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I have an O1V with the ST.5 movement. I would like to get this watch engraved for my son.

This may be a dumb question, but will engraving the watch damage the movement? I have read that you shouldn't wear an automatic watch while mowing the lawn or riding a motorcycle and I wonder if the vibration would have a negative impact on the internals of the movement.

thanks
 

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I've worn an auto watch while both mowing the lawn and riding a motorcycle with no ill effects.

If you are truly concerned, you could have the caseback removed, then engraved, then replaced. Steinhart casebacks have engraving already on them so you might want to do this anyway. You could have the stock Steinhart engraving polished out, giving you a "blank slate" to work with for your message.
 

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I have an O1V with the ST.5 movement. I would like to get this watch engraved for my son.

This may be a dumb question, but will engraving the watch damage the movement? I have read that you shouldn't wear an automatic watch while mowing the lawn or riding a motorcycle and I wonder if the vibration would have a negative impact on the internals of the movement.

thanks
I have worn my Submariner 5512 for 30 years while working underwater on Offshore Oil production installations, some of the work involved the use of big hydraulic impact wrench on bolted sealine flanges.
For those unfamiliar with the tool, think oversized (X3) hand held hammer drill, never had any problem with the watch movement.
 

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Hell, I've even crashed many a motorcycle (on and off-road) and not had any issues with the watch I was wearing.

Reminds me of a last minute recommendation passed on to trainee paratroopers at Pau jumping school, in case both your parachutes malfunction, enjoy the flight and remember to raise your left arm before impact to protect your watch.
 

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I have an O1V with the ST.5 movement. I would like to get this watch engraved for my son.

This may be a dumb question, but will engraving the watch damage the movement? I have read that you shouldn't wear an automatic watch while mowing the lawn or riding a motorcycle and I wonder if the vibration would have a negative impact on the internals of the movement.

thanks
Not unless the engraver pokes a hole in the case.

All the best.
 
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Hell, I've even crashed many a motorcycle (on and off-road) and not had any issues with the watch I was wearing.
Same here. In my younger days I had two crashes with the same watch (a Seiko Kinetic), and aside from quite a bit of wear and tear to the bracelet it kept running like a charm. Couldn't say the same for my leg unfortunately... A pic from yesteryear:
Christ Air small.jpg
 

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Motorcycle vibration can be almost non-existent, or pretty severe, depending on what kind of motorcycle you have. Traditionally, most motorcycles had only one or two cylinders. According to Jay Leno, a lot of the famous British twins of the 50's and 60's, vibrated enough at high speeds to shake watch hands right off the ends of the shafts. Road tests in old magazines refer to the vibration of the ironhead Sportsters of that same era as "awesome". BMW's had a reputation for smoothness because they were one of the least objectionable. Indian discontinued their four-cylinder engine when they shut down civilian production for WW2, and never brought it back. Ariel discontinued their 4 in 1959. Finally, in 1968, several 3 and 4 cylinder bikes were introduced, and since then, almost all motorcycles have been much smoother than before that time.

Remember that part of the NASA testing for the space program involved subjecting the watches to vibration at various frequencies for extended periods of time. The Omega which eventually was accepted still was affected by the vibration tests (gaining significant time at a certain frequency, if I recall). You could conceivably have an engine that vibrated at just the right frequency to match the natural frequency of your movement. Personally, when I ride, I wear an inexpensive plastic digital watch similar to a G-shock because it is essentially immune to vibration in the range that a motorcycle engine runs and because it is very lightweight and doesn't make it's presence known. If for any reason there is an accident, the loss of such a watch would not be felt as badly as a more expensive watch.
 
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