I have owned the longest I have had about three years. So the answer to the OP's question is no.
 
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Forever? Eventually everything around you will revert back to stardust after being sucked into the sun...except G-shocks. I suspect in a couple billion years there will be a battle of galactic proportions between Solar G-Shocks and the sun

But yes, I do consider it. It's also why I moved primarily to replaceable on the cheaper end (NH35, Miyota etc), and serviceable on the higher end (ubiquitous ETA etc).
I hope to have many decades left in me, and don't like the idea of buying a watch just to be disposed in a few years.
 

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I never really thought of it that way.
I only buy watches that I think I'll want to wear for the rest of my life. So, I guess I expect them to run at least untill I'm not around anymore. I'm about half way there, by statistics, so I think most serviceable mechanical watches would do the job just fine for 40 years or so.
What happens after that is none of my concern.
 

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Another no for me. I buy and sell frequently. I do however avoid really expensive watches with movements that aren’t ubiquitous, overly complicated, or have to be sent to another country for service. The servicing costs and hassle are far too great for me personally. Some find ETA and the ever popular Seiko NH movements boring. I had a problem with a used Seiko I purchased a few years back. I bought a new movement for $32 and had fun switching it out myself. Problem solved cheaply and quickly. Not gonna lie though, the first time replacing hands for me was challenging but fun.
 

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I loathe the disposable type of society that is prevalent these days. I wouldn't consider a watch that I didn't think could feasibly last me the rest of my life. That's why I buy the highest quality clothes i can reasonably afford and buy goodyear welted footwear
 

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I try not to stress about it. Life is short and chances are nothing will happen to the watch, or I’ll find a replacement anyways.


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