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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I posed this question in another thread and based on my own ignorance of the intricacies of the various mechanical movements, I pose the question separately.

Based on the different movements, please post up suggestions for those of us that may not realize some precautions to take with the various movements! I am personally wondering if there are any special setting precautions associated with the Calibre 16 movement I am about to take ownership of. How about any concerns like cautions around magnetic sources or suggestions regarding safe ways to clean up minor nicks and scratches? Not really specific questions, but offering examples...

I ask that you list the movement(s) and/or models the suggestion would apply to. If it is based on a limitation of the movement (or could cause damage) please indicate as such, as opposed to a good idea for optimal performance or routine care...

Yes, I am military and tend to over-analyze things but I would bet there is a TON of experience out there that would benefit noobs like me!


/r

Allen
 

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Depth ratings are not suggestions.

What a lot of people dont know is that a 50 or 100m depth rating can be circumvented without even subca diving.

The rating is for pressure and 50m of pressure can be experienced if you take a fall off a water pleasure craft or even diving-board diving.

Add a little time to the seals and im sure even a 100m rated watch can fall victim to the same problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I must be the post-leper or just a rock. Threads I start here seem to die an inactive and uneventful death... o|
My goal was to learn and to perhaps consolidate useful info for other's to benefit from.

Since I am already subscribed (as the thread starter) and hope to gain some knowledge, here are some points found in other threads:


- Don't have your watch on the wrist while you are adjusting it or screwing the crown up or down, always have it in your hand.

- If the watch has a screw-down crown, be sure to unscrew the crown before affecting any changes to the settings or attempting to manually wind it. This may sound like a monumentally obvious, " well no-shate" statement but if you are new to a particular watch or unfamiliar with the model (I don't know, looking at it in a store) it would be relevant.

- As to the above screw-down crown, even more important: screw the crown back after having finished the settings. As you have to push and screw at the same time, this is difficult to get the right feeling in your fingers. As you may get no "feedback" from the watch if the crown is screwed tight enough, you will need to train that! Any mistakes here could result in a loss of water resistancy.

- you should not change the date indicator while the time is set somewhere between 8 and 2 o'clock. So first change time e.g. to 6 o'clock, then set the date and afterwards set back time.

- you should not try to set the date backwards (like from 17th back to 16th).


More to follow, I hope...

/r

Allen
 

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What you do with your watch often depends on the movement and on how the watch/watchcase is designed which means that there aren't any hard rules on what to do or don't do beyond the obvious.
If you want to compile a more meaningful list then perhaps you should look at individual watch movements instead of being general and looking at watches as a whole.
 
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