WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 20 of 53 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello!

I'm new to the forum, so far it looks like an amazing resource for all things watches and a great place for fun conversation.

Please excuse the provocative thread title, as I'm sure all of you for the most part actually use your watches! The question at hand is more or less, do you actually use your watch as it was perhaps intended to be used? Or have you given your watch's intended function a purpose whether it be using it for your own particular profession, sporting, hobbies, or even just everyday use?

I'm attempting to ask this question because I'm new to the watch scene... I own several everyday beater watches with none offering much practicality other then a Timex chronograph (works great!)... The problem is, it's just not that exciting... I don't love putting it on everyday. I'm ready to make a serious purchase and step up to the luxury tier, However, I actually want to wear and use the watch while I'm at work.

I work as a Paramedic and often can find myself in some pretty precarious situations (not so easy on watches). I mostly use my watch to measure time in a chronographic type setting, which is ideal for keeping track of time elapsed on scene, patching and reporting to off-site Doctors, referencing time for medication administration, taking pulses, even using an alarm function if I find myself able to take a nap on a quiet night shift.

The watch I'm eyeballing is the Omega Speedmaster Skywalker X-33 (roughly $6000)... Is it too much watch to be used on duty? Do any of you guys use a luxury type watch in a harsh or rough work environment? I would love to hear your thoughts and opinions!

Thanks,
D23
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
I wear beater on the job and nicer watches on my time off. I see no sense in wearing a nice watch in a situation were it could be damaged.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,843 Posts
I imagine a x-33 would withstand pretty much everything you can throw at it. Though I am not sure I would want such a watch to be bathed in various bodily fluids and possibly chemicals. I would go the beater route for job + nice watch for everything else, myself. But to each his own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Very respectable opinions, thank you very much.

I also imagine the Skywalker X-33 would handle pretty much anything I could throw at it. A few dings/dents/chips wouldn't bother me.

I am more or less struggling with the idea that not many people wear a luxury type watch while at work in a more harsh environment... Regardless of its functionality.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,874 Posts
It's not like it particularly looks very luxurious. If you can afford it, and will enjoy it as a daily wearer, I say go for it man. It's a quality piece that will last for years and years to come.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
463 Posts
Depending on the situations you find yourself in out in the field. an expensive watch could become a target rather than an asset.

And also, to be honest, in that type of job I would want something more water-resistant than 3 bar (30 metres - 100 feet). And keep in mind the servicing costs/price of a broken crystal etc., if you are going to use the thing hard. In a tricky situation do you want to be worrying about your watch or your patient?

Nothing fundamentally wrong with the idea of an expensive working watch but a cheap, lightweight beater (everyone shout "G-SHOCK"!), will be far more durable in service.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,102 Posts
I'm a physician and I wear a metal Timex Indiglo because it looks somewhat formal and I can cavi-wipe it all day and it'll survive. I have much nicer watches that I will not wear to work.
 
  • Like
Reactions: rdoder

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,993 Posts
In answer to your first question - yes, and for a variety of purposes for which they were intended.

In answer to your other question, I believe that would be an excellent choice for the following reasons (which you have already figured out)
Titanium construction - lightweight and corrosion resistant
Ceramic bezel - durable
(those two items will take care of those pesky body fluids - and the sterilizing agents to disinfect them.)
multiple functions - including elapsed time functions and countdown timers
multiple alarms
Outstanding visibility - you aren't always working at noon outside
Easy, big pushers - that WON'T snag things like the more common round style.
Perpetual Calender - no more remembering to set the date or worrying about writing the wrong date down (make the Lawyers work)
Thermocompensated movement - your times will be accurate. Very accurate.

Too much money for a watch to use this way?
Look at it like this:
1) How much is your ambulance worth? Would you want to work out of a Chrysler minivan stocked with a thermometer and Band Aids?
2) It's NOT - NOT - NOT a luxury item. It's a TOOL., An expensive one, yes. But a damn good one. Notice that professional mechanics use Snap On, not the Lowes brand.
3) It's your job man, the watch may someday make a difference.
4) In between scooping brains off the pavement and hauling an OD'd reprobate in (for the 6th time) it's nice to have something 'special' to look at on your wrist!


