WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,579 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'll take the time and do like my friend @tony20009 and put out a very long, thoughtful post.

Here it goes: Title says it all - of all the movements you've ever owned which one did you like the most? This seems pretty straight-forward, but what I mean isn't really that simple. What I mean by this is, very subjectively, of all the movements you have ever own - now or in the past - which one is the most special to you, and why?

I'll start. I have been collecting for a relatively short time (especially compared to some folks here) but in this short stretch, I did my fair share of buying, selling and trading. With this, I have owned all sorts of watches, from quartz to mechanical, in-house or workhorse ETA movements, simple or complicated, swiss or otherwise, all shapes and sizes. Some of the movements I've owned were incredibly well regarded. Others, not so much.

Picking one from the bunch, this will have to be the absolute winner in my book:

tumblr_inline_n3lhis1Z2I1s69se6.jpg
Vulcain V-10 calibre - a modern rendition of the famous 120 cricket calibre, first introduced in 1947.

Here's my story: for reasons very dear to me, I ended up creating a huge fondness for mechanical alarms. At some point, this has become a bit of a theme in my collection, especially my vintage watches. When I found out that, back in 1947, Vulcain became the first to successfully miniaturize a wrist alarm, I just became enamored with the Cricket. When I found out how many US presidents wore one as their daily watches, I just had to have it. With this, the first chance I had, I purchased a sixty-something Vulcain Cricket.

My vintage cricket was a cool acquisition. It was in great shape - the dial looked great, the hands were pretty clean, the case held up well, given how old it was. But it was in desperate need for a repair. I spent a few months building up funds and waiting for the right time, and then, day came to take it back to my trusted watchmaker to get it running the way it should. When I got it back, it was chirping loud, and working flawlessly. I immediately fell in love with that movement, with all its particularities and limitations. And with the very interesting way it operates. If you never handled a cricket, it's quite an experience. I'll leave it at this: it's a manually wound movement, but you use the same crown to wind the mainspring and the alarm movement. Also, if you go by the usual convention, and wind it as you would any other watch, you are actually winding the alarm. On top of that, you can only set it clockwise. Which means, if you're trying to set it to the minute and miss it, well, tough luck - you have to adjust it all over again, 12 hours ahead.

Sounds awful when I say, but when you get a hang of it, it becomes the kind of movement that reminds you of everything you love about this hobby. It gives you the kind of amusement that only us who enjoy a fine watch can appreciate. With that, bit by bit, that little watch slowly became one of my favorites. But there was something missing. I loved handling the 120 calibre, but hated how spartan it looked trapped inside its case.

Fast forward to a few years later. Times had changed a bit. So did my collection. In my personal/professional life, I was about to reach an important milestone. It was finally time to put all the knowledge and deals I've made over the past few years to work and get a special watch. I looked around and around, and finally found one that seemed to meet all the requirements: I ended up settling for a modern Vulcain. It is a beautiful watch, that has a lot to love, from the looks to the case design, to the fact it's a manufacture watch, in times that everyone else uses third-party movements. One thing was special to me - it used the very same movement of my vintage cricket. Not only that, but it solved some of the things that bugged me about it. It was new, unworn - it would give me the peace of mind that I was wearing a piece of history, that had the reliability of a new watch. But most importantly, it had a display caseback, so I could see it operating, and a few nice little touches - like the beautiful gears on the back, or the gunmetal brushed finish, or the flame blued screws on the movement.

Don't get me wrong - this is far from being a perfect watch. And it is definitely far from being a watch for everyone. But when I think about it, today this is definitely my grail. For several reasons, but the most important one is the movement that drives it.

So, this is my story. I'm looking forward to hearing from you guys.

Cheers.
 

·
WatchUSeek Administrator
Joined
·
39,168 Posts
I'm a big fan of the Lemania 5100 (and all its variants) for its durability and robust, simple design.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,456 Posts
I have not owned any really fancy watches, but I have the Seiko 5R65 and Zenith El Primero 405B right now and am very happy with both..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
762 Posts
I haven't owned anything exotic, but probably the ETA-2801 or the ETA-2484.

I love the 2801 for being the handwind 2824 with a more robust winding system. I want to get another watch with this movement as I have sold my Stowa Paritio and I miss winding it up every morning. I might get a Smiths PRS-29a sometime soon to scratch that itch.



I love the 2484 for its short run in Tudors in the early 70's. It's a simple movement, but I like that it represents a small slice of time in the early 70's when muscle cars where owning the streets and my parents were only 10 years old. I could be wrong, but I think Tudor was the only company to use this movement. Here is my Prince Oysterdate with a 2484 ticking away inside. I will probably never sell this watch (especially after the long service it needed to get it running right).



