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Discussion Starter #1
I bought a DW-5600C-9V for restoration purposes and wanted to get the back cover off.
However, it’s unbelievably stuck. I’m using a jaxxa tool to no avail.

Any recommendation to get the cover off?

thanks
 

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Super glue a nut to the case back and use a wrench to remove it, and once it's off use something with acetone like nail polish remover to dissolve the super glue. I've done this a couple of times with automatics that i wanted to regulate and it works great. Not an original idea by me, I googled it and found that others had used his method successfully.
 

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The pictures are no longer with the article, but the best method I have ever heard of (and used, by the way) is published here on out site: https://www.watchuseek.com/f43/my-screwback-opening-technique-639103.html
Basically, engage your tool & turn it upside down on a rug; press down on the watch while turning the watch - less chance of slippage & better torque on the case back. Give it a try before you slip with your tool & ruin the casebook forever. If that doesn't work, go to a watchmaker that has a professional tool for this.
 

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Super glue a nut to the case back and use a wrench to remove it, and once it's off use something with acetone like nail polish remover to dissolve the super glue. I've done this a couple of times with automatics that i wanted to regulate and it works great. Not an original idea by me, I googled it and found that others had used his method successfully.
Read about this before and many people have success with this.

Sounds crazy but seems like it does work.
 

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For the really tight case backs that I have removed required the watch to be placed into a watch holder. The watch holder is then placed into a bench vise, and a 3-prong case back removal tool is used. I also use a piece of thick plastic between the case back and removal tool so that if there is some slippage, it won't scratch the case back. So far, there hasn't been a tight case back that I haven't been able to remove. Once, I needed to use penetrating liquid to help get into the threads that were slightly corroded.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Did you use watch holder with jaxa tools?
With and without.


Super glue a nut to the case back and use a wrench to remove it, and once it's off use something with acetone like nail polish remover to dissolve the super glue. I've done this a couple of times with automatics that i wanted to regulate and it works great. Not an original idea by me, I googled it and found that others had used his method successfully.
With regular super glue? I'll try it if the jaxxa tool on the rug doesn't work. Thanks for the tip.


The pictures are no longer with the article, but the best method I have ever heard of (and used, by the way) is published here on out site: https://www.watchuseek.com/f43/my-screwback-opening-technique-639103.html
Basically, engage your tool & turn it upside down on a rug; press down on the watch while turning the watch - less chance of slippage & better torque on the case back. Give it a try before you slip with your tool & ruin the casebook forever. If that doesn't work, go to a watchmaker that has a professional tool for this.
I'll try it this weekend. Gotta find a rug first lol.



For the really tight case backs that I have removed required the watch to be placed into a watch holder. The watch holder is then placed into a bench vise, and a 3-prong case back removal tool is used. I also use a piece of thick plastic between the case back and removal tool so that if there is some slippage, it won't scratch the case back. So far, there hasn't been a tight case back that I haven't been able to remove. Once, I needed to use penetrating liquid to help get into the threads that were slightly corroded.
Thanks for the tip.
 

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I made the suggestion once to warm it up with a hair dryer and that worked for somebody.
 

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I made the suggestion once to warm it up with a hair dryer and that worked for somebody.
I would be very careful using a hair dryer - too much heat can cause the graphics under the crystal to delaminate. I never use any kind of heat on old vintage squares. Just like water can also damage the graphic under the crystal by forming air pockets/bubbles.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
For the really tight case backs that I have removed required the watch to be placed into a watch holder. The watch holder is then placed into a bench vise, and a 3-prong case back removal tool is used. I also use a piece of thick plastic between the case back and removal tool so that if there is some slippage, it won't scratch the case back. So far, there hasn't been a tight case back that I haven't been able to remove. Once, I needed to use penetrating liquid to help get into the threads that were slightly corroded.
Couldn't wait for the weekend and drove out the the garage.
And it's off! Thanks mate!
The inside smells so funky though...

IMG_0697.jpg
IMG_0698.jpg
 

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Couldn't wait for the weekend and drove out the the garage.
And it's off! Thanks mate!
The inside smells so funky though...

View attachment 13974515
View attachment 13974517
Congrats.

Make sure you get a new caseback o-ring for it.

Yeah they always smell funky but i see it as the smell of victory. These old vintages squares are so damn cool!!

Get it all cleaned up and wear it in good health.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Congrats.

Make sure you get a new caseback o-ring for it.

Yeah they always smell funky but i see it as the smell of victory. These old vintages squares are so damn cool!!

Get it all cleaned up and wear it in good health.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Thanks. I've added the o-ring to a new order. I have to wait till the first batch of parts comes in.
 

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Thanks. I've added the o-ring to a new order. I have to wait till the first batch of parts comes in.
Do you know a way to straighten the button stem? Two are kind of bent because the previous owner couldn't open the back cover.
I actually had to fix two bent ones last night.

I simply remove them and use flat jaw knipex pliers to straighten them as much as I can. They don’t need to be perfect. Just take your time and make very small adjustments and verify your work in between.



 

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Knipex... oh-oh -drool. Those are just THE best. And you have the whole set too, even the smallest one (which I never even knew existed). Sorry for the distraction.
yessir - I like nice quality tools as much as G-Shocks. there is even on size Knipex in between the small one and the one on the left.
 
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