Oh yeah - concerning the 'harsh work environment'. You know what environment in which that watch was designed to be used, right? I feel it'll be OK in Manhatten, Beverly Hills, and anyplace in between.

Well, that's my take on it anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,545 Posts
A nice watch like that is perfect for daily use. My Rolex GMT travels the world with me from posh environments to rough 3rd world confines. I mow the lawn, swim and work on the car with it on. It's got plenty of scratches when viewed from 6 inches away but from a foot away looks brand new. I use all it's intended functions regularly. Unfortunately every month I have to unscrew and pull out the crown, count in my head for 15 seconds, push back and screw in the crown to set it back to perfect atomic time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,875 Posts
I tend to agree that given a job as a paramedic, I'd definitely want something I could hose down at the end of the day. A G-shock or other digital Casio is hard to argue against for work, but other inexpensive divers or water resistant tool watches would do fine as long as they don't cost more than you're willing to lose... and can be hosed off as necessary.

I don't want to dissuade the OP from buying what he wants, but it's entirely OK to have watches for specific situations. If work is hazardous, don't wear anything you can't afford to ruin and don't wear anything that's *likely* to have problems down the road. If you're OK with a more expensive watch being at risk, that's fine-- but I'd still ensure it's as durable and water resistant as possible (so perhaps something like an Archimede Outdoor or Sinn to split the difference.) As others have said, just make sure your watch at work is the correct tool for the job and you're comfortable with any risk.

As for "using" my watch-- all my watches tell time and I expect to use them to tell time. ;-)

I'll never take a Diver scuba diving. I'll never pilot a plane or drop bombs while wearing a Flieger. That's OK :-D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
231 Posts
Just get a cheap daily watch for your ambulance work, so you don't need to worry and replace it when something breaks or gets dirty.

1. In answer to your other question, I believe that would be an excellent choice for the following reasons (which you have already figured out)

2. Too much money for a watch to use this way?
Look at it like this:
1) How much is your ambulance worth? Would you want to work out of a Chrysler minivan stocked with a thermometer and Band Aids?
2) It's NOT - NOT - NOT a luxury item. It's a TOOL., An expensive one, yes. But a damn good one. Notice that professional mechanics use Snap On, not the Lowes brand.
3) It's your job man, the watch may someday make a difference.
4) In between scooping brains off the pavement and hauling an OD'd reprobate in (for the 6th time) it's nice to have something 'special' to look at on your wrist!
1. There are plenty of watches available that meet his requirements and are a lot cheaper.

2. The ambulance analogy is such a bad one... come on.
And how would it even make a difference one day. Give me one good example that you can't do with a reliable digital watch?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,012 Posts
Very respectable opinions, thank you very much.

I also imagine the Skywalker X-33 would handle pretty much anything I could throw at it. A few dings/dents/chips wouldn't bother me.

I am more or less struggling with the idea that not many people wear a luxury type watch while at work in a more harsh environment... Regardless of its functionality.
A decent auto with good water resistance (100m is the recommended minimum for swimming) should be able to handle almost anything that most people see in their work environment. Before and after the quartz crisis, people soldiered with simple automatics and did just fine. It's a bit trickier with mechanical chrono's, though, because they tend to have lower WR than 100m. But, if swimming isn't something you have to worry about, most should serve well.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,843 Posts
Very respectable opinions, thank you very much.

I also imagine the Skywalker X-33 would handle pretty much anything I could throw at it. A few dings/dents/chips wouldn't bother me.

I am more or less struggling with the idea that not many people wear a luxury type watch while at work in a more harsh environment... Regardless of its functionality.
Yeah, plus the X-33 is one bad ass watch. A tad too large for me as I am switching towards smaller watches, but nevertheless I like it a lot.


Though if I was in your shoes, I would be more concerned about bodily fluids and chemicals, rather than damage to the exterior from scratches and dings. There is something to me that when I think vomit, blood, saliva, feces, urine and all other things that a human body contains says "G-Shock". Not that it would impair the functionality of the X-33, but I wouldn't feel comfy wearing it afterwards say at the dinner table knowing what has been on it. A G-Shock you would just wash it and throw it aside, ready for the next sortie, so to speak...

PS: talking about G-Shock... How about this one:
CASIO GW-9400RDJ-4JF RANGEMAN MEN IN RESCUE RED | seiyajapan.com
"Men in Rescue" edition... This screams "paramedic" to me (as in made especially for)... I say get something like this and then get yourself the X-33. One for the job, one for everything else...
 

