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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just thought I would share this. So I've started watching my 5 dvd watch repair and servicing disks. The first one was based around proper tools and work area! Nice and informative. I started the second one last night. It is complete disassembly and they are using a Waltham size 18 lever type, a size 18 Elgin and a size 16 Waltham pocket watches. It is setup to disassemble along with the video. I've decided to just watch first and then hands-on later. Luckily I have both waltham types they are using and so far very very informative. I'm surprised that it starts with a FP pocketwatch as from what I've seen, these are the hardest to put back together. I've only gotten thru half disassembly right now but am really enjoying it. Very nice closeup work and of each individual part and its operation.
 

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What is the title of the DVD series you are watching?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's "The Watch Repair Course" by John Tope. It has been very good visually and explanatory. I was hoping it had some info on wristwatches as it just deals with pocket watches. That's the main reason I got it was for pocket watches, but I do see that I may need to piddle with a watch now and then. Lol Right now I'm fine tuning some tools I need to replace, but I'm hoping to start my first complete disassembly in the next couple weeks. I have two size 18 walthams that need checked out.
 

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Glad that you found something that suited your learning style - I would think the visuals of the process from video would really help. Pretty much everything you learn from pocket watches can be applied to wrist watches. There are differences in the keyless works and differences based on size - but these are really manageable.

In general - smaller movements can be challenging to assemble. But one interesting thing I have found is that watch companies (apparently) really started thinking about ease of assembly at some point (in the late 1930s) - bigger screws, easier to handle bridges, etc.
 
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