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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've never been to an AD myself(not enough $$$), but I think if I were to, I'd probably dress up to get more respect. Maybe even comb my hair.

I certainly wouldn't just wear shorts, a t-shirt, with a G-Shock on the wrist.

Let's hear some real life stories about dress vs respect/service. :-!

EDIT: Feels like I am talking about going to church! Although to a WIS, this isn't too far from the truth!
 

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you could be right....I walked into an AD in Pasadena wearing cargo shorts & a Hawaiian shirt, sales help was curt.............came back 2 weeks later in dress shirt & trousers.......much better service.......as an asides 1st time...wearing a Rolex, 2nd time....a Panerai.
 

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No. Never, really. I don't walk around like a slob normally, and I won't dress up to impress a retailer who'll be benefiting from my potential purchase.

My general position is that if a person won't treat me with respect based on my normal, everyday, 'dressed for work or the weekend' appearance, then they don't deserve my money.
 

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I enjoy good clothes so dressing up is no more of more a problem than dressing down.

However, regardless of how you're dressed, a good AD sizes up how you shop by seeing the brands you're interested in and by listening to the first few questions you ask. Good AD sales representatives are careful not to dismiss a potential customer based only on appearances.
 

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from many personal experience

AD and expensive watch store,
they dont really care much bout the clothes

but they care about the watch I wear

I dont get served at all if I wear casio or seiko
but I get served like a king when I wear Chopard or Rolex ..

when I plan to go to fancy AD
I wear my Rolex, just to get their attention that no matter how poor my look, I could afford their stuff

if not, I just seeing here and there, with all the sales person just standing n look at me, not even interested to open up the watch or answer my questions..

its a luxury bussiness nowadays..
what you wear to the store, define you
 

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Never. I wear whatever I happen to have on. I find the ruder type of AD to be the ones in malls since people probably wander in all day long and ******** them to try on a Rolex. Stand alone stores know that you specifically go there because youre serious.

Ive never been treated badly, but there have been one or two times in mall dealers that left something to be desired.
 

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I think most places the only thing they look at is what watch you have on. I have gone in jeans and T-shirt and been treated just as well.

I have been to a few Rolex ADs and they did not openly ask, or were not obvious about seeing what watch I was wearing either, we just talked about Rolex. None of these times I was shopping for watches, so I did not dress up.

If I am going to specifically shop for a watch I like to wear an interesting watch (does not have to be expensive), and clothes that I would wear with the type of watch I am buying.
 
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I certainly wouldn't just wear shorts, a t-shirt, with a G-Shock on the wrist.
Why not? My credit cards have the same limit no matter what I wear.

Shorts and Tshirt weed out the poor AD's from the ones that want to do business.
 

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My attire depends on my strategic objectives for the visit. If I want to see a watch and I wish to handle it and interact with the sales staff, I dress up so I don't have to wait for service. If I just want to look at the watches in their cases, I dress down so people leave me alone.
I've walked into ADs in shorts before, waited forever to see a watch and when the sales lady finally took the watch out the first thing she told me was the price. I've walked into ADs in my business dress and have been treated like royalty. I don't care. It all depends on how much help I want and how quickly I want it.
 

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Have bought both my Bs wearing trainers, tracksuit bottoms and t-shirt!!
 

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Why not? My credit cards have the same limit no matter what I wear.

Shorts and Tshirt weed out the poor AD's from the ones that want to do business.
+1 on both statements. I wear dress clothes to work, so I revel in wearing ripped/shredded jeans and faded shirts on days off when I have nothing important to do. The ADs I go to never have treated me differently regardless of what I'm wearing. I actually prefer salespeople to let me be until I need them, maybe checking on me every few minutes just in case I have any questions but not hovering like a vulture.
 

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On the weekends, when I have time to visit ADs, I typically dress down. I agree with the sentiment that how someone treats you when they think you are not able to purchase their product is more indicitive of the longer term service you will get from them. On that note, only the mid-level mall folks have ever been rude/disrespectful to me; I visited a IWC/JLC/A. Lange AD dressed extremely casually and they treated me extremely well. Even when I mentioned that the Lange was well out of my range, he insisted I try it on and look at it because he knew I loved watches. That is service.
 

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My attire depends on my strategic objectives for the visit. If I want to see a watch and I wish to handle it and interact with the sales staff, I dress up so I don't have to wait for service. If I just want to look at the watches in their cases, I dress down so people leave me alone.
I've walked into ADs in shorts before, waited forever to see a watch and when the sales lady finally took the watch out the first thing she told me was the price. I've walked into ADs in my business dress and have been treated like royalty. I don't care. It all depends on how much help I want and how quickly I want it.
:-! can not agree more

its just a strategy, since many watch brand (AD) is a luxury product

no matter , the store is in the shopping mall, or a specialized watch store..

if I want to get treated decently, allow me to analize and try on the watch I am interested in

dressing up and wearing comparable watch (to the AD price range) is obligatory.. or else, those AD just watching you in,
making the face, what on earth is this poor fellow doing in such boutique ??

when I insisted to see a watch, they say the price first to see my reaction...

this is a conversation happens to me last month

me : can I see that watch over there ...