·
Registered
Rolex datejust
Joined
·
914 Posts
If you have money to spend, Omega speedmaster moon watch would be a great watch. The reason is because they use a different material for the crystal instead of sapphire. And they do that because sapphire if it cracked would cause too many issues for astronauts in space. And it comes with a chronograph function as well as a tachymeter bezel but you would probably end up using the chronograph more than the tachymeter anyways. As others have said, G-Shocks are a great option as a daily wear watch. Also anything by Citizen or Seiko would be good as well. Or even a Hamilton chronograph watch would be my other suggestion. The good thing about Hamilton is that most of their chronographs have decent water resistant, and their crystal is sapphire which makes it scratch resistant and can hold up with your job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Op,

I am in similar line off work (cop) and currently wear a Seiko SKX173 dive watch to work after years of gshock and Timex digital, A few points:

As far as using the watch, dispatch will keep track of all the times you need and will probably be on your ticket. Any modern watch will do anything you need for work.

Check your contract, off the top of my head I think we get $100 towards personal property (except eyeglasses) such as a watch if damaged in the course of duty. That's enough for me to replace a broken crystal on my Seiko, but not likely on an Omega.

Everyone will tell you to run out and buy a gshock, and while there great watches, they're pretty thick. Especially when trying to slip on gloves or under the cuff of a long sleeve uniform shirt.

Lume is nice but nothing compared to indiglo. Lume has an advantage of not needing a second hand to activate, but some timex ironman watches don't either.

My advice, pick up an ironman to wear on the job and the Omega off. So why do I wear an auto to work, because I want to. So if you, like I, insist on wearing an auto to work, then pick up one that can be cleaned easily (no leather and bracelets have too many nooks and crannies to sterilize), is fairly tough, and inexpensive enough that if its destroyed you won't cry too much. Perhaps a Seiko dive watch on rubber strap.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Thank you guys for the constructive dialogue!

All very respectable opinions, I certainly will continue to think hard about this potential purchase.

Love the fact that we can even chat about this kinda stuff, we for sure are watch nerds!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,075 Posts
The watch I'm eyeballing is the Omega Speedmaster Skywalker X-33 (roughly $6000)... Is it too much watch to be used on duty? Do any of you guys use a luxury type watch in a harsh or rough work environment? I would love to hear your thoughts and opinions!
First off, let me say this: There is no way I could do what you do. I'm a police officer, and I see what you guys have to deal with and, well, screw that - I like my job better!

To answer your question, no, I don't think there is a problem with you wearing an expensive watch on duty. If you're going to drop that much coin on a watch, you better damn well enjoy it. I have changed my watch-buying habits over the past few years, but up until a couple years ago I wore my Rolex Sub and Explorer 1 to work all the time. I'm a patrolman, not a desk jockey, so the watches were exposed to their fair share of "abuse." I figured I didn't want to just enjoy them one night per week, so I decided to wear them whenever I wanted. I did the same with Omega, Breitling, and Sinn.

Now, I'm enjoying affordables and spending my money on other things. Currently, my most expensive watch is a Movado that I paid about $700 for. You guessed it, I wear it to work when I'm in the mood.

Now, as for whether or not the Skywalker is worth $6000... that's another story. I *really* like the Skywalker, but I personally wouldn't pay more than $2500 for one. But, if you can afford it and it "sings" to you, buy that sucker and wear it at work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
463 Posts
Repeating an earlier cautionary note, if THIS > OMEGA Watches: Speedmaster Skywalker X-33 Chronograph 45 mm - Titanium on titanium - 318.90.45.79.01.001 > is the watch we are talking about, the water resistance of only 3 bar is inadequate in my view for the job you are intending to use it for and a minimum of 10 bar would be far more suitable.

(I could also suggest that is is VERY expensive for a quartz watch, even HAQ, but hey to each his own)

I cannot pretend to know the full nature of the situations you encounter in your work - other than to have the utmost respect for what you do. However, I am imagining that some of the situations can be arduous and hazardous to say the least. Buy the watch for your own use but I would give serious consideration to having that beater on your wrist at work or it may all end in tears.
 
1 - 20 of 53 Posts
Top