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Not in the water, but I did have a spring bar fail on my new-to-me Ploprof, and despite landing on a literal bed of rubber pellets (a field-turf soccer field I was walking across) it tangled the mainspring and required a visit to Omega’s Seattle repair facility - fortunately local to me - to fix.

I’ve been more cautious since then, and most often wear my Seiko divers in the ocean.

The best bet for nicer watches in the water is proper NATO straps, which offer great security against a single springbar failure. If both spring bars fail… well, it’s better to have loved and lost, as they say.
 

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I experienced spring bar failure at the beach with my Seiko Pepsi turtle.
Luckily, it happened in my hands right after I got out of the water.
I was shocked and didn't even think such a thing was possible.
It's made to go in the water! But it did. And these things can and do happen.
IMO, it's NOT worth the risk to take an expensive watch like an Omega to the beach.
Spring bars, sand, and frankly unsavory characters who might try to rob me.
But it's great for the other 340+ days out of the year, so it's really a non-issue!
 
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It’s a tough one. It boils down to this for me: where am I leaving my watch? If I’m on vacation, it stays on the wrist vs leaving in a hotel room (even in a safe). Otherwise, I will take a cheaper, super durable diver like my citizen promaster.


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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
Also, regular maintenance helps. People always think of service intervals recommended by manufacturers as just about the movement, but they are about the whole watch.

Regular servicing will result in the movement being serviced, plus the seals in the case being exchanged, the spring bars replaced, and the pins/tubes in the bracelets being checked and replaced if loose.

I've also removed plenty of spring bars from watches where the spring bar just falls apart when it's removed. These are never spring bars that have just been in there for a few years - they have been in use for very long periods of time.
Very good point. I have replaced all my springbars in the last year, but I never serviced my Quartz SMP.
 

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I never lost a watch, never had spring bar failure, but I replace them often.
I had pins coming out of the bracelet on my SMP (2531.80), I put my hand in my pocket and my watch just fell from my wrist, I found a pin and tubes on my pocket.
I contacted my local OB and they provided me with replacement pins and tubes.
I think bracelet pins or screws are likely where the risk is.
Quality spring bars are cheap, they can be replaced routinely.

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My boss lost his Rolex Submariner whilst windsurfing in Greece somewhere. I have seen a guy lose his watch on a dive. Unluckily for him we were diving a wall (2,500 feet drop below us) in a steaming current. I saw the watch go but there was no way anyone was gonna get to it before it hit the bottom.

Since then I dive with the cheapest watch I have (generally a Casio MDV106). I’m not risking a vintage Omega Seamaster 300, or a Rolex Submariner on any dive. Just not worth it.


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Looking at the public forums responses - watches being lost is more common than people being hit by a bus - at least in 1st world countries.

But

I do get what your saying - i always wore mine yet now having second thoughts. Money is one thing, yet both of my Seamasters are very sentimental. The SMP is the watch that started my WIS journey and the PO is a 40 birthday gift from my wife (which she let me choose). I'd be pretty devastated if I lost either one.

Maybe the TAG should be my beach watch - I really like it but this one has no sentimental association.
Funny enough, that is my go to watch when I'm vacationing be it the beach or otherwise. I rarely vacation travel with my Omegas. Mainly business or for the day with family and friends.
 

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I consider spring bars (QUALITY ones) part of regular preventative maintenance, so I don't hesitate to wear my SMP in the ocean. Or any other watch. I typically do wear watches in the water on a single pass nato for comfort reasons, which also happens to add an additional layer of security. These things were built for use in the ocean. Back in the day pro divers would get decades of use from a Sub or Sea Dweller. And the quality back then was nowhere near current.

I'm sure **** happens, but honestly I think I'm more likely to lose ownership of an expensive watch to an opportunistic thief while walking down the street in London than I am to the abyss
 

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While I wear Natos (and an EO) exclusively, I wonder if they make a watch springbar more prone to failing from an impact than a bracelet or padded strap.
 

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I think it's wise to change the springbars as part of regular maintenance. How often probably depends on whether it's a daily wearer (think sweat and grime), or perhaps even on how frequently
it's used in Salt water.

I also believe that a simple one piece nylon Nato strap with welded buckle is about as secure as things get. One springbar could fail, but two failing at the same time is less likely. You'd still have your watch if there were a failure.

I practice this and have never lost a watch due to a springbar failure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 · (Edited)
I'm sure **** happens, but honestly I think I'm more likely to lose ownership of an expensive watch to an opportunistic thief while walking down the street in London than I am to the abyss
Thankfully I live in a city where people haven't caught onto expensive watches.

I'm going to use the before mention TAG for the family beach trips yet when I travel, it's Omega. I don't often swim at beaches on travels and if I do, it will just have to be a risk. I'm not too worried about pools - I can find the watch in a pool.
 

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Nope - but my mum managed to get the clasp of her 2-tone Rolex Lady Datejust caught on something and blub blub blub. Luckily it was in Bonaire, visibility was good and it was only about 30 feet down so I went and got it. That's the one advantage of a really shiny watch... you can see it a loooong way down.
 

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I posted this on the public forum and the replies were very interesting. I'm now interested in having this as an Omega specific topic. Largely because I have two Omega dive watches.

My Ma-in-law commented how foolish it is to wear my Omega Planet Ocean swimming at the beach. It is a treasured watch (40th birthday gift). I explain it's a divers watch and specifically deigned for the ocean.

A few weeks later I went swimming with some of my friends and one was not wearing his newish Seamaster in the ocean. He said something about damaging and loosing it.

Has anyone actually lost a Omega in the sea/water?

I'm a firm believer in wearing a diver watch in the sea - what it was designed and intended for. BUT I have to admit, after reading some of the stories on the public form, I have second thoughts. It seems the springbars are the achilles heel.

For those interested, these are the public forum replies:

Better make sure you give a tug on the lugs before going swimming in the deeps just to make sure you don't catch a catastrophic failure before it happens.

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