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The Rolex is mass produced steel, the VC is not. You should see these watches, the level of refinement is insane! Is hand-polished everywhere, ever the places you cant see. Would you like to own a watch everyone has or a rare timepiece you can be proud of your whole life?
 

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Always go with the heart. That's what you really want. A solid return on investment won't bring you as much pleasure. Or maybe it will... If you're more motivated by money.

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I honestly think the difference in price could delay such a purchase at least another two years. Right now the 37mm is probably 6 months away. I guess I could always trade in for the 40mm Gen 2 Chrono when/if the time comes...
In that case I'd go Milgauss and trade up when the time comes. Like others have said If you can go try them on. The 37mm might not wear that small. I think you'll be in a better position to move from Milgauss to VC. Rather then VC to VC.
 

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Personally I would jump at the chance to own a VC overseas. I like the 37mm size of the phase 1 VCs but It can be considered small by some. I will always go for a used/ vintage watch of a "higher horology" brand like VC than a new or modern watch of same price point. To me it just seem a better bang for your money and you'll have a rarer, more interesting piece. There will always be more rolexes but VC 1s in good condition may be harder to find as time goes on.
 

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I bought the Milguass (secondary market) and it lasted 3 weeks on my wrist! I sold it because it did not give me the feeling a high horology piece does (in my case Glashütte Original) For me the VC is an EASY choice! Follow the quality, not the hype!
 
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I am curious, are you saying the VC dials and hands are more fragile than on a "typical" watch?
In general, no, I didn't find them to be any more fragile than most other brands. But, like every other brand, there are specific things to look for with each model. In some it might be related to the movement, others the case, etc. With this model, the hands in particular have several sharp features that, if not handled carefully, can show damage easily (I used wooden tweezers to handle them).
 

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Great discussion!

Please also keep in mind that, with the first gen VC Overseas, you're not getting a VC movement. These run on GP 3300 movements which are tenuously "high horology" at best (my Ebel Type-E has one too). FWIW.
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Please also keep in mind that, with the first gen VC Overseas, you're not getting a VC movement. These run on GP 3300 movements which are tenuously "high horology" at best (my Ebel Type-E has one too). FWIW.
The second generation VC Overseas doesn't have an in-house VC movement either, it uses a JLC 889/2 ebauche.
 
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I have about an 18.5 cm wrist and anything less than 40 mm seems too small to me. Also I have learned I don't like blue sunray dials.
Sorry, I don't get the milgaus either. Watches with no date look incomplete to me and are less functional.
 

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So, I guess I'm outing myself a bit here, but I can give some insight. I worked as a watchmaker for Vacheron for several years, so know these watches inside and out. This generation uses a Girard Perregaux base caliber, which is an excellent movement. Very reliable, long service intervals, 50 hour power reserve, and thin... I much prefer it to the JLC movement used in the OVS II models. Do note that your options for straps are limited, if not impossible. The case and bracelet should only be refinished by Vacheron, otherwise you risk ruining the integrity of the case shape forever. These wear more like a slightly larger watch, partially due to the case shape and integrated bracelet. Make sure to get detailed pictures of the condition of the case, dial and hands... these dials could start peeling if handled improperly, and the hands are frequently damaged by careless watchmakers. You can message me privately if you have other questions. It's a great watch, one I'd love to have at some point in the future.
great post

how about the Gen 3 (the latest releases i believe with the interchangeable straps), sir? What insi
 

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The Rolex is mass produced steel, the VC is not. You should see these watches, the level of refinement is insane! Is hand-polished everywhere, ever the places you cant see. Would you like to own a watch everyone has or a rare timepiece you can be proud of your whole life?
Couple points:

1. The VC is mass produced. There aren't as many of them out there as the Rolex, maybe. But just because something is hand finished doesn't mean it isn't a product of mass production techniques.

2. Everyone doesn't have a Rolex. Everyone especially doesn't have a Milgauss. I don't know where some of you people live that you see Rolexes on every arm - but I'm guessing it must be some place special... because in the real world I rarely see Rolexes on people.

3. Being 'proud' of a watch is kind of weird.
 
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If it were me I’d get the Milgauss, but in z-blue. It’s something I actually did in fact. Vis-a-vis that Vacheron Constantin I have three reasons why:

1. the Milgauss has stop/hacking seconds. The Overseas does not, even in its most modern iteration. Unacceptable.
2. The dial on the Vacheron is amazing but the dial on the blue Milgauss is quite unique - it’s a shade of oceanic blue that is hard to find anywhere else.
3. The Vacheron has those weird dugouts in the bezel. I don’t understand why. I much prefer the simple forms on the Milgauss.
4. while the forms on the Milgauss are classic, there are so many quirky design elements that take it out of the classical Rolex look - crazy dial colors, green crystal, orange on the dial, orange on the seconds hand... it’s just a fun piece to the deadly and dull seriousness of the Vacheron.
5. 37mm is too small for my wrist.
6. The Milgauss, particularly in Z-blue, has superior value retention. Not such an issue if you’re buying a used and already depreciated G1 Overseas, but I like the idea of watches that hold value or appreciate.
7. service costs on the Milgauss will be far lower, and less frequent.
8. Pretty much the only thing I like better about the Vacheron is the exhibition case-back. I wish Rolex had those, with movements to match the view.
 

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the Milgauss has stop/hacking seconds. The Overseas does not, even in its most modern iteration. Unacceptable.
My second generation VC Overseas hacks, not sure about the other two generations.
 

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great post

how about the Gen 3 (the latest releases i believe with the interchangeable straps), sir? What insi
The latest releases are a totally different level, as the price reflects. The movement is all in-house produced, (truly) beautifully finished throughout. Sturdy construction, 60 hour power reserve, I think. Much more refined case and bracelet vs Gen II, though it trades a bit of its sportiness for elegance. For me the current generation is what the Overseas was always meant to be, and a worthy successor to the iconic 222. But, again, it's price reflects its position as a true luxury "sports" watch.
 

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Last year I decided to go for "entry level high horology," as you put it, with a Lange Saxonia Thin. I don't regret the decision for a minute. When you get into brands like these, "entry level" really only means price, not quality. If I were you, I would go for the Overseas, and without hesitation.
 

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Very well put thank you. I think what I'll do is try and find a 37mm watch locally to tey on and if that fails I may try to model and 3D print one. Just to give me a sense of the dimensions.

Very good advice overall. This hobby certainly isn't a logical one.
I agree, this hobby is not logical. For me, servicing cost is a concern as well. If I were you, unless there's something must-have about Overseas that I want (mostly, it'd be the look), I'd go for alternatives that are cheaper to service. Personally, there's no aspect from "high horology" that I want at this point. Having experienced "mid-tier" is good enough for me.

Having seen mav's video about the easy bracelet/strap change feature, that's a really nice feature in my mind, but since I like original bracelet on my watches and don't change to bracelet/strap at all, not applicable to me.
 

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If it were me I’d get the Milgauss, but in z-blue. It’s something I actually did in fact. Vis-a-vis that Vacheron Constantin I have three reasons why:

1. the Milgauss has stop/hacking seconds. The Overseas does not, even in its most modern iteration. Unacceptable.
2. The dial on the Vacheron is amazing but the dial on the blue Milgauss is quite unique - it’s a shade of oceanic blue that is hard to find anywhere else.
3. The Vacheron has those weird dugouts in the bezel. I don’t understand why. I much prefer the simple forms on the Milgauss.
4. while the forms on the Milgauss are classic, there are so many quirky design elements that take it out of the classical Rolex look - crazy dial colors, green crystal, orange on the dial, orange on the seconds hand... it’s just a fun piece to the deadly and dull seriousness of the Vacheron.
5. 37mm is too small for my wrist.
6. The Milgauss, particularly in Z-blue, has superior value retention. Not such an issue if you’re buying a used and already depreciated G1 Overseas, but I like the idea of watches that hold value or appreciate.
7. service costs on the Milgauss will be far lower, and less frequent.
8. Pretty much the only thing I like better about the Vacheron is the exhibition case-back. I wish Rolex had those, with movements to match the view.
Here's my take as a gen 3 Overseas owner on the latest 4500v...

1 - I know the gen 2 hacks, mine, the 4500v doesn't, not sure about the gen 1. IMO, it's a non-issue. But I'm not OCD about accuracy either, plus there's an easy workaround for this.

2 - Dial on the Milgauss is definitely cool but the dial on the 4500v is simply amazing.

3 - It's a design feature, resembling the shape of the Maltese cross, which you'll find throughout the watch.

4 - The Milgauss is definitely one of the funner and more unique Rolexes. But there's nothing "deadly and dull seriousness" about the VC. Just my subjective, biased opinion.

5 - I would agree. OP should take a serious look at the gen 2 or latest Overseas instead.

6 - If the OP is buying a gen 1 Overseas used, the original owner already took that depreciation hit. Personally, I don't really care about value since I'm keeping my watches forever, but the 4500v will be the next one to surge in value as it's becoming more difficult to obtain and many are starting to recognize that it's a solid, even a better, alternative to the 15202 or 5711. Grey market prices for a new one are already slightly higher than retail.

7 - VC will probably costs more to service but frequency is about the same.

8 - Most Rolex movements are fairly industrial looking, which is a good thing. If they started to produce highly decorated movements, it'll come along with a price increase. IMO that would also move away from the Rolex DNA and what makes Rolex so good. I would prefer the closed caseback for that reason.

IMO, if the OP really wants a Vacheron, I would consider a pre-owned gen 2 or new 4500v Overseas instead of the gen 1. Getting the gen 1 might feel like a compromise. Factoring in price, if it's simply the Gen 1 Overseas vs the Milgausss, I would go for the Milgausss.
 
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