sales : sir, it arround 100 millions watch / 10.000 usd... (and staring at me funnily, while keep watching my seiko)..
he really hesitate that I really understand that the watch is not a Seiko ... its 10.000 usd watch

me : only 100 millions ? can I still see it, trust me sir, I can easily afford it

sales : didnt know what to say to this poor fellow look person, and not very eagerly, taking out the 100 millions watch (AP classic royal oak)

it happens to me +/- 1 months ago, when I just got to try the AP Royal Oak ( its KiwiDJ faults... hahahah)

but I forget to dress up and wear my Rolex...
I just came from work wearing non branded T shirt and jeans, wearing my Sumo... (its a Seiko)

it happens
all the times

so every time me want to treated like a good customer,
wear like those AD hopes you to wear
then you are treated very specially and get to know the good watch rather than just staring at it at front of the fancy AD
 

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Hmm... I rarely wear shorts and flip-flops, though I think even if I came in AD in swimming suit but having an idea what I want to see or hear - they will serve me.
If you know the watch you want to look at and tell the guy brand and model, showing that you have an idea about price... There should be no bad attitude.
 

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No. Never, really. I don't walk around like a slob normally, and I won't dress up to impress a retailer who'll be benefiting from my potential purchase.

My general position is that if a person won't treat me with respect based on my normal, everyday, 'dressed for work or the weekend' appearance, then they don't deserve my money.
+1 - I've had very few positive experiences in ADs. Its amazing to me. I learned on my first job that what someone is wearing has NOTHING to do with their real wealth. Had an old guy come in wearing overalls and old boots. Someone else helped him as I was too good to do so. He paid cash and bought some of the most expensive items in the place. Manager had a chat with me and explained that all money is green. Never made that mistake again. Too bad so many sales people don't get it.

I find all the statements that folks haven't been treated differently when they dress down fascinating. Here in Atlanta I have never received good service when I am in non-business attire. Tourneau in Atlanta has a horrible reputation among the WIS I have chatted with on the topic for being incredibly stupid in this regard. The only time I EVER got the time of day from anyone at Tourneau was when I went in wearing a suit (which I almost never do) and my then Rolex. Every other time (which has only been a few because of this behavior) I've been ignored in favor or folks that know how to dress. Tells me reams about their approach and how I'll be treated post-sale frankly.
 

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Although we could go on and on about why it shouldn't be important how you look, I have found that if you want good service and have little time, it is best to dress the part - whatever part you want to play.
 

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Although we could go on and on about why it shouldn't be important how you look, I have found that if you want good service and have little time, it is best to dress the part - whatever part you want to play.
Well I think we can agree that it is important how you look. But that extends to being clean, well groomed, neat, etc. If you walk into any higher end store dressed like slob, matted hair, shirt stained / untucked, ripped pants, etc. etc., you can, and should, expect to be ignored.

At the same time, I'm not going to dress up for a jewellry store. That shows deference. That shows respect. You're expected to dress appropriately for court, for a first date, for a job interview - yes. You dress to impress. I shouldn't be required to do that when I'm looking to spend my money (potentially thousands) on a product I don't need.
 

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Depends on the person you deal with. If you're approached by a more mature and experienced salesman, they'll be fast not to judge your disposable income based on your appearance as they'll have had enough big dollar sales from guys who look like they just got out of bed.

But if you get someone a bit younger and wet behind the ears, or if you basically get a snob who's really chuffed with his sales job in a retail store then you're in for some attitude.

I picked up my new BMW two weeks ago wearing a grey Nike sports sweater (actually says NIKE Track and Field on it in big letters!) and a old pair of blue Gap jeans. The service is incredible there, everyone you meet from the finance guy to your salesman if very down to earth and friendly. I've never had better service and was honestly the only guy in there dressed for a pub lunch! Loads of suits everywhere and not one guy or girl gave me the slightest bit of disrespect.

I don't dress up to go to dealers, but I will put myself out as someone who has value no matter what they're wearing, clothes just don't happen to be my passion, or something I'm into, I shouldn't be penalised for that - I probably have more expensive cars, computers, gadgets, hobbies than the majority of the guys who dress better than me when I'm in town, I mean that with absolutely no exaggeration intended. But I'm realistic, and I know that when I am dressed smarter, I do get more respect, superficial as it may be.. but I don't care enough for that. I'm happy bumming around in casual gear!
 

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I agree that AD sales people pay much more attention to your watch than your clothes.

But, if you don't have a "nice" watch yet, I think dressing up is a great tactic.

Sales people are going to give more attention to legitimate prospects. Right or wrong, many use the way you dress as a cue to how serious a buyer you are (It's easier than requesting to see your W-2). Though I wouldn't call it a common experience, I've definitely been treated differently based on my clothes/what's on my wrist. I don't take it personally - sales people are there to sell watches and put food on the table.

By dressing up you increase the odds of having a worthwhile experience - fast service, good dialog, and a maintained level of service as you try on the 11th watch.
 

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Seriously, I would never dress up before visiting an AD...no way...why should I? If I'm going to purchase a premium (or ANY) product I expect the sales people at the store to be professional enough to treat me the best way they can as a customer. If they don't manage to do that, I'll take my business elsewhere...

I've visited lots of AD's and my experience is that the more "premium" it is, the less they care about my clothing. It's like when you're visiting a exclusive car dealer or a really exclusive real estate broker...if they're any good they'll notice the difference between a possible buyer and a window shopper...

Just my 5 cents... :)

Cheers,

/edw
 
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