WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there,

I have a DW-5600MS and I'd like to make the LCD a bit easier to read. I want to keep the negative display.

Is there a way to remove the "rusty" background color?

After disassembly, I've noticed that there's a silver foil on the inside of the LCD glass.

Does anyone know if the rusty color is on the glass itself, or maybe on the silver foil?

Or if it's painted on the glass, is there a way to remove it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,271 Posts
maybe Chempop or KeviO (and a very few others) will assist you for that question

HOWEVER, I googled for the G you mentioned
1. I have a few of negative displays like that, I don't think "easier to read but still negative" makes any senses to me
  • easier to read: convert it to positive
  • on negative: the easiest to read maybe the yellow/gold digits, then pink, green ... over this dark red dw-5600ms
but it is matter of perspective (depends on each person's eyes and environment)
to me they are hard to read all the same comparing to positive since I wears Gshock at nights to work
2. .....next time, pls post some pictures so we can have some ideas of what you are talking about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,515 Posts
I'm not sure where the color comes from. My guess is one (or both) of the polarizing filters are tinted.

The silver foil is the reflector on the backside of the LCD, you need that piece for sure, and I doubt it's where the color comes from. But I could be wrong, it's happened once before.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you both for answering.

g-fob2: I like the negative display, but that rust color is too dark for me.
I also have a GD-350-1B and as you mentioned, it has more of a gold/yellow background and is easier to read.

I didn't shoot any photos while my G-Shock was disassembled. I figured the pros here already know what I am talking about.
There's an old thread here on Watchuseek wich shows the positive display mod: here
Here's a picture of the rust/brown color:


And here's a screenshot of one of gshock highfashions DW-5600 comparison videos.
Both are DW-5600 LCDs, but only one has the silver foil just like the DW-5600MS and I thought maybe the brown color is on that foil.
15934958



I don't think "easier to read but still negative" makes any senses to me
  • on negative: the easiest to read maybe the yellow/gold digits
...next time, pls post some pictures so we can have some ideas of what you are talking about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,149 Posts
I haven't messed with replacing polarizing filters but this answer makes the most sense:

I'm not sure where the color comes from. My guess is one (or both) of the polarizing filters are tinted.
Hopefully someone chimes in on where to get high contrast polarizing filters that you can replace the red tinted one/s.
Keep us posted with any progress or if you destroy your watch in the process.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,515 Posts
Thank you both for answering.

g-fob2: I like the negative display, but that rust color is too dark for me.
I also have a GD-350-1B and as you mentioned, it has more of a gold/yellow background and is easier to read.

I didn't shoot any photos while my G-Shock was disassembled. I figured the pros here already know what I am talking about.
There's an old thread here on Watchuseek wich shows the positive display mod: here
Here's a picture of the rust/brown color:


And here's a screenshot of one of gshock highfashions DW-5600 comparison videos.
Both are DW-5600 LCDs, but only one has the silver foil just like the DW-5600MS and I thought maybe the brown color is on that foil.
View attachment 15934958
Hard to tell what's going on in that top photo showing the color, but I think that's either an extra film added to the backside of the LCD behind the rear polarizing filter or it's the rear polarizing filter itself.

They both have the silver foil, you can see it above and below in the top photo, it looks white in the pic.

On the LCD I fiddled with that foil was glued to the rear polarizing filter, if it's not glued to the filter on yours it would be easy to peel off the colored bit IF the colored bit is an additional layer and not the rear polarizing filter itself.

Working from front to rear, here's what most LCDs have:
Front polarizing filter
Actual LCD
Rear polarizing filter
Reflector (shiny silver piece)

If the red filter is an extra piece between the rear polarizing filter and reflector, and the reflector isn't glued to that piece, you should be able to remove it.

FWIW, on the LCD I messed with, the polarizing filters are thin but fairly rigid plastic sheets. The reflector is a much thinner, not rigid, film - like an aluminum foil sticker basically.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Nice analysis. :)
Hmm. I didn't know about the rear polarizing filter. I thought it only had a front one. That complicates things.
I hoped that I can just simply remove a layer and the brown is gone.


Hard to tell what's going on....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,034 Posts
remember that without controlled thickness optical bonding, the contrast performance of a polarizer will be suboptimal. I might go so far as to say "always suboptimal" :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,225 Posts
Nice analysis. :)
Hmm. I didn't know about the rear polarizing filter. I thought it only had a front one. That complicates things.
I hoped that I can just simply remove a layer and the brown is gone.
Here are some shots from a recent neg to pos mod I did on a DW-5600BB. There are two polarizer sheets, but I only removed the front one and replaced it with a piece of polarizer I bought that was described as for a mobile phone screen. I know you're on about keeping the display negative though, but the operation will be the same, just make sure to work out which way around the new polarizer needs to go before cutting to shape and sticking it down.

15935431

15935432

15935434


Your problem will be working out which polarizer has the red colour. Also, I think most G's have the markers for ALM, etc, on the rear side. What I don't know is if those markers are printed onto the LCD glass, or onto the rear polarizer, or possibly in between the two sheets of LCD glass. I've accidentally rubbed them off on another mod I did on a 6600 when cleaning the glue residue off after removing the rear polarizer!!

I think your best bet is to just remove the front polarizer first anyway, as it can easily be replaced if it isn't the red part. I suggest this because if it's the rear one that's red and you remove that first, you run the risk of losing the markers like I described. Obviously if it IS the rear polarizer that's red and you want rid of it, you still risk the markers by removing it then having to clean the glue residue off, (you can't get away with not cleaning it off). Another thing is if you want a kind of gold tint to the digits you'll need to find a thin gel sheet of that colour to place between the back of the LCD and module, (I think that's how you would change the colour of just the digits while keeping the rest of the display black). I'm not 100% sure on that though as it's not something I've tried before.

Actually another thought is that Casio have actually kind of printed the red colour onto the LCD, thus making it unchangeable anyway.

I hope the above is helpful to you?

Let us know how you get on 👍
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,515 Posts
KEEP IN MIND: If you replace the front polarizer, when you look at the watch while wearing polarized glasses the display will black out entirely. You'll have to rotate the watch (or your head) 90 degrees to be able to see the display. This does not happen if you replace the rear polarizing filter.

On the GW-B5000 I modified the outline around the date was indeed printed on the rear polarizing filter, so I lost it.

Stock polarizing filter off to the right, I damaged it a bit removing it.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thank you all for the helpful replies!

I see now that it's riskier than I thought and I must at least have some spare polarizing filter before I get to separating the layers.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top