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Are there watches or clocks that are electrically driven, but not quartz-timed?

Similarly, are there watches that feature a digital display, but is in fact mechanically powered and timed?
 

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Do you mean made now or historically? What about electrically timed and mechanically driven? The answer is yes anyway. The most familiar watch to most would be the Bulova Accutron, though I'll let the experts argue exact definitions.

So called 'jump hour' watches have been popular off and on since the start of the last century, though most tend to only jump the hour as the name suggests.
 

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Omega F300. Tuning fork movement.
 

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Hamilton introduced the electric watch in 1957. It featured a balance wheel that was essentially an oscillating electric motor, which drove the hands through an indexing system. There were other electrically driven balance wheel - type electrics after that, but Hamilton was first. They paid a price for it because the design they introduced was not ready for production - it was unreliable and fiddly to work on, and they hadn't trained their jewelers when they introduced them.



Bulova followed soon after with the Accutron, which used a tuning fork for timing. They hum, instead of ticking. Accutron fans advise against leaving them on your nightstand - the buzz will keep you awake!

Digital display watches have been around a long time. I think there were ones in the 30s, possibly earlier. Essentially they replace the hands with disks carrying the numbers which pass by windows cut into the otherwise solid face. Most have a mechanism so the hour 'jumps', while the minute disk just turns at a constant rate. There were a number of these in the 1950s, like Benrus' 'Dial-O-Rama' and Elgin's 'Direct Read' series. Elvis had one!



Some pocket watches of the 1920s and 30s had a 'secometer' dial instead of a second hand, which was the same idea - a disk attached to the 4th wheel post, partially visible through a window on the dial.
 

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The first mechanical digital jump hour watches appeared in the 1890's.

In the 50's & 60's it wasn't uncommon for mains powered electric clocks to be driven off the AC frequency, which meant that a clock designed for the US (60Hz) would run slow in the UK (50Hz)
 

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As for the digital face thats mechanically driven (if I understood that correctly), there's a Hamilton model currently out like that, and a company called Ventura (?) that almost all of their watches are digital but run mechanically.

Sent via Tapatalk
 

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I'm very sure that the movement is completely standard - these are normally just a few simple wheels dial side - this sort of setup, but slightly more complex for the dual minute wheels. Note the tooth at 30 on the minute wheel which 'jumps' a sprung pinion on the back of the hour wheel

R009710.jpg
 

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From a non-vintage perspective, modern electronic devices (like cellphones, etc) use IC clocks for timing, so if you consider your "phone" to be your watch/clock, then they'd qualify as electically driven but not quartz-timed. IC clocks aren't all that accurate, but since most of these devices synchronize their time against a network source (which in turn is usually synchronized against an atomic clock somewhere), it doesn't matter much.

There's a whole category of clocks that were either designed or retrofitted with electrical winding motors; they were essentially normal pendulum/spring based mechanical clocks with switches built in to trigger a motor that would wind the mainspring back up after it had run down enough. My 1936 Waltham Material Guide lists a "conversion" kit for doing this:
032 - Waltham Materials 1936.jpg_s.jpg
 

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The first mechanical digital jump hour watches appeared in the 1890's.

In the 50's & 60's it wasn't uncommon for mains powered electric clocks to be driven off the AC frequency, which meant that a clock designed for the US (60Hz) would run slow in the UK (50Hz)
1950's and 60's?

They were very common in the mid 1980's.....
 

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I still see a lot of 60 hz synchronous motor clocks in use around here in their original setting. They still chug away unobtrusively, and are more accurate than a battery quartz clock as long as the power doesn't go out(most of the better ones have a red indicator on the dial that indicates a power interruption). The tell tale with them is the perfectly smooth motion of the second hand.

In addition, Doug correctly mentioned the balance wheel electrics above. While Hamilton is best known for these, there were also a few other makers of them. I've seen a couple of Timex watches of this design-none of which are as well finished as the Hamiltons.
 

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In my old Opel Kadett I have an mechanical clock which have a solenoid which pulls the main spring like every 10minutes or something like that.

Rest is just an ordinary mechanical clock.
 
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