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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi,

Here we go, a ~126 year old Labrador.






I did know lever-set Labradors even existed :|

But...

Poor thing needs a new lever for setting the time. And a new minute hand..

The lever itself looks quite complicated.
Other parts work as they should if the lever is hold in place where it should go if not broken.

What are my chances to get the part?








Any idea how the not broken whole thing should look like ?
 

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Re: early Pin-Set(broken) half hunter OMEGA Labrador. Sourcing the pin?

Looks to me more like lever-set which makes more sense as they used it on railroad grade watches. Either way it doesn’t look like parts are going to be easy to come by.
 

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Re: early Pin-Set(broken) half hunter OMEGA Labrador. Sourcing the pin?

You're best bet might be finding a watchmaker that knows how to make their own parts. It doesn't look too complicated but it'll still cost a pretty penny.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Re: early Pin-Set(broken) half hunter OMEGA Labrador. Sourcing the pin?

Looks to me more like lever-set which makes more sense as they used it on railroad grade watches. Either way it doesn’t look like parts are going to be easy to come by.
Thanks! I have no idea why did I name it pin..
 

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That's one broken lever, indeed...
Yes, this can be made by a skillful watchmaker with some good tools and machines (for quite some money, as it takes time and there are less and less people doing it) or you can search for parts movement that has the lever intact.
I don't know how rare or common lever set Labrador movements are, though...
Or you can try my way - look through American levers in the trash bin to see which one could be easily modified to fit - sometimes you have some luck and find a good match.
But it's finding a good, original part, that is always the best thing to do, whenever possible.
 

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It’s a nice watch and well worth finding the part for in my opinion, but then I’m biased as I’ve just bought a Labrador myself

You mentioned replacing the minute hand, what’s wrong with it? It looks ok to me, Louis Brandt/Omega were just about the best exponents of spade and whip hand sets back then.

I have a watchmaker that makes his own parts, as said he’s not cheap but he’s good. PM me if you want his details.

Matt


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Discussion Starter #8
the hand is probably not original and is loose
thanks busmatt i think i have his contacts
but the problem is the shipping LT -> UK, i have once sent(not yours watchmaker) Omega and it was stolen in UK, it was dual tone dial 50s bumper :(
 

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the hand is probably not original and is loose
thanks busmatt i think i have his contacts
but the problem is the shipping LT -> UK, i have once sent(not yours watchmaker) Omega and it was stolen in UK, it was dual tone dial 50s bumper :(
That’s a rotten thing to have happened

Matt


Brought to you by HYPNOTOAD
 

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laikrodukas...there is a ( small...) chance that another movement's part will fit / be able to be modified. Perhaps you know of someone who has many, old movements...something might be available. I suspect that there's a good chance that someone adept at, say, making jewelry could attach an end to your setting lever...there's not much stress on this piece, and a little piece of metal added would suffice.

And: I own a book entitled: "Twenty-First Century Watchmaking / Book One / The Joy of Making Parts With Ease ", by William O. Smith, CMW, CMC. It's a really neat essay on making flat pieces...dare I say, 'easily'? It's worth finding a copy. I do not yet do this work, but, going through the text, the Author really does make it look doable!

As I have long heard and read, it used to be that Watchmaker's were rather frequently called upon to accomplish such tasks such as the one you're facing. Nowadays--or so, judging from many comments here and elsewhere--such repairs have become a job reserved for Highly-Trained Experts and Restorers...if so, how sad. Mr. Smith makes it look like something that many of us could do, with a little effort and ambition.

Let's learn to do this Work ourselves, and leave the fabrication of, say, a repeater's 'minute snail', to the Real Professionals...now, THAT'S a job worth $$$! Michael.
 
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