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Would a watch that is filled with oil (such as the Bell and Ross Hydromax) ever need to be serviced?

It seems like the oil in there would serve as a lubricant. What do you think?
 

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It could suffer from bumps same as any other watch. Or, [deity] forbid, if the watch cracks a leak somewhere....

I'd guess that the oil would serve as lubrication, and whisk away any small friction-caused particles.
 

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Sinn has a good write-up explaining oil use in watches. Note - only quartz watches can be oil filled, as the oscilation of the balance in a mechanical watch would not overcome the density of liquid.
Sinn Uhren: HYDRO

Looks like service has to be done with manufacturer - Sinn charges 220 euro for service on Hydro. They say batteries can only be replaced during std overhaul and movement must be cleaned of oil.
https://www.sinn.de/en/Download/Sinn_ServicePriceList.pdf

Then again, there is a great photo-essay on F2 right now where the poster filled his digital casio with olive oil, so I guess it is possible to open oil filled watch on your own if you are willing to take the risk with Bell & Ross or Sinn priced watch
 

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When does an oil filled watch need a service?

1. When the battery, capacitor or whatever it is needs to be replaced.

2. When the seals have deteriorated.

3. When oil starts to leak.

4. When bubbles appear.

5. When the oil starts to smell bad.

6. When it needs to be polished.

7. When worn out parts of the mechanism need to be replaced.
 

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. . . . . as the oscilation of the balance in a mechanical watch would not overcome the density of liquid. . . .
Many mechanical movements will cheerfully chug along submerged in cleaning solution.

If the viscosity of an oil is low enough they could potentially run in it as well.

The period is different so the balance would have to be vibrated for a new rate - slower and geared accordingly.
 

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Many mechanical movements will cheerfully chug along submerged in cleaning solution.

If the viscosity of an oil is low enough they could potentially run in it as well.

The period is different so the balance would have to be vibrated for a new rate - slower and geared accordingly.
They will chug along. Not very cheerfully though, mainly because the resistance of oil is much greater than air and the power reserve will probably be very short. just wearing it on your wrist will probably not provide enough energy to keep it going.
 

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my oil filled car engine does
Your car engine is not "oil filled". Try literally filling the crankcase, combustion chambers, etc, with oil and try starting it.

Your car engine is lubricated by oil from a reservoir but it is by no means "oil filled".
 

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They will chug along. Not very cheerfully though, mainly because the resistance of oil is much greater than air and the power reserve will probably be very short. just wearing it on your wrist will probably not provide enough energy to keep it going.
They will run as long as you design them to.

The pinlever seems to have a slight advantage over the anchor pallet in liquid filled operation.

A bigger barrel with a much stronger mainspring would improve flooded amplitude and reserve.

The fluid would dampen the increased impacts in the escapement that such an increase in torque would yield.

From a timekeeping perspective I can't think of a reason that I would require fluid or oil saturation but as a simple mechanical exercise this has already been accomplished in principal if not commercial application.
 

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Yes.
The oil in your watch allows a very high level of water resistance without the need of an escape valve.
Your quartz movement will still require battery and gasket replacement.
Refer to Seibei's response in post #7.

Sent from my SM-T550 using Tapatalk
 

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Many mechanical movements will cheerfully chug along submerged in cleaning solution.

If the viscosity of an oil is low enough they could potentially run in it as well.

The period is different so the balance would have to be vibrated for a new rate - slower and geared accordingly.
I appreciate your technical knowledge of mechanical watches, but can you share a single example of an oil filled mechanical watch?
Ressence Type 3\5 are automatics, but only the upper chamber is filled with oil and movement is allowed to operate unimpeded.

Being able to throw-out technical theoretical scenarios without practical application is not very helpful.
 

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I appreciate your technical knowledge of mechanical watches, but can you share a single example of an oil filled mechanical watch?
Ressence Type 3\5 are automatics, but only the upper chamber is filled with oil and movement is allowed to operate unimpeded.
Being able to throw-out technical theoretical scenarios without practical application is not very helpful.
Nothing theoretical whatsoever.

It's not uncommon to preclean a particular dirty movement prior to full disassembly.

When the solvents in your soak sufficiently loosen the death grip that the dried oils in the jewels have on the pivots its not uncommon for movement to start - particularly since the mainspring is often wound to its limits against the click.

Solvent often contains enough paraffin and used lubricants to constitute an oil- albeit a light one.

The movement is then operating in oil and if the earth slow sufficiently or you repainted your dial you could use it in some fashion to keep time.

The presence of fluid is however a handicap the development of an efficient mechanical oscillator based timepiece but a movement doesn't necessary stop when immersed.
 
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