The only other movements I have owned are a few ETA 2824's and Seiko 7S26's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,924 Posts
I'll take the time and do like my friend @tony20009 and put out a very long, thoughtful post.

Here it goes: Title says it all - of all the movements you've ever owned which one did you like the most? This seems pretty straight-forward, but what I mean isn't really that simple. What I mean by this is, very subjectively, of all the movements you have ever own - now or in the past - which one is the most special to you, and why?

I'll start. I have been collecting for a relatively short time (especially compared to some folks here) but in this short stretch, I did my fair share of buying, selling and trading. With this, I have owned all sorts of watches, from quartz to mechanical, in-house or workhorse ETA movements, simple or complicated, swiss or otherwise, all shapes and sizes. Some of the movements I've owned were incredibly well regarded. Others, not so much.

Picking one from the bunch, this will have to be the absolute winner in my book:

View attachment 2624010
Vulcain V-10 calibre - a modern rendition of the famous 120 cricket calibre, first introduced in 1947.

Here's my story: for reasons very dear to me, I ended up creating a huge fondness for mechanical alarms. At some point, this has become a bit of a theme in my collection, especially my vintage watches. When I found out that, back in 1947, Vulcain became the first to successfully miniaturize a wrist alarm, I just became enamored with the Cricket. When I found out how many US presidents wore one as their daily watches, I just had to have it. With this, the first chance I had, I purchased a sixty-something Vulcain Cricket.

My vintage cricket was a cool acquisition. It was in great shape - the dial looked great, the hands were pretty clean, the case held up well, given how old it was. But it was in desperate need for a repair. I spent a few months building up funds and waiting for the right time, and then, day came to take it back to my trusted watchmaker to get it running the way it should. When I got it back, it was chirping loud, and working flawlessly. I immediately fell in love with that movement, with all its particularities and limitations. And with the very interesting way it operates. If you never handled a cricket, it's quite an experience. I'll leave it at this: it's a manually wound movement, but you use the same crown to wind the mainspring and the alarm movement. Also, if you go by the usual convention, and wind it as you would any other watch, you are actually winding the alarm. On top of that, you can only set it clockwise. Which means, if you're trying to set it to the minute and miss it, well, tough luck - you have to adjust it all over again, 12 hours ahead.

Sounds awful when I say, but when you get a hang of it, it becomes the kind of movement that reminds you of everything you love about this hobby. It gives you the kind of amusement that only us who enjoy a fine watch can appreciate. With that, bit by bit, that little watch slowly became one of my favorites. But there was something missing. I loved handling the 120 calibre, but hated how spartan it looked trapped inside its case.

Fast forward to a few years later. Times had changed a bit. So did my collection. In my personal/professional life, I was about to reach an important milestone. It was finally time to put all the knowledge and deals I've made over the past few years to work and get a special watch. I looked around and around, and finally found one that seemed to meet all the requirements: I ended up settling for a modern Vulcain. It is a beautiful watch, that has a lot to love, from the looks to the case design, to the fact it's a manufacture watch, in times that everyone else uses third-party movements. One thing was special to me - it used the very same movement of my vintage cricket. Not only that, but it solved some of the things that bugged me about it. It was new, unworn - it would give me the peace of mind that I was wearing a piece of history, that had the reliability of a new watch. But most importantly, it had a display caseback, so I could see it operating, and a few nice little touches - like the beautiful gears on the back, or the gunmetal brushed finish, or the flame blued screws on the movement.

Don't get me wrong - this is far from being a perfect watch. And it is definitely far from being a watch for everyone. But when I think about it, today this is definitely my grail. For several reasons, but the most important one is the movement that drives it.

So, this is my story. I'm looking forward to hearing from you guys.

Cheers.
Picture? Familiar with old crickets. Not new.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
71,174 Posts
It's not complex nor pretty but I take my hat off to the SW 200-1. Any movement that can survive on my wrist on a regular basis deserves a mention.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,673 Posts
I like the 46L41 in the Orient World Heritage. Not the prettiest movement but what I like it for is the superior accuracy and the excellent rotating world time chapter ring, kind of a GMT for the whole world, pretty neat!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,024 Posts
Ball World Time Diver.
Modified ETA 2836 movement..............300m diver with DAY, DATE & WORLD TIME.

ball 1.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,344 Posts
I would also say the Chopard LUC x.96 calibres.

The famed 1.96 is simply incredible, and often compared to the likes of Patek automatic calibres. The 3.96 and 4.96 come from the same vein, and are one of the great auto movements on the market. Visually interesting, mechanically sound, and designed by the brilliant Michel Parmigiani for Chopard LUC.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
Omega 490, their first full rotor automatic movement (small seconds). Not much to look at, but it's old and keeps great time. I found it when going through my grandmother's stuff. No one is sure where it came from, but I assume it was my grandfather's.

movement2.jpg
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top