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I just received a Pathfinder PAW-1500 and love it. All of the bells and whistles are fun to play with, but does anybody actually rely on the altimeter? I live in a flat desert location and adjusted it to what the local altitude is a couple of days ago. Since then, the altitude displayed has climbed about 250 feet, even though the watch hasn't gone up or down more than 30 feet at the most.

I'm wondering why include an altimeter if it isn't the least bit accurate? Or, am I missing something that I need to adjust to make it work correctly?
 

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I'm not familiar with that model, does it use the barometer to calculate the altitude? If so as the air pressure changes each day it will mean the altitude loses accuracy. I set the 'reference altitude' every morning by calibrating it to a known height. It should all be in the manual.

Welcome to the forum :-!
 

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Yeah, I do. Okay, have done about 3 times. The area where I live is pretty flat too, but I have done some trips to where there are some real hills (although just 600, 800 and 1200 m above the see level respectively, yeah so nothing extreme but you can see how useful it is that you can neatly see on the altimetre "where you are") and I suggest you to do the same, if you want to try it out.

The altimeter is, as I have experienced, quite reliable as compared to my gps (and possibly maps). I think it is quite accurate as soon as 1) you calibrate it in the beginning of the trip 2) the weather remains stable more or less. Also the compass shows quite accurate against my gps (I never needed to calibrate it or anything).

Love my PRW-1500. If you want some more stuff you can read
https://www.watchuseek.com/showthread.php?t=297466
 

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I own three watches with altimeters and don't use it. There are no significant changes in elevation here where I live. The barometer is the most useful feature for me.
 

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I'm wondering why include an altimeter if it isn't the least bit accurate
because it is a casio, plain and simple.

the non-existing altimeter lock, as well as the lack of sea-level pressure, as well as the lack of proper thermo-compensation are constant critic points which i am - along with member queen6 - are complaining about. personally i'm done with casio AB sensors (the C's are okay so far) and won't neither buy nor recommend a pro-trek/pathfinder watch to anyone anymore, unless casio decides to change those obvious flaws. there are enough alternatives out there with a whole lot better and more precise sensors than casio does offer.

Or, am I missing something that I need to adjust to make it work correctly?
no, unfortunately you don't miss a thing. the only thing you can do, is to recalibrate your watch's altimeter as often as you can and hope that air pressure doesn't change much or nothing at all....o|


cheers
 

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I just received a Pathfinder PAW-1500 and love it. All of the bells and whistles are fun to play with, but does anybody actually rely on the altimeter? I live in a flat desert location and adjusted it to what the local altitude is a couple of days ago. Since then, the altitude displayed has climbed about 250 feet, even though the watch hasn't gone up or down more than 30 feet at the most.

I'm wondering why include an altimeter if it isn't the least bit accurate? Or, am I missing something that I need to adjust to make it work correctly?

here is how casio intends the alti to work, and how they describe it in the manual.

you want to go out on a hike. in the morning you have an energy bar and some water and find a reference altitude for your starting point. a map or sign for example. then you set the watch to that reference. off you go for the morning, having lunch - a fresh bit of pita bread wrapping around some bagged tuna with pesto and sundried tomatoes - at the picnic table at the top of the hill. then down again the backside - let's take a picture of that river - and before you know it there's the parking lot again. it's time to go home. you check your watch it and it will have done a pretty good job tracking your rate of ascent, your highest point, your total ascent and it even tells time. in other words, to get the most from your altimeter, you use known references and collect data during a relatively short amount of time or within a local area (i.e. don't collect across changing weather systems and expect accuracy)
 

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Welcome to the forum. :-!

I use the barometer graph on my Riseman all the time. But mainly just to check for trends in the weather. I don't usually have a need to know my elevation in day to day life, but it's handy when hiking or biking in the mountains.
 

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here is how casio intends the alti to work, and how they describe it in the manual.

you want to go out on a hike. in the morning you have an energy bar and some water and find a reference altitude for your starting point. a map or sign for example. then you set the watch to that reference. off you go for the morning, having lunch - a fresh bit of pita bread wrapping around some bagged tuna with pesto and sundried tomatoes - at the picnic table at the top of the hill. then down again the backside - let's take a picture of that river - and before you know it there's the parking lot again. it's time to go home. you check your watch it and it will have done a pretty good job tracking your rate of ascent, your highest point, your total ascent and it even tells time. in other words, to get the most from your altimeter, you use known references and collect data during a relatively short amount of time or within a local area (i.e. don't collect across changing weather systems and expect accuracy)
:-d:-d|>
 

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because it is a casio, plain and simple.

the non-existing altimeter lock, as well as the lack of sea-level pressure, as well as the lack of proper thermo-compensation are constant critic points which i am - along with member queen6 - are complaining about. personally i'm done with casio AB sensors (the C's are okay so far) and won't neither buy nor recommend a pro-trek/pathfinder watch to anyone anymore, unless casio decides to change those obvious flaws. there are enough alternatives out there with a whole lot better and more precise sensors than casio does offer.
Well said!

I look to my Suunto's for the ABC features that I need and use.

Cheers... ;-)
 

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lol :-d

7millibars difference are equal to about 57 meters - so either madman01 must be a giant, or the other guy is really VERY short ;-)


cheers
No I am not that high, unless I eat of those giant mushrooms with a talking caterpillar sitting on them :-d
 

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what about the new casio prg 120 ? looks cool.. it also lacks the altimeter lock etc..?
 

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I have a Riseman because I live in the mountains.
I have memorized most of the altitudes in the city verses the mountains.
The Riseman was pretty accurate.
The fun part of the watch is to use it for timing descents and climbs.
It's pretty cool to see how fast you can go down a trail on a bike, skis or sled.
And the weather hopefully won't change much in the 5 or 20 minutes you take to
cruise down a mountain. So the pressure won't affect the altimeter.
If you know the distance and the time you can calculate the average speed also.
I'm so anal I time the cable cars and ski lifts.
 

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It's a bit of a gimick, but above all it's FUN :-!

The end.
 
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