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Ok, hear me out with this possibility... My Sinn 104 gained maybe a second a day before I wore it on a flight to Chile this past summer. When I arrived there I went to advance the time + 2 hours for the time change and found the crown very hard to unscrew. Then, within a day, the watch was gaining 15 seconds a day. It has remained the same ever since. Can airplane travel cause a watch to have these problems? the 104 is considered an aviator watch, to boot... Watch is nine months old. It hasn’t been magnetized.

Thanks for any input as to why the watch is behaving like this, literally overnight.
 

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No, airplane travel would not cause that to happen, probably best to have it examined under warranty.
 

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Are you sure it wasn’t magnetized? It has a sapphire crystal caseback, and not overly antimagnetic. Mine seemed to get magnetized often, and lots of opportunities to magnetize on a flight/airport/travel.
 

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Could be magnetized, but the crown is hard to unscrew. Did it thread back in smoothly? Best thing is you are under warranty.


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Are you sure it wasn’t magnetized? It has a sapphire crystal caseback, and not overly antimagnetic. Mine seemed to get magnetized often, and lots of opportunities to magnetize on a flight/airport/travel.
Good thing it’s still under warranty. Did it go under water perhaps with the crown slightly unscrewed?
 

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15 seconds a day really isn’t really so indicative of being magnetized. And the 104 is antimagnetic to 4800 A/m.


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My Sinn 104 gained maybe a second a day before I wore it on a flight to Chile this past summer. When I arrived there I went to advance the time + 2 hours for the time change and found the crown very hard to unscrew.
Did it go under water perhaps with the crown slightly unscrewed?
It sounds like something that was maybe caused by aircraft pressurization (anybody that carries sealed shampoo bottles knows the post-flight pop).

Complete guess/maybe/what-if: Maybe during the flight the watch either got higher or lower pressure than outside and unscrewing the crown "popped" an air pressure wave through the insides of the watch disrupting things. Prior to flight, your crown may not have been completely sealed.
 

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I was curious about the 104 as I was uncertain what model it is.
Sinn.de came on my screen and I see this watch is "The Classic Pilots Watch."

Please let us know what the problem turns out to be.
 

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I downloaded an app that is supposed to be able to detect whether or not a watch is magnetized by using the magnet in a smartphone. Allegedly, my watch is not magnetized, but it should probably go to a local watch repair to see if it really is. I noticed that the crown stem is a little wiggly, too. I am always careful to “lefty loosey” the crown a half turn before doing the “righty tighty” to screw it closed. Watch has never been submerged in water. Is the stateside repair shop WatchBuys recommends good? Shipping to Germany is pricey! Thanks.
 

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Sounds like it has been magnetized.

I have heard of the x-ray machines, both the stand up and conveyor belt ones, magnetizing watches. I’ve never experienced it but have heard of people swearing that has happened. Also, if you use your lap top on the plane and you’re all squished in with arms up on the computer, the speaker magnet inside your laptop can do it too.
 

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Sounds like it has been magnetized.

I have heard of the x-ray machines, both the stand up and conveyor belt ones, magnetizing watches. I’ve never experienced it but have heard of people swearing that has happened. Also, if you use your lap top on the plane and you’re all squished in with arms up on the computer, the speaker magnet inside your laptop can do it too.
An X-ray machine won’t magnetize your watch, and more likely than not neither will your laptop. I use the following laptop regularly and it never presents an issue. The magnetic closure is so strong I can stick the laptop to a steel cabinet and it will hang there. Modern watch mov’ts aren’t that susceptible to being magnetized to fault as something from several decades ago.

https://youtu.be/hSrar-aPqhc


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It sounds like something that was maybe caused by aircraft pressurization (anybody that carries sealed shampoo bottles knows the post-flight pop).

Complete guess/maybe/what-if: Maybe during the flight the watch either got higher or lower pressure than outside and unscrewing the crown "popped" an air pressure wave through the insides of the watch disrupting things. Prior to flight, your crown may not have been completely sealed.
I highly doubt this. I fly a lot for work (often 3-4 round trips a month, sometimes more), not to mention leisure travel, and always have at least one mechanical watch on me. I often unscrew the crown and adjust in-flight. Have never had an issue.
 

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An X-ray machine won’t magnetize your watch, and more likely than not neither will your laptop. I use the following laptop regularly and it never presents an issue. The magnetic closure is so strong I can stick the laptop to a steel cabinet and it will hang there. Modern watch mov’ts aren’t that susceptible to being magnetized to fault as something from several decades ago.

https://youtu.be/hSrar-aPqhc
I won't argue with your personal experience, & not saying that OP's problem is the result of magnetization, but disagree with your last statement. Overall, most modern watch movements are less susceptible to magnetization than vintage movements, but that's offset by varying degrees of protection (Sinn v. Nomos, for a simple example) & the greater presence of powerful magnets (like those in your laptop, but also rare earth magnets in handbag clasps, etc.) in our everyday lives.
 

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Hard to say what happened.... could have been magnetized or could be a coincidence. 15 seconds isn't THAT bad though.... in my experience magnetized watches run a fair bit faster than that.
 

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I highly doubt this. I fly a lot for work (often 3-4 round trips a month, sometimes more), not to mention leisure travel, and always have at least one mechanical watch on me. I often unscrew the crown and adjust in-flight. Have never had an issue.
Yeah, me too, but just because it doesn't happen to us doesn't mean it can't happen ... Here's the key line:

"When I arrived there I ... found the crown very hard to unscrew. Then, within a day, the watch was gaining 15 seconds"

Why would the crown suddenly be "hard to unscrew"? If it's not a mistake / never noticed, that sure sounds like pressurization. I worked in aircraft engineering for 10 years debugging problems like this and I can say whenever these were the symptoms it was always pressure - air pressure can do bizarre stuff, especially to small things.

With that said, you may be right and it's a long shot; IME sudden behavior change in mechanical devices usually points to some minorly violent physical event like a strike or pressure wave.
 
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