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Hi guys,
I found this little pocket watch on estate sale in the area earlier today and what attracted me to it is what's engraved on the inside of the back cover.
The Watch is LANCET Swiss made, it doesn't run.
I don't know the brand and I'm assuming that there's no value there but for 15 dollars i took the shoot hoping that "Filled Gold" means that it is actual gold, not gold plated or something similar.
Thanks for your help



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Unfortunately you need to prepare yourself for some disappointment since it is, essentially, plated.
 

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Really?!
I thought filled would mean actually gold!

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Yeh, it is a strange term 'gold filled', it doesn't really describe what it is you are getting.

Vinylgreek is correct in that the case is plated with gold, but plated in a way very different from the more
common electro-plating process.

Gold filled watch cases are produced from laminated sheets of gold and brass, thin sheets of gold are fused onto
either side of a thicker brass sheet. The gold is around 10 microns thick in a case made to wear 10 years before it
starts showing wear through. In the case of your watch with the 20 year guarantee, the original thickness of the gold
'plating' would be around 20 microns.

The process was so good and the gold thick enough that many gold filled cases survive which show no wear through.
 

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"Gold Filled" is a someone loose description (the "filling" is the brass), and it refers specifically to the fact that it is gold on both sides. A gold "Sandwhich" if you will, as opposed to rolled gold, which could only be on one side. Rolled Gold and Gold Filled are sometimes used interchangeably, but they're slightly different processes.

Yours has a 10 year "Guarantee", which dates it to before 1928 (when the US banned the use of the term, and most makers switched to "warranted", but 10 years was usually the lowest "grade", indicating the thinest amount of gold. The roughly inscribed jewel/adjustment markings suggest this was made close to the 1909 timeframe, when such marking became required for import. Both Locust (on the caseback) and Lancet were trademarks of Marvin (trademark registered in 1905); I can't quite make out the other name on the movement... A. Scherz?
 
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