WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey Guys,

As I'm sure you've already gleaned from the title of this post, I'm a novice in the world of horology, and specifically, in the world of manual watches. I just received my first manual: a Hamilton Khaki Field Green Dial (HML-H69419363). I wound it for the first time, out of the box, yesterday, until I felt some tension/resistance on the crown, and not past that. This must not have been enough rotations, as this morning, the watch stopped (at approximately 4 AM). I wound it again, this time through some tension/resistance on the crown. My question is whether one should stop winding when he feels this resistance, or wind through the resistance until the crown completely stops. Obviously, I'm proceeding cautiously, as I do not want to damage the main spring. As usual, your insights and tips will be greatly appreciated.

Thank You!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,771 Posts
Wind gently till you feel total resistance, then stop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, Ray. So wind until the crown will not move anymore without the use of a lot of force or pliers?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,819 Posts
Thanks, Ray. So wind until the crown will not move anymore without the use of a lot of force or pliers?
lol - Don't take pliers anywhere near your watch!!

Gentle winding with tips of finger and thumb and stopping as soon as you feel a resistance, won't get you into too much trouble :)

You will feel a gentle increase in resistance as you wind the watch up, but there will be a definite stop you will reach - this is when you stop
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Haha, thanks, Watchma. No, I'm afraid of using my fingers, let alone pliers. My only issue is that I stopped when I felt resistance, and got only about 12 hours out of the mechanism; the specifications claimed I would get ~40 hours with a full wind. That's why I think that stopping when I hit first resistance isn't enough. It might just be an idiosyncrasy with this piece.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
844 Posts
The movement is a 2804-2, which is similar to the 2801-2 in my glycine combat 6 (yours have date, mine doesnt.) Just wind until you feel it stop, GENTLY.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Thanks, guys. I'll look at the video. I didn't count, but I don't think I would it more than 20 rotations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,990 Posts
Thanks, guys. I'll look at the video. I didn't count, but I don't think I would it more than 20 rotations.
A full 40 hours or so should be about 40 turns. So if you wind daily, it'll be about 20 turns. Next time count, and if you still don't get anywhere near the stated reserve, I'd consider a return.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28,501 Posts
You will know when you have fully wound it as it will stop winding. It will not be difficult to know when you are done because it will no longer turn (unless you exert ridiculous force turning it, which no one would ever do). So don't worry and just wind your watch ;-)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,245 Posts
Yeah as others have said, wind until the crown no longer turns. Trust me it's pretty much impossible to overwind a watch using only your fingers. Just do a gentle forward and back winding motion until the crown no longer turns.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Thanks, guys. You all answered my question.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,498 Posts
. . . . . . Obviously, I'm proceeding cautiously, as I do not want to damage the main spring. As usual, your insights and tips will be greatly appreciated. . . . .
This is similar to the standard ETA 2801 mainspring barrel.

When a level of torque is applied exceeding that which the mainspring bridle in its engagement with one of the six (6) indentations in the barrel's interior will withstand, the end of the mainspring advances to the next indentation.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,498 Posts
A full 40 hours or so should be about 40 turns. So if you wind daily, it'll be about 20 turns. Next time count, and if you still don't get anywhere near the stated reserve, I'd consider a return.
If the watch had not been wound since service or assembly, and

the mainspring is 400mm long and

the mainspring is .125mm thick and

the mainspring arbor is 3.36mm in nominal diameter (less hook) and

the winding pinion has 12 teeth and

the ratchet wheel has 32 teeth

- the crown would need @ 58 revolutions to fully wind it?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,819 Posts
If the watch had not been wound since service or assembly, and

the mainspring is 400mm long and

the mainspring is .125mm thick and

the mainspring arbor is 3.36mm in nominal diameter (less hook) and

the winding pinion has 12 teeth and

the ratchet wheel has 32 teeth

- the crown would need @ 58 revolutions to fully wind it?
You've not factored in the oil thickness on the mainspring surface - Schoolboy error

:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,498 Posts
You've not factored in the oil thickness on the mainspring surface - Schoolboy error :)
There is an certain inherent lack of precision in the method I employed with regard to averaging the lapping of the layers of spring. A few micron of lubricant which would be grease or dry treatment - not oil - neither adds to or subtracts from significantly this approximation.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top