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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Everyone and Happy Holidays!
Picked up this Douglas World Time off Ebay. I can't find out what movement it has, it apparently has 17 Jewels, but I can't take the back off...yet. Thought maybe some of you have come across this before?? You can see the word "France" at the 6 position, French made I take it? Perhaps our good Friend John In France could shed some light??? Thanks in advance for your help.
The only tool I have to open watch backs is shown, what tool would you recommend for this type of back? :think:
DSCN2893.JPG DSCN2885.JPG 20121201_195618_zps4889efbe.jpg
It's in great shape, other than some scuff marks on the crystal at about the 4 and 5 position that I'm sure can be buff out.:-!
 

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Use a real wrench to open the case... unless you don't mind caseback scratches.

Nice lume. It will look good with a new crystal!!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys! After posting last night I did try a real wrench, still can't get it off... it's on there TIGHT! I'll keep trying. Thanks again.
 

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I have some vague recollection of an unnamed forum participant relating the story (in another venue) about the torture of an uncooperative caseback. The watch in question was transported to a secure laboratory facility in northern Europe where the case was then mounted in the four jaw chuck of a bench top lathe. Heat (and possibly electrical current) was applied to the caseback after it had previously been wrapped in coarse burlap and doused in a persistent stream petroleum distillate (while being inverted). The case and caseback was then struck repeatedly with a hammer faced with a soft malleable material so as to minimize permanent scarring (while maximizing shock). A large adjustable wrench was then applied to the lugs of the caseback to exerted pressure on it as the chuck was turned in the opposite direction. A piece of dimensioned lumber was also employed in some fashion.

The results have been redacted from the official record.

p
 

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In a similar vein, someone who shall remain nameless, once posted a 'joke' response to a similar situation - encouraging the questioner to superglue a lever/spanner to the caseback. Once removed, soak in acetone to remove.

The problem with the joke, is, that it actually works. And is very similar to the method published in (IIRC) the TM9-1575 US military watch servicing guide, which involved a broomstick and adhesive.
 

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I believe eeeb was speaking of a 3-pronged caseback wrench, not an adjustable wrench from your local hardware store. The caseback has those series of scallops, whereas the OP's wrench only has the square-faced pegs. I have a simple caseback wrench that came from the online garage sale, but it has several different types of pegs, including round ones. I think those would have the best chance of imparting force to those scallops without damage.
In other words, put down the wrench and step away! It's such an easy thing to permanently damage a caseback, I know from experience.

I remember seeing that one on the bay, it looked interesting. Didn't the original listing say that it needed work? An extra bonus if it arrived working.
 

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That's what I meant!

One other factor is to use dry ice on the caseback to get it to shrink... if you can get the dry ice.

My watchmaker has a bench mounted caseback vice. It opens things I have never been able to budge.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I have put the wrenches down and stepped away, it’s VERY tight. I hate the thought of scratching it. It’s running beautifully, the pictures don’t’ show it, but the second hand is a BRILLANT ruby red.
I don’t know if this would shed some light on what kind of movement it is but the “Wind capacity” (sorry I’m sure my terminology is wrong) is very long, as I stated to John, you wind and wind and WIND until it is tight. I have never had a watch that takes that much winding to get it tight. I’m still keeping tack, but this afternoon will be almost 72 hours since its last full wind. Perhaps that’s normal, it just seems my other wind up’s don’t last that long and they don’t take allot of winding. Thanks as always everyone for your thoughts!

p.s. Eeeb, I like the idea of dry ice, very interesting, I remember Ice creams shops used to carry dry ice.
 

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That is a good long time between winds! One thing, some automatics have a clutch mechanism that will allow you to wind it for days on end without feeling that tightness or resistance indicating a full wind. My daily-wear watch is like this (valjoux 7750), so if it is flat I wind it 30 times and then wear it. I suppose it should be mentioned that I'm not winding thirty 360° rotations of the crown, but just winding without removing my fingers from the crown, so maybe 180°?
 

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Thanks guys! After posting last night I did try a real wrench, still can't get it off... it's on there TIGHT! I'll keep trying. Thanks again.
A gasket o-ring may have melted in place due to age & heat (desert or sauna) and this would make it virtually impossible to remove without a vice. I have a badly abused Seiko that is in the same situation...
 
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