WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just found this hand-wound watch in the back of a drawer. My grandfather gave it to me when I was about 10 or 11 so I'm sure there's no monetary value to it, but somehow I like its looks. Unfortunately I have no tools here to open it up and take a photo of its movement. Would anyone happen to have some information on this watch?

ZUjPF.jpg
iAStB.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,167 Posts
Coin watches have been around for years. Many take real coins, hollow them out, and place a small movement (usually quartz) inside. Those usually incorporate both sides of the coin and actually do have a lot of gold in them. Corum has made a number over the years. And many take what looks like a real coin to use as a dial but don't actually use a real coin. Those have novelty value. Swank has made a number of these.

I'm not a coin collector but this looks like a real coin to me. But the caseback makes me think it is not. I suspect it is in the novelty class... Unless the movement is identified, I doubt the original maker could be determined.

The coin watches made from silver dollars or half dollars are more moderately priced and I've collected a few. They polish up nicely and look good on the wrist. (I usually polish off the 'swiss made' or brand name if printed on the coin. That makes them look neater in my opinion ... and since they are my watches, I don't care what others think LOL)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for your answer, Eeeb!
That's what I was thinking: a watch with some kind of novelty and sentimental value that still runs surprisingly accurate. I think I will get it a new watchband, polish the case, maybe ask a local watchmaker to take a look inside and finally enjoy it on some weird occasion wearing a red bow tie and a cowboy hat (not sure why I'm referencing Doctor Who, just thought it was fitting ;)).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,965 Posts
I'm not a coin collector but this looks like a real coin to me. But the caseback makes me think it is not. I suspect it is in the novelty class... Unless the movement is identified, I doubt the original maker could be determined.
It is most certainly not a real coin. The real ones say "TWENTY DOLLARS" at the bottom, beginning in 1877. Prior to that, they said "TWENTY D.", but none of those would likely been used for making a watch, they are extremely valuable above their gold content.

257274_r.jpg 1857_20_sscentralam_pcgs_ms64_rev.jpg

Hope this helps,
gatorcpa